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Department of South Asian Languages and Civilizations

Chair

  • Whitney Cox

Professors

  • Muzaffar Alam - Director of Graduate Studies
  • Dipesh Chakrabarty
  • Wendy Doniger
  • Ulrike Stark
  • Gary Tubb

Associate Professors

  • Whitney Cox
  • Thibaut d’Hubert  
  • Sascha Ebeling
  • Rochona Majumdar 

Assistant Professors

  • Tyler Williams - Director of Undergraduate Studies

Visiting Professors

  • E. Annamalai

Associated Faculty

  • Daniel A. Arnold (Divinity School)
  • Christian K.  Wedemeyer (Divinity School)

Senior Lecturers

  • Elena Bashir
  • Philip Engblom
  • Jason Grunebaum

Lecturers

  • Karma T. Ngodup

Emeritus Faculty

  • Kali Charan Bahl
  • Ronald B. Inden
  • Colin P. Masica
  • C. M. Naim
  • Frank E. Reynolds
  • Clinton B.Seely
  • Norman H. Zide

The Department

The Department of South Asian Languages and Civilizations is a multidisciplinary department comprised of faculty with expertise in the languages, literatures, histories, philosophies, and religions of South Asia. The examination of South Asian texts, broadly defined, is the guiding principle of our Ph.D. degree, and the dissertation itself. This involves acquaintance with a wide range of South Asian texts and their historical contexts, and theoretical reflection on the conditions of understanding and interpreting these texts. These goals are met through departmental seminars and advanced language courses, which lead up to the dissertation project.

The Department admits applications only for the Ph.D. degree and does not offer a terminal M.A. program, although graduate students in the doctoral program may receive an M.A. degree in the course of their work toward the Ph.D.  Students admitted to the doctoral program are typically awarded a five-year fellowship package that includes full tuition, academic year stipends, stipends for some summers, and medical insurance.  Experience in teaching positions is a required part of the program, and students are given opportunities to teach at several levels in both language courses and other courses.

Students seeking a terminal master’s degree should apply to the Master of Arts Program in the Humanities (MAPH, as either a three-quarter program of interdisciplinary study or - as is often more attractive to students interested in South Asia - in the MAPH two-year Language Intensive Option). MAPH students often take classes with students in the Ph.D. programs.  Further details about the MAPH program are available at http://maph.uchicago.edu/

The Degree of Doctor of Philosophy

Doctoral students in South Asian Languages and Civilizations must complete a minimum of 18 courses, which will include the required language courses, the three required departmental seminars, and other courses relevant to the student’s chosen specialty. Under some conditions, students may receive credit for earlier course work done in a higher degree program at another university.  For details of the course requirements, see the Department webpages.

Before beginning work on the doctoral dissertation, Ph.D. students must also fulfill the following requirements:

  • Meet general language requirements
  • Complete the three required departmental seminars
  • Receive a passing grade on the two qualifying papers
  • Formulate two reading lists and pass an oral examination based on them
  • Write and defend a dissertation proposal

The languages in which the department offers concentrations are Bangla, Hindi, Marathi, Pali, Sanskrit, Tamil, Tibetan, and Urdu. Persian and Arabic are also available through the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations. Students must meet specified standards in three languages:

  • The South Asian language of concentration (the major language)
  • A second South Asian language relevant to the student’s program of study (the minor language)
  • A third language of scholarship (e.g. French, German, Hindi, Japanese)

Requirements for proficiency levels and coursework are explained in detail on the Department webpages.

Competence in South Asian languages and civilizations is demonstrated as much by close familiarity with South Asian texts as by a broad knowledge of the plurality of South Asian practices and traditions. To this end the Ph.D. program includes three required departmental seminars, which are offered over a two-year cycle and must be completed in the first two years.  The seminars include two on research themes and one on South Asia as a unit of study.

In each of the first two years of their programs, students are required to submit a qualifying paper on a subject agreed upon with a faculty member.  The papers are designed to demonstrate, in addition to general scholarly competence, the ability to deal with secondary sources in the first year, and with primary sources in the second year.

Following the completion of the two qualifying papers, students compose, under the supervision of faculty members, two reading lists, and prepare for an oral examination on each of the lists, one of which one will deal with a major area of study and the other with a substantially different area.

Upon successful completion of the oral examinations, students write and defend a detailed dissertation proposal, prepared under the supervision of the chair of the proposed dissertation committee.  Dissertation proposals are defended orally before the entire department.

The completed dissertation is defended before the dissertation committee, which ordinarily consists of three faculty members, with a member of the SALC faculty as chair, in an oral defense presided over by the departmental chair.

Time to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree, marked by the successful defense of the dissertation proposal, is expected to be within four years.  Time to degree has been achieved by students in as few as six years.

Application and Admission

Completed applications for admission and aid, along with all supporting materials, are due in mid-December for the academic year that starts in the following autumn.

Students whose first language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). Information about these tests may be obtained from the Educational Testing Service, Princeton, NJ 08540.

The application process for admission and financial aid for all graduate programs in Humanities is administered through the divisional Office of the Dean of Students. The Application for Admission and Financial Aid, with instructions, deadlines and department specific information is available online at: http://humanities.uchicago.edu/prospective/#admissions.

Questions pertaining to admissions and aid should be directed to humanitiesadmissions@uchicago.edu or (773) 702-1552.

Further Information

The SALC Department webpages at http://salc.uchicago.edu provide detailed information on language programs, faculty specialties, degree requirements, teaching opportunities, sources of funding, fellowships for language study and for pre-dissertation research and overseas dissertation research, and many other resources.

Malayaman Courses

There are currently no courses offered in this subject.

Telegu Courses

TLGU 30300. Third-Year Telugu III. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): V. Narayana Rao
Prerequisite(s): TLGU 20300 or comparable level of language skills

TLGU 30600. Classical Telugu III. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): V. Narayana Rao
Prerequisite(s): At least two years of Sanskrit and knowledge of Telugu script

Panjabi Courses

There are currently no courses offered in this subject.

Bangla Courses

BANG 30100-30200-30300. Third-Year Bangla (Bengali) I-II-III.

When joining this course the student is expected to demonstrate the ability to narrate in all time frames of the language. The student should be able to provide a simple though articulate discourse on familiar topics and subjects directly related to the his/her interests. He/She will learn to provide a full account of events and to use appropriately complex sentences in Bangla. We will also focus on some aspects of the technical language pertaining to various domains. The student will be invited to discuss orally on written material studied in class and at home, and he/she will have to produce two to three pages long essays on a given topic. Systematic introductions to a variety of registers and literary idioms (19th century Sadhu Bhasha, dialects, etc.) will also be provided. By the end of the spring quarter the student will have the necessary tools to expand significantly his/her abilities in order to reach the superior level.

BANG 30100. Third-Year Bangla (Bengali) I. 100 Units.

When joining this course the student is expected to demonstrate the ability to narrate in all time frames of the language. The student should be able to provide a simple though articulate discourse on familiar topics and subjects directly related to the his/her interests. He/She will learn to provide a full account of events and to use appropriately complex sentences in Bangla. We will also focus on some aspects of the technical language pertaining to various domains. The student will be invited to discuss orally on written material studied in class and at home, and he/she will have to produce two to three pages long essays on a given topic. Systematic introductions to a variety of registers and literary idioms (19th century Sadhu Bhasha, dialects, etc.) will also be provided. By the end of the spring quarter the student will have the necessary tools to expand significantly his/her abilities in order to reach the superior level.

Instructor(s): T. d'Hubert     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Second year Bangla or comparable level of language skills

BANG 30200. Third-Year Bangla-2. 100 Units.

When joining this course the student is expected to demonstrate the ability to narrate in all time frames of the language. The student should be able to provide a simple though articulate discourse on familiar topics and subjects directly related to the his/her interests. He/She will learn to provide a full account of events and to use appropriately complex sentences in Bangla. We will also focus on some aspects of the technical language pertaining to various domains. The student will be invited to discuss orally on written material studied in class and at home, and he/she will have to produce two to three pages long essays on a given topic. Systematic introductions to a variety of registers and literary idioms (19th century Sadhu Bhasha, dialects, etc.) will also be provided. By the end of the spring quarter the student will have the necessary tools to expand significantly his/her abilities in order to reach the superior level.

Instructor(s): T. d'Hubert     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): BANG 30100 or comparable level of language skills

BANG 30300. Third-Year Bangla-3. 100 Units.

When joining this course the student is expected to demonstrate the ability to narrate in all time frames of the language. The student should be able to provide a simple though articulate discourse on familiar topics and subjects directly related to the his/her interests. He/She will learn to provide a full account of events and to use appropriately complex sentences in Bangla. We will also focus on some aspects of the technical language pertaining to various domains. The student will be invited to discuss orally on written material studied in class and at home, and he/she will have to produce two to three pages long essays on a given topic. Systematic introductions to a variety of registers and literary idioms (19th century Sadhu Bhasha, dialects, etc.) will also be provided. By the end of the spring quarter the student will have the necessary tools to expand significantly his/her abilities in order to reach the superior level.

Instructor(s): T. d'Hubert     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BANG 30200 or comparable level of language skills

BANG 39910. Advanced Academic Bangla. 100 Units.

This course develops Advanced Bangla language skills to prepare students for doing research both in India and Bangladesh. Students will read scholarly texts in their areas of academic interest intensively. Training will also include improving students' speaking and listening skills so they can participate in academic talks and discussions and speak fluently and at length across academic topics.

BANG 40100-40200-40300. Fourth-Year Bangla (Bengali) I-II-III.

Students attending this course must be able to produce an articulate discourse on subjects related to history and literary criticism. They should also have a good command of Bengali grammar. The course is mainly devoted to the study of selected modern and premodern Bangla texts (narrative literature, devotional and courtly poetry, treatises) in their historical contexts. We propose various readings in the historiography of Bangla literature, philology, traditional performance of Bangla poetry, etc... Besides, material from all periods will be studied according to the student's scholarly interests.

BANG 40100. Fourth-Year Bangla (Bengali) I. 100 Units.

Students attending this course must be able to produce an articulate discourse on subjects related to history and literary criticism. They should also have a good command of Bengali grammar. The course is mainly devoted to the study of selected modern and premodern Bangla texts (narrative literature, devotional and courtly poetry, treatises) in their historical contexts. We propose various readings in the historiography of Bangla literature, philology, traditional performance of Bangla poetry, etc... Besides, material from all periods will be studied according to the student's scholarly interests.

Instructor(s): T. d'Hubert     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Third year Bangla or comparable level of language skills

BANG 40200. Fourth-Year Bangla II. 100 Units.

Students attending this course must be able to produce an articulate discourse on subjects related to history and literary criticism. They should also have a good command of Bengali grammar. The course is mainly devoted to the study of selected modern and premodern Bangla texts (narrative literature, devotional and courtly poetry, treatises) in their historical contexts. We propose various readings in the historiography of Bangla literature, philology, traditional performance of Bangla poetry, etc... Besides, material from all periods will be studied according to the student's scholarly interests.

Instructor(s): T. d'Hubert     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): BANG 40100 or comparable level of language skills

BANG 40300. Fourth-Year Bangla III. 100 Units.

Students attending this course must be able to produce an articulate discourse on subjects related to history and literary criticism. They should also have a good command of Bengali grammar. The course is mainly devoted to the study of selected modern and premodern Bangla texts (narrative literature, devotional and courtly poetry, treatises) in their historical contexts. We propose various readings in the historiography of Bangla literature, philology, traditional performance of Bangla poetry, etc... Besides, material from all periods will be studied according to the student's scholarly interests.

Instructor(s): T. d'Hubert     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BANG 40200 or comparable level of language skills

BANG 47900-47901-47902. Rdgs: Advanced Bangla (Bengali) I-II-III.

This course is for students who have successfully completed third and fourth year Bangla. It is divided between classes dealing with the current research themes of the instructor, and the study of material directly related with the research interests of the students. The focus is on methodology and the use of Bangla as a research language.

BANG 47900. Rdgs: Advanced Bangla I. 100 Units.

This course is for students who have successfully completed third and fourth year Bangla. It is divided between classes dealing with the current research themes of the instructor, and the study of material directly related with the research interests of the students. The focus is on methodology and the use of Bangla as a research language.

Instructor(s): T. d'Hubert     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): BANG 40300

BANG 47901. Advanced Readings in Bangla II. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): T. d'Hubert     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): BANG 47900

BANG 47902. Readings: Advanced Bangla III. 100 Units.

This course is for students who have successfully completed third and fourth year Bangla. It is divided between classes dealing with the current research themes of the instructor, and the study of material directly related to the research interests of the students. The focus is on methodology and the use of Bangla as a research language.

Instructor(s): T. d'Hubert     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BANG 47901

Hindi Courses

HIND 30100-30200-30300. Third-Year Hindi I-II-III.

Readings from Hindi literary and journalistic texts and a wide array of other sources depending on student interests, with continuing grammar review and practice in listening comprehension, composition and speech.

HIND 30100. Third-Year Hindi I. 100 Units.

Readings from Hindi literary and journalistic texts and a wide array of other sources depending on student interests, with continuing grammar review and practice in listening comprehension, composition and speech.

Instructor(s): Ulrike Stark     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): HIND 20300 or comparable level of language skills

HIND 30200. Third-Year Hindi-2. 100 Units.

Readings from Hindi literary and journalistic texts and a wide array of other sources depending on student interests, with continuing grammar review and practice in listening comprehension, composition and speech.

Instructor(s): T. Williams     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): HIND 30100 or comparable level of language skills

HIND 30300. Third-Year Hindi-3. 100 Units.

Readings from Hindi literary and journalistic texts and a wide array of other sources depending on student interests, with continuing grammar review and practice in listening comprehension, composition and speech.

Instructor(s): T. Williams     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): HIND 30200 or comparable level of language skills

HIND 40100-40200-40300. Fourth-Year Hindi I-II-III.

Readings from Hindi literary and journalistic texts and a wide array of other sources depending on student interests, with continuing grammar review and practice in listening comprehension, composition and speech.

HIND 40100. Fourth-Year Hindi I. 100 Units.

Readings from Hindi literary and journalistic texts and a wide array of other sources depending on student interests, with continuing grammar review and practice in listening comprehension, composition and speech.

Instructor(s): Ulrike Stark     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): HIND 30300 or comparable level of language skills

HIND 40200. Fourth-Year Hindi-2. 100 Units.

Readings from Hindi literary and journalistic texts and a wide array of other sources depending on student interests, with continuing grammar review and practice in listening comprehension, composition and speech.

Instructor(s): T. Williams     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): HIND 40100 or comparable level of language skills

HIND 40300. Fourth-Year Hindi-3. 100 Units.

Readings from Hindi literary and journalistic texts and a wide array of other sources depending on student interests, with continuing grammar review and practice in listening comprehension, composition and speech.

Instructor(s): T. Williams     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): HIND 40200 or comparable level of language skills

HIND 47900-47901-47902. Rdgs: Advanced Hindi I-II-III.

Readings from Hindi literary and journalistic texts and a wide array of other sources depending on student interests, with continuing grammar review and practice in listening comprehension, composition and speech.

HIND 47900. Rdgs: Advanced Hindi. 100 Units.

Readings from Hindi literary and journalistic texts and a wide array of other sources depending on student interests, with continuing grammar review and practice in listening comprehension, composition and speech.

Instructor(s): T. Williams     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): HIND 40300

HIND 47901. Readings in Advanced Hindi-2. 100 Units.

Readings from Hindi literary and journalistic texts and a wide array of other sources depending on student interests, with continuing grammar review and practice in listening comprehension, composition and speech.

Instructor(s): T. Williams     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): HIND 47900

HIND 47902. Readings: Advanced Hindi -3. 100 Units.

Readings from Hindi literary and journalistic texts and a wide array of other sources depending on student interests, with continuing grammar review and practice in listening comprehension, composition and speech.

Instructor(s): T. Williams     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): HIND 47901

Marathi Courses

MARA 30100-30200-30300. Third-Year Marathi I-II-III.

MARA 30100-30200-30300 is offered based on demand. Interested students should consult with the director of undergraduate studies. Students in this course read from An Advanced Marathi Reader and a wide array of other sources depending on their interests. This course also includes continuing grammar review and practice in composition and speech. This course typically is offered in alternate years.

MARA 30100. Third-Year Marathi I. 100 Units.

Readings from An Advanced Marathi Reader and a wide array of other sources depending on student interests, with continuing grammar review and practice in composition and speech.

Instructor(s): P. Engblom
Prerequisite(s): MARA 20300 or equivalent

MARA 30200. Third-Year Marathi II. 100 Units.

Readings from An Advanced Marathi Reader and a wide array of other sources depending on student interests, with continuing grammar review and practice in composition and speech.

Instructor(s): P. Engblom
Prerequisite(s): MARA 20300 or equivalent

MARA 30300. Third-Year Marathi III. 100 Units.

Readings from An Advanced Marathi Reader and a wide array of other sources depending on student interests, with continuing grammar review and practice in composition and speech.

Instructor(s): P. Engblom
Prerequisite(s): MARA 20300 or equivalent

MARA 47901. Advanced Readings in Marathi-2. 100 Units.

Pali Courses

PALI 30100-30200-30300. Third-Year Pali I-II-III.

PALI 30100-30200-30300 is offered based on demand. Interested students should consult with the director of undergraduate studies.  These courses will not be offered in the 13-14 academic year.

PALI 30100. Third-Year Pali I. 100 Units.

Advanced Pali is offered based on demand. If it is not listed for the current academic year, interested students should consult with the director of undergraduate studies.

Instructor(s): Steve Collins     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): PALI 20300 or approval of instructor

PALI 30200. Third-Year Pali-2. 100 Units.

Advanced Pali is offered based on demand. If it is not listed for the current academic year, interested students should consult with the director of undergraduate studies.

Instructor(s): Steve Collins     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): PALI 20300 or approval of instructor

PALI 30300. Third-Year Pali-3. 100 Units.

Advanced Pali is offered based on demand. If it is not listed for the current academic year, interested students should consult with the director of undergraduate studies.

Instructor(s): Steve Collins     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): PALI 20300 or approval of instructor

PALI 40100-40200-40300. Fourth-Year Pali I-II-III.

PALI 40100-40200-40300 is offered based on demand. Interested students should consult with the director of undergraduate studies. Readings are drawn from all styles and periods of Pali literature, in prose and verse, chosen according to student interests.  These courses will not be offered in the 13-14 academic year.

PALI 40100. Fourth-Year Pali I. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): Steve Collins     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): PALI 30300 or approval of instructor

PALI 40200. Fourth-Year Pali-2. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): Steve Collins     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): PALI 30300 or approval of instructor

PALI 40300. Fourth-Year Pali-3. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): Steve Collins     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): PALI 30300 or approval of instructor

Sanskrit Courses

SANS 30100-30200-30300. Third-Year Sanskrit I-II-III.

Reading selections introduce major Sanskrit genres, including verse and prose narrative, lyric poetry, drama, and the intellectual discourse of religion, philosophy, and the sciences. Analysis of the language and style employed in commentarial texts and practice in reading such texts is also emphasized.

SANS 30100. Third-Year Sanskrit I. 100 Units.

Reading selections introduce major Sanskrit genres, including verse and prose narrative, lyric poetry, drama, and the intellectual discourse of religion, philosophy, and the sciences. Analysis of the language and style employed in commentarial texts and practice in reading such texts is also emphasized.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): SANS 20300 or approval of instructor

SANS 30200. Third-Year Sanskrit-2. 100 Units.

Reading selections introduce major Sanskrit genres, including verse and prose narrative, lyric poetry, drama, and the intellectual discourse of religion, philosophy, and the sciences. Analysis of the language and style employed in commentarial texts and practice in reading such texts is also emphasized.

Instructor(s): D. Arnold     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): SANS 30100 or approval of instructor

SANS 30300. Third-Year Sanskrit-3. 100 Units.

Reading selections introduce major Sanskrit genres, including verse and prose narrative, lyric poetry, drama, and the intellectual discourse of religion, philosophy, and the sciences. Analysis of the language and style employed in commentarial texts and practice in reading such texts is also emphasized.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SANS 30200 or approval of instructor

SANS 40100-40200-40300. Fourth-Year Sanskrit I-II-III.

The goal of this sequence is to provide students with strong reading expertise in a wide range of Sanskrit texts in literature (poems and plays, verse and prose) and the scientific and philosophical discourses (e.g., grammar, logic, poetic theory, Buddhist thought), and commentarial literature on both.

SANS 40100. Fourth-Year Sanskrit I. 100 Units.

The goal of this sequence is to provide students with strong reading expertise in a wide range of Sanskrit texts in literature (poems and plays, verse and prose) and the scientific and philosophical discourses (e.g., grammar, logic, poetic theory, Buddhist thought), and commentarial literature on both.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): PQ: Third year Sanskrit or comparable level of language skills. SANS 30300 or approval of instructor.

SANS 40200. Fourth-Year Sanskrit-2. 100 Units.

The goal of this sequence is to provide students with strong reading expertise in a wide range of Sanskrit texts in literature (poems and plays, verse and prose) and the scientific and philosophical discourses (e.g., grammar, logic, poetic theory, Buddhist thought), and commentarial literature on both.

Instructor(s): D. Arnold     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): SANS 40100 or approval of instructor

SANS 40300. Fourth-Year Sanskrit-3. 100 Units.

The goal of this sequence is to provide students with strong reading expertise in a wide range of Sanskrit texts in literature (poems and plays, verse and prose) and the scientific and philosophical discourses (e.g., grammar, logic, poetic theory, Buddhist thought), and commentarial literature on both.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SANS 40200 or approval of instructor

SANS 47900-47901-47902. Rdgs: Advanced Sanskrit I-II-III.

Readings drawn from texts at an advanced level of difficulty in any of the relevant genres of Sanskrit, including literature, philosophy, literary theory, and religion, for students who have already completed fourth-year Sanskrit.  Continuing attention is given to matters of grammar, style, scholastic techniques, and intellectual and cultural content.

SANS 47900. Readings: Advanced Sanskrit I. 100 Units.

Readings drawn from texts at an advanced level of difficulty in any of the relevant genres of Sanskrit, including literature, philosophy, literary theory, and religion, for students who have already completed fourth-year Sanskrit. Continuing attention is given to matters of grammar, style, scholastic techniques, and intellectual and cultural content.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): SANS 40300

SANS 47901. Advanced Readings in Sanskrit-2. 100 Units.

Readings drawn from texts at an advanced level of difficulty in any of the relevant genres of Sanskrit, including literature, philosophy, literary theory, and religion, for students who have already completed fourth-year Sanskrit. Continuing attention is given to matters of grammar, style, scholastic techniques, and intellectual and cultural content.

Instructor(s): D. Arnold     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): SANS 47900

SANS 47902. Readings: Advanced Sanskrit-3. 100 Units.

Readings drawn from texts at an advanced level of difficulty in any of the relevant genres of Sanskrit, including literature, philosophy, literary theory, and religion, for students who have already completed fourth-year Sanskrit. Continuing attention is given to matters of grammar, style, scholastic techniques, and intellectual and cultural content.

Equivalent Course(s): DVPR 41500

South Asian Languages and Civilizations Courses

SALC 30509. Bombay to Bollywood. 100 Units.

This course maps the transformation of the Hindi film industry in India. Starting out as a regional film production center, how did the Bombay film industry and Hindi cinema gain the reputation of being the leader of Indian cinema? This despite the fact that most critical acclaim, by the state and film critics, was reserved for "art cinema." Through an analysis of Hindi films from the 1950s to the present we map the main trends of this complex artistic/ industrial complex to arrive at an understanding of the deep connect between cinema and other social imaginaries.

Instructor(s): R. Majumdar     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 26709, GNSE 20509, CMST 24107, CMST 34107, SALC 20509, HIST 36709

SALC 30511. Screening India: Bollywood and Beyond. 100 Units.

Cinema is, unarguably, the medium most apposite for thinking through the complexities of democratic politics, especially so in a place like India. While Indian cinema has recently gained international currency through the song and dance ensembles of Bollywood, there remains much more to be said about that body of films. Moreover, Bollywood is a small (though very important) part of Indian cinema. Through a close analysis of a wide range of films in Hindi, Bengali, Kannada, and Urdu, this course will ask if Indian cinema can be thought of as a form of knowledge of the twentieth century.

Instructor(s): R.Majumdar     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CMST 24112, HIST 26808, SALC 20511, KNOW 24112, HIST 36808, KNOW 34112, CMST 34112

SALC 30722. Colonialisms and Literature: Adventures, Exoticisms, East and West. 100 Units.

European imperialism and colonialism have shaped the modern world as we know it today. The "Age of Empire" has bequeathed us a wealth of literary texts, from adventure tales to more serious novels about colonial encounters and life in the colonies. Colonialism also introduced the novel as a new literary genre to many literatures in Asia. Over the past decades literary critics, theorists, historians and philosophers have examined the interdependence of imperialism/colonialism and literature from many perspectives, notably in what is generally referred to as postcolonial theory. The present course provides a first introduction to to colonial writing and theoretical approaches to literary practices under colonialism, to its key thinkers, concepts and methods by examining what Empire was in the case of British India and the Dutch East Indies (today's Indonesia) and by reading English and Dutch novels together with the work of Asian writers (Forster, Rajam Aiyar, Couperus, Abdoel Moeis). We will explore key terms, such as "otherness", "hybridity", "agency", "modernity", "nationalism" as well as larger themes, such as empire and gender and sexuality or colonial knowledge formation. - Of interest to students of literature, history, anthropology and other disciplines dealing with 'texts'. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students; No prior knowledge of literary theory or South or Southeast Asian writing assumed.

Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 30702, SALC 20722, CMLT 20702

SALC 30800. Music of South Asia. 100 Units.

The course explores some of the music traditions that hail from South Asia-a region defined by the countries of India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan, Afghanistan, Maldives, and their diasporas. The course will study music and some of its inextricably linked forms of dance and theatre through the lens of ethnomusicology, where music is considered in its social and cultural contexts. Students will develop tools to listen, analyze, watch, and participate in South Asian forms of music-making, using case-study based inquiries as guides along the way.

Instructor(s): Ameera Nimjee     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): MUSI 33706, SALC 20800, MUSI 23706, RLST 27700

SALC 30901-30902. Indian Philosophy I-II.

SALC 30901. Indian Philosophy I: Origins and Orientations. 100 Units.

A survey of the origins of Indian philosophical thought, emphasizing the Vedas, Upanisads, and early Buddhist literature. Topics include concepts of causality and freedom, the nature of the self and ultimate reality, and the relationship between philosophical thought and ritual or ascetic religious practice.

Instructor(s): D. Arnold     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HREL 30200, SALC 20901, RLST 24201, DVPR 30201

SALC 30902. Indian Philosophy II: The Classical Traditions. 100 Units.

Following on the Indian Philosophy I course, this course will survey major developments in the mature period of scholastic philosophy in India - a period, beginning a little before the middle of the first millennium C.E., that is characterized by extensive and sophisticated debate (made possible by the emergence of shared philosophical vocabulary and methods) among Buddhist, Brahmanical, and Jain philosophers. Students are encouraged (but not required) to take Indian Philosophy I before taking this course.

Instructor(s): M. Kapstein     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): DVPR 30302, MDVL 24202, RLST 24202, SALC 20902, HREL 30300

SALC 30927. Knowledge as a Platter: Comparative Perspectives on Knowledge Texts in the Ancient World. 100 Units.

In various ancient cultures, sages created the new ways of systematizing what was known in fields as diverse as medicine, politics, sex, dreams, and mathematics. These texts did more than present what was known; they exemplified what it means to know - and also why reflective, systematic knowledge should be valued more highly than the knowledge gained from common sense or experience. Drawing on texts from Ancient India, Greece, Rome, and the Near East, this course will explore these early templates for the highest form of knowledge and compare their ways of creating fields of inquiry: the first disciplines. Texts include the Arthashastra, the Hippocratic corpus, Deuteronomy, the Kama Sutra, and Aristotle's Parva naturalia.

Equivalent Course(s): CHSS 30927, SCTH 30927, KNOW 31415, HREL 30927

SALC 32605. A Poem in Every House": An Introduction to Premodern South Asian Literatures 2. 100 Units.

100gehe gehe kalau kāvyaṃ … In the Kali age, there is a poem in every house … (Vidyāpati [ca. 1370-1460, Mithila], Kīrtilatā). The Indian subcontinent was home to some of the most vibrant literary traditions in world history. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the main trends in the premodern (/pre-nineteenth century) literatures of South Asia through a selection of poetic and theoretical texts translated from a variety of languages. We will discuss issues of literary historiography, the relations between orality and writing, literary and visual representations, poetry and music. Over two quarters, we will review the basic principles of Sanskrit, Dravidian, and Perso-Arabic poetics through a selection of representative theoretical treatises and poems. We will also explore the linguistic ecology of the Subcontinent, the formation of vernacular literary traditions, multilingual literacy, and the role of literature in social interactions and community building in premodern South Asia. Every week the first class will be devoted to the historical context and conceptual background of the texts we will read in the following class. Attention will be given to the original languages in which those texts were composed as well as the modes of performance of the poems and songs we will read together.

Instructor(s): Thibaut d'Hubert     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): The course is the perfect complement to the Introduction to South Asian Civilizations sequence (SALC 20100-20200). Beyond its focus on South Asia, students interested in classics, poetics, rhetoric, musicology, theater studies, and comparative literature will find plenty of food for thought in the readings, lectures, and class discussions. For students interested in languages, it is an ideal way to have a lively introduction to the linguistic variety of South Asia. No prior knowledge of South Asian languages is required.
Note(s): One session titled “Poetry Carved in Stones” will bring us to the Art Institute to study the relation between poetic and visual representations of gods and episodes drawn from the rich narrative tradition of South Asia. The first part of this sequence is devoted to Sanskrit, Middle Indic (Prakrit, Apabhramsha), and Dravidian (Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam) literary traditions. Perso-Arabic (Persian, Dakani, Urdu) and northern vernacular literary traditions (Hindi, Panjabi, Maithili, Bengali) will be discussed in the Autumn Quarter of the following year. Students may take the courses in any order.
Equivalent Course(s): SALC 22604, MDVL 22604

SALC 33101. Love, Conjugality, and Capital: Intimacy in the Modern World. 100 Units.

A look at societies in other parts of the world demonstrates that modernity in the realm of love, intimacy, and family often had a different trajectory from the European one. This course surveys ideas and practices surrounding love, marriage, and capital in the modern world. Using a range of theoretical, historical, and anthropological readings, as well as films, the course explores such topics as the emergence of companionate marriage in Europe and the connections between arranged marriage, dowry, love, and money. Case studies are drawn primarily from Europe, India, and Africa.

Instructor(s): J. Cole, R. Majumdar     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Any 10000-level music course or consent of instructor
Note(s): This course typically is offered in alternate years.
Equivalent Course(s): SALC 43101, CRES 23101, CHDV 22212, ANTH 32220, ANTH 21525, GNSE 23102, HIST 26903, CRES 33101, GNSE 31700, HIST 36903, CHDV 33212

SALC 33700. How to do Things with South Asian Texts? Literary Theories and South Asian Literatures. 100 Units.

This course provides an overview of different methods, approaches and themes currently prevalent in the study of South Asian texts from various periods. Topics covered will include translation (theory and practice), book history, literary history, textual criticism, genre theory (the novel in South Asia), literature and colonialism, cultural mobility studies (Greenblatt) and comparative literature/new philologies (Spivak, Ette). Readings will include work by George Steiner, Sheldon Pollock, Meenakshi Mukherjee, Terry Eagleton, Stephen Greenblatt, Gayatri Spivak, Ottmar Ette, and others. We will discuss these different approaches with particular reference to the texts with which participating students are working for their various projects. Students interested in both pre-modern and modern/contemporary texts are welcome. While the course is organized primarily from a literary studies perspective, it will also be of interest to students of history, anthropology and other disciplines dealing with "texts". The course is open to both undergraduate and graduate students (no prior knowledge of literary theory or South Asian writing is assumed).

Instructor(s): Sascha Ebeling     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 33700

SALC 36611. Empires, Imperialism, and Islam. 100 Units.

This seminar course will survey interactions between empires and Islam from the early nineteenth century to the early twenty-first century. It will consider the varied responses of Islamic polities to the expansion of European empires, their role in proliferating networks of travel and communication, as well as the place of religion in anti-imperial and anticolonial movements. Geographically we will cover Asia very broadly defined: from the Ottoman Empire in the west, through the Middle East and Central and South Asia, to Indonesia and Malaysia to the east. Individual classes will focus, for instance, on imperial connections, the emergence of pan-Islamism, Sufi networks, oceanic travel, subaltern social and political movements, and Cold War-era Muslim ideologues. The course will conclude with a look at the rise of more militant Islamic ideologies in recent years. Investigating this two-century long history will help students understand the complex role that Islam has played in the making of the modern world. Course readings will be on the whole recent scholarship on these subjects, with key primary texts introduced in class.

Equivalent Course(s): HIST 36611, SALC 26611, HIST 26611

SALC 37701. Mughal India: Tradition & Transition. 100 Units.

The focus of this course is on the period of Mughal rule during the late sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries, especially on selected issues that have been at the center of historiographical debate in the past decades.

Instructor(s): M. Alam     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Advanced standing or consent of instructor. Prior knowledge of appropriate history and secondary literature required.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 36602, HIST 26602, NEHC 20570, SALC 27701, NEHC 30570

SALC 38000. Introduction to Prakrit. 100 Units.

SALC 39001. Tibetan Buddhism. 100 Units.

This course is designed to serve as an introductory survey of the history, doctrines, institutions, and practices of Buddhism in Tibet from its origins in the mid-first-millennium through the present. Readings will be drawn both from primary sources (in translation) and secondary and tertiary scholarly research.

Instructor(s): Christian Wedmeyer     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HREL 35200

SALC 39002. Tibet: Culture, Art, and History. 100 Units.

This class will introduce students to Tibetan civilization from pre-modernity to the present with an emphasis on literature, society, visual arts, and history. Attention will be paid to Tibet's relations with neighboring polities in South, East, and Central Asia, as well as distinctive indigenous practices. The course will cover a range of Tibetan cultural forms, highlighting pre-modern sciences of medicine, logic, and meditation, as well as contemporary developments in Tibetan modernity and the diaspora communities. Course materials will include primary sources in translation (e.g. Dunhuang manuscripts and other literature), contemporary scholarship, as well audio-visual materials. In addition to informed participation in course meetings/discussions, including regular, timely completion of reading assignments, students are expected to write two short (5-7pp) papers on topics assigned by the instructors. *All course readings will be available on electronic reserve via Canvas (http://canvas.uchicago.edu/)*

Instructor(s): Karma Ngodup and Christian K. Wedemeyer     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): SALC 29002

SALC 39502. South India 1300-1700: Persons, Politics, Perceptions. 100 Units.

Equivalent Course(s): HIST 26610, SALC 29502, NEHC 29502, NEHC 39502, HREL 39502, HIST 36610, ISLM 39502

SALC 39503. Deccan Days: Exploring South Indian Frontiers. 100 Units.

This SALC seminar, open to both undergraduates and graduate students, attempts a cultural-historical overview of the great Deccan plateau and its major languages, cultures, literary and artistic monuments, and driving historical forces and themes. It follows a broad chronological order but also seeks to juxtapose thematic and generic topics from distinct historical periods. Each class presents at least one major text in translation, keyed to the period and the topics examined. Given the wide scope of Deccani history, the seminar seeks to make good use of expertise in many fields by SALC faculty and can be classed as a Faculty Seminar.

Instructor(s): David Shulman     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Grades: On the basis of seminar papers and oral presentations.
Equivalent Course(s): SALC 29503

SALC 39700. Introduction to Buddhism. 100 Units.

This course will be an introduction to the ideas and meditative practices of the Theravada school of South and Southeast Asian Buddhism, from ancient to modern times. It will study both classical texts and modern ethnography.

Instructor(s): S. Collins     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): SALC 29700, CHDV 29701, RLST 26150, CHDV 39701, HREL 39700

SALC 39900. Informal Reading Course. 100 Units.

This is a specially designed course not normally offered as part of the curriculum that is arranged between a student and a faculty member.

Instructor(s): Student chooses instructor     Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring,Winter
Note(s): Requires consent of instructor

SALC 39910. Readings in Middle Bengali literature. 100 Units.

This informal reading course focuses on the methods of textual criticism in the domain of Middle Bengali. We will read various texts from manuscripts, transcribe them, analyze their content at the linguistic and stylistic levels, and translate them into English. Although the primary aim of the course is to familiarize students with the close reading of Middle Bengali poetry, we will also discuss questions of literary historiography and poetics.

Instructor(s): Thibaut d'Hubert     Terms Offered: Autumn

SALC 39920. Readings in Indo-Persian Literature. 100 Units.

In this course we will read Persian texts produced in South Asia between the 12th and 19th centuries. The texts under scrutiny will be lyric and narrative poems, treatises on grammar and poetics, and biographical dictionaries of poets.

Instructor(s): Thibaut d'Hubert     Terms Offered: Autumn

SALC 40002. Sem: Postcolonial Theory. 100 Units.

SALC 40100. Research Themes I. 100 Units.

This course will focus on the intellectual traffic over the last several decades between postcolonial theory/criticism and the field of South Asian history. Scholarship bearing on questions of modernity, transition to capitalism, critiques of nationalism and the nation, caste and inequality, globalization, and other related issues will be discussed in class.

Equivalent Course(s): HIST 61802

SALC 42117. A Global Sonic History in 30 Objects. 100 Units.

Students will draw upon the wide range of disciplinary perspectives that contribute to sound studies. Collectively they will use these to understand the historical meaning present in the materiality of what we call the "audio moment." Critical to the audio moment is the transformation from object to subject, from the material to the sonic. These transformations unleash meaning and generate the multiple subjectivities from which history emerges. Basic ontologies will be challenged in our consideration of each object. The objects we consider are largely not primarily associated with music alone, but through their transformation into audio moments we are often able to understand just where music situates them in the human subjectivities of different societies. In addition to its interdisciplinarity this CDI seminar will be broadly comparative and will draw upon diverse sources and collections for its objects (e.g., with visits to urban and architectural spaces on campus, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Digital Media Archive). The goal of such comparative investigation is not to undo ontological assumptions about the dialectics of music/sound, but rather to use the collective thought that grows from the seminar participants to generate new approaches to the aesthetics and epistemology of sound and history globally.

Equivalent Course(s): CMES 42117, MUSI 42117, CDIN 42117

SALC 42605. Intro to Premodern South Asian Lit: Courts, Poets, Power. 100 Units.

The Indian subcontinent and the surrounding areas were home to some of the most vibrant literary traditions in world history. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the main trends in the premodern (pre-nineteenth century) literatures of South Asia through a selection of texts translated from a variety of languages (Bengali, Hindi, Marathi, Persian, Sanskrit, Tamil, Telugu, Urdu, etc.). We will discuss issues of literary historiography, the relations between orality and writing, the basic principles of Dravidian, Sanskrit, and Perso-Arabic poetics, the formation of vernacular literary traditions, multilingual literacy, and the role of literature in social interactions and community building in premodern South Asia. Each reading will thus be framed by the systematic exploration of those poetic systems and a close reading of representative texts. Attention will also be given to the original languages in which those texts were composed. The course offers a comprehensive and critical introduction to major non-western knowledge systems and aesthetic theories.

Instructor(s): T. D'Hubert     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): SALC 22603

SALC 43101. Love, Conjugality, and Capital: Intimacy in the Modern World. 100 Units.

A look at societies in other parts of the world demonstrates that modernity in the realm of love, intimacy, and family often had a different trajectory from the European one. This course surveys ideas and practices surrounding love, marriage, and capital in the modern world. Using a range of theoretical, historical, and anthropological readings, as well as films, the course explores such topics as the emergence of companionate marriage in Europe and the connections between arranged marriage, dowry, love, and money. Case studies are drawn primarily from Europe, India, and Africa.

Instructor(s): J. Cole, R. Majumdar     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Any 10000-level music course or consent of instructor
Note(s): This course typically is offered in alternate years.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 23101, CHDV 22212, ANTH 32220, ANTH 21525, SALC 33101, GNSE 23102, HIST 26903, CRES 33101, GNSE 31700, HIST 36903, CHDV 33212

SALC 43105. Women's Rights, Cultural Nationalisms, and Moral Panics. 100 Units.

The discourse on women's rights, and more gradually the rights of transgender and intersex communities, has gained tremendous momentum globally in the last few decades. At the same time, in many parts of the world, these changes have been accompanied by moral panics over what such empowerment means for national "cultures." They have sometimes also resulted in violence against women and sexual minorities. In South Africa, for example, marriage rates have reached new lows and single mothers have become a highly visible social category, eligible for state relief through a newly-instated Child Support Grant. Their access to these new state privileges has been accompanied by increased social surveillance; South African men and elders accuse young mothers of abusing their rights, upending the moral order. Both Uganda and Kenya, where national constitutions guarantee gender quotas for elected politicians, have also recently passed national legislation that seeks to regulate women's clothing (i.e. the so-called "Miniskirt Bill" passed in Uganda in 2014). In India, women's increasing participation in the workforce and their visibility in public space, or couples who contract marriages across religious divides, have led to violent disciplining by other members of the community, sometimes in the name of a "love Jihad." Feminists and queer activists, however, are not mute in the face of such resistance. Instead they have sought new ways to make claims about their right to "public" space.

Equivalent Course(s): CHDV 30609, ANTH 35218, CDIN 43105, HIST 40101

SALC 43800. Wives, Widows, and Prostitutes: Hindi Literature and the "Women's Question" 100 Units.

From the early 19th century onward, the debate on the status of Indian women was an integral part of the discourse on the state of civilization, Hindu tradition, and social reform in colonial India. This course will explore how Indian authors of the late 19th and early 20th centuries engaged with the so-called "women's question." Caught between middle-class conservatism and the urge for social reform, Hindi and Urdu writers addressed controversial issues such as female education, child marriage, widow remarriage, and prostitution in their fictional and discursive writings. We will explore the tensions of a literary and social agenda that advocated the 'uplift' of women as a necessary precondition for the progress of the nation, while also expressing patriarchal fears about women's rights and freedom. The course is open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Basic knowledge of Hindi and/or Urdu is preferable, but not required. We will read works by Nazir Ahmad, Premcand, Jainendra Kumar, Mirza Hadi Ruswa, and Mahadevi Varma in English translation, and also look at texts used in Indian female education at the time.

Instructor(s): U. Stark     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor based on demonstrated knowledge of Hindi
Equivalent Course(s): GNSE 47900, GNSE 27902, SALC 27904

SALC 44701. Ritual in South Asian Buddhism. 100 Units.

This course will explore some ritual practices and theories of South Asian Buddhists in light of current theorization of ritual. What is it that Buddhists "actually" (physically and verbally) do? And, what do they say about what they do? Does what they do "mean" anything? If so, how? And, what significance might this have for anyone else? What happens when we consider these possibly meaningful forms of expression as "ritual?" Exemplaria will be drawn from India, Nepal, Burma and Tibet, with some comparative perspectives considered along the way.

Instructor(s): Christian Wedemeyer     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Some prior study of South Asian religions
Equivalent Course(s): HREL 44701

SALC 46903. History and Literature of Pakistan: Postcolonial Representations. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): C.R. Perkins     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): SALC 26903, NEHC 26903, HIST 26608

SALC 47302. Transmission of Islamic Knowledge in South Asia since 1800. 100 Units.

Equivalent Course(s): ISLM 37302, NEHC 37302, HIST 45904

SALC 48203. Buddhist Narratives. 100 Units.

This course will read and discuss stories translated mostly from Pali (with some from Sanskrit), on the topics of the Buddha's (extended) (Auto)biography, and the Past Lives of the Buddha (Jātakas) culminating in an analysis of various versions of the Vessantara (Viśvantara) Jātaka. Such stories will be considered also in light of the theory of the Ten Excellencies (Perfections. pāramī). It will also study some works on Narrative Theory, and on the difference between narrative and systematic thought, asking what different textual form makes to Buddhist ideas, ideals and values.

Instructor(s): S. Collins     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): PQ: Previous knowledge of Buddhism (at least one course)
Equivalent Course(s): HREL 48203

SALC 48306. Indian Buddhism. 100 Units.

This course is designed to serve as an introductory survey of the history, doctrines, institutions, and practices of Buddhism in India from its origins through the present. Readings will be drawn both from primary sources (in translation) and secondary and tertiary scholarly research.

Instructor(s): Christian Wedemeyer     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HREL 35100

SALC 48400. Second-year Sanskirt: Rdgs. in the Mahabharata. 100 Units.

This sequence begins with a rapid review of grammar learned in the introductory course, followed by readings from a variety of Sanskrit texts. The goals are to consolidate grammatical knowledge, expand vocabulary, and gain confidence in reading different styles of Sanskrit independently. The winter quarter will be a reading of the Mahabharata.

Instructor(s): W. Doniger     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): SANS 20100 or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): SANS 20200, HREL 36000

SALC 48403. Text and World in Medieval India. 100 Units.

SALC 48405. The Theory and Practice of Indic Textual Criticism. 100 Units.

This course will serve as an introduction to the methods of textual criticism, the practice of editorial philology, and the bibliographical nature of the critical edition as they are applicable to premodern South Asia, especially to works in Sanskrit, although other linguistic and textual cultures will also be considered. The titular difference between 'theory' and 'practice' is not meant as a cliché, and the two weekly sessions will be organized along distinct lines. In the first meeting, we will read, discuss, and present works that variously introduce, discuss, critique, and exemplify these sorts of textual practices. We will begin with some orientating works on philology more generally (e.g. the guidebooks of Paul Maas and Martin West; Housman's polemical essays; Timpanaro's study of Lachmann; Turner's recent popular history) and proceed to move into more South Asia specific materials from there, including classics (Sukthankar, Katre, M.R. Kavi) as well as contemporary discussions (Pollock, Alam, Kinra, Phillips-Rodriguez). Big questions will include: in what ways are the methods developed for the classical Mediterranean and European worlds applicable to other textual cultures? In what ways does this constitute a specifically 'scientific' (i.e. transparent, falsifiable) practice of knowledge? What can be said of the institutional motivations for the production of critical editions, in India or elsewhere?

Instructor(s): Whitney Cox     Terms Offered: Autumn

SALC 48501. Readings in Tibetan Buddhist Texts. 100 Units.

Readings in selected Buddhist doctrinal writings in Tibetan.

Instructor(s): Matthew Kapstein     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Open to students reading Tibetan at an advanced level.
Equivalent Course(s): HREL 48910, DVPR 48910

SALC 48603. Talking Birds and Cunning Jackals: A Survey of Indo-Persian Prose. 100 Units.

Prerequisites: intermediate level of Persian. This course features a selection of Persian prose texts such as tales, premodern translations of romance and epic texts on Indian themes (Mahābhārata, Rāmāyaṇa, Pañcatantra, etc…), letters, models of elegant prose writings, and anecdotes from chronicles, tadhkira literature, and autobiographical writings. We will first read easy, plain prose texts, such as Naqīb Khān's translation of the Mahābhārata commissioned by Akbar, which will allow the students to familiarize themselves with the cultural context of South Asia. Then, toward the middle of the quarter we will shift to increasingly difficult texts to reach the characteristically ornate prose of the Mughal period, such as ʿInāyat Allāh Kambūh's Bahār-i dānish or Bedil's Chahār ʿunṣur. Students with an intermediate level of Persian will thus be able to take this class and then, the following year, be ready to attend the more challenging course titled "Persian Philology and Poetry in South Asia" offered every other year, alternately with the present survey of Indo-Persian prose. Thibaut d'Hubert and Muzaffar Alam, Spring 2018

Equivalent Course(s): PERS 48693, NEHC 48603

SALC 49006. Yogacara. 100 Units.

This seminar, which presupposes a basic knowledge of Indian and/or Tibetan Buddhist philosophy, will consider some of the foundational texts of the Yogacara tradition of thought, with particular reference to the works of Vasubandhu. In addition to close readings of assorted primary sources, we will consider contemporary scholarly debates regarding the interpretation of Yogacara (e.e., concerning the question whether this is aptly characterized as an "idealist" school of thought).

Instructor(s): Dan Arnold     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Some knowledge of Sanskrit or Tibetan is preferred.
Equivalent Course(s): DVPR 51700

SALC 49300. South Asian Aesthetics: Rasa to Rap, Kamasutra to Kant. 100 Units.

This course introduces students to the rich traditions of aesthetic thought in South Asia, a region that includes (among others) the modern-day states of India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Nepal and Sri Lanka. By engaging with theories of art, literature and music from the Indic and Indo-Persian traditions, we will attempt to better understand what happens in an aesthetic experience. A central concern will be thinking about how much any aesthetic tradition, be it South Asian or other, is rooted in the particular epistemic and cultural values of the society that produced it; we will therefore explore how ideas from the South Asian tradition can help us to understand not only South Asian material, but art in other societies as well, and to re-think the boundaries of 'aesthetic' thought. Class discussion, small group work, and individual presentations will be regular features of the class. Two sessions will include performances by, and discussions with, performing artists (dancers and musicians). We will also make one visit to the Art Institute Chicago.

Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 29302, SALC 29300, CMLT 39302

SALC 49301. Asceticism and Civilization. 100 Units.

This course examines the phenomenon of asceticism (it is better to use the Greek word askēsis) -a disciplined life-style (usually) involving celibacy, lack of individual wealth, obedience to a rule, etc.- in relation to human civilization. How is it that this way of life, which in many ways challenges basic elements of normal social existence, is nonetheless often accorded a central civilizational position and value? In addition to works of theory, material on both men and women ascetics will be investigated, in the Hindu and Jain traditions in India, Buddhism in Southeast Asia, Taiwan, and Japan, Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy, and Christianity and Catharism in Europe.

Instructor(s): S. Collins     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HREL 49301

SALC 49404. Colloquium: Historical Time and the Anthropocene. 100 Units.

The course will review debates in the social sciences and the humanities on the idea of a new geological age of the humans, the so-called Anthropocene, and discuss their implications for historiography and historical thinking.

Instructor(s): D. Chakrabarty     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Upper-level undergraduates by consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): CHSS 49404, HIST 49404

SALC 49900. Thesis Research. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): Student chooses instructor     Terms Offered: Autumn,Winter,Spring
Note(s): Requires consent of instructor

SALC 50204. Destruction of Images, Books & Artifacts in Europe and S. Asia. 100 Units.

The course offers a comparative perspective on European and South Asian iconoclasm. In the European tradition, iconoclasm was predominantly aimed at images, whereas in South Asian traditions it was also enacted upon books and buildings. The combination of these traditions will allow us to extend the usual understanding of iconoclasm as the destruction of images to a broader phenomenon of destruction of cultural artifacts and help question the theories of image as they have been independently developed in Europe and South Asia, and occasionally in conversation with one another. We will ask how and why, in the context of particular political imaginaries and material cultures, were certain objects singled out for iconoclasm? Also, who was considered to be entitled or authorized to commit their destruction? Through a choice of concrete examples of iconoclasm, we will query how religious and political motivations are defined, redefined, and intertwined in each particular case. We will approach the iconoclastic events in Europe and South Asia through the lenses of philology, history, and material culture. Class discussions will incorporate not only textual materials, but also the close collaborative study of images, objects, and film. Case studies will make use of objects in the Art Institute of Chicago and Special Collections at the University Library.

Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 50204, CDIN 50204, ARTH 40204, RLVC 50204, SCTH 50204, HREL 50204

SALC 60100. Teaching South Asia. 100 Units.

Teaching South Asia will be a Workshop open to students in their second year of their graduate program or above, who are now or who expect to be teaching any kinds of course in the area(s) of South Asian Studies in the future. It is intended for all students in the University, and will not have a specific Humanities focus. In the past we have discussed actual or draft syllabuses, students have given trial lectures, conference or job talks, we have run mock job interviews, etc. What happens this year will depend on what students want. Students who have attended the workshop before will be allowed to take it again.

Instructor(s): S. Collins     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Second year as a graduate student or beyond.

SALC 61805. Colloquium: South Asian Political Thought-A Genealogy. 100 Units.

This course will look at some key texts of the colonial and postcolonial periods of South Asian history to see how the domain of the political has been understood and debated in the subcontinent since the beginning of the twentieth century.

Equivalent Course(s): HIST 61805

SALC 70000. Advanced Study: South Asian Languages & Civilizations. 300.00 Units.

Advanced Study: South Asian Languages & Civilizations

Tamil Courses

TAML 30100-30200-30300. Third-Year Tamil I-II-III.

On the basis of a variety of readings, such as short stories, poems, excerpts from novels or non-fiction, this course addresses those issues of modern written Tamil grammar which have not been covered during the previous two years. Readings are typically selected with a view to providing important cultural information, and they are supplemented by film clips and other media. Class content may be chosen or adapted based on particular student needs. Further work on listening and speaking proficiency is also part of the course. Based on prior consultation with instructor regarding placement, this course might be an appropriate starting point for speakers of Tamil with previous knowledge (e.g., heritage students).

TAML 30100. Third-Year Tamil-1. 100 Units.

On the basis of a variety of readings, such as short stories, poems, excerpts from novels or non-fiction, this course addresses those issues of modern written Tamil grammar which have not been covered during the previous two years. Readings are typically selected with a view to providing important cultural information, and they are supplemented by film clips and other media. Class content may be chosen or adapted based on particular student needs. Further work on listening and speaking proficiency is also part of the course. Based on prior consultation with instructor regarding placement, this course might be an appropriate starting point for speakers of Tamil with previous knowledge (e.g., heritage students). Prerequisite(s): TAML 20300 or comparable level of language skills. Prior consent of instructor required.

Instructor(s): E.Annamalai     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): TAML 20300 or comparable level of language skills. Prior consent of instructor required.

TAML 30200. Third-Year Tamil-2. 100 Units.

On the basis of a variety of readings, such as short stories, poems, excerpts from novels or non-fiction, this course addresses those issues of modern written Tamil grammar which have not been covered during the previous two years. Readings are typically selected with a view to providing important cultural information, and they are supplemented by film clips and other media. Class content may be chosen or adapted based on particular student needs. Further work on listening and speaking proficiency is also part of the course. Based on prior consultation with instructor regarding placement, this course might be an appropriate starting point for speakers of Tamil with previous knowledge (e.g., heritage students).

Instructor(s): S. Ebeling     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): TAML 30100 or comparable level of language skills. Prior consent of instructor required.

TAML 30300. Third-Year Tamil-3. 100 Units.

On the basis of a variety of readings, such as short stories, poems, excerpts from novels or non-fiction, this course addresses those issues of modern written Tamil grammar which have not been covered during the previous two years. Readings are typically selected with a view to providing important cultural information, and they are supplemented by film clips and other media. Class content may be chosen or adapted based on particular student needs. Further work on listening and speaking proficiency is also part of the course. Based on prior consultation with instructor regarding placement, this course might be an appropriate starting point for speakers of Tamil with previous knowledge (e.g., heritage students).

Instructor(s): E.Annamalai     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): TAML 30200 or comparable level of language skills. Prior consent of instructor required.

TAML 40100-40200-40300. Fourth-Year Tamil I-II-III.

This course typically includes an introduction to Classical Tamil grammar and literature, with sample readings reaching from the oldest known Tamil literature (Sangam poetry) via bhakti poems to the magnificent courtly compositions of the high and late medieval periods. Various other types of linguistic variation may also be studied, e.g. inscriptional Tamil or dialects/regional language registers. Depending on the students’ needs, an overview of Tamil literary history is also given. Native or heritage speakers of Tamil are required to have a solid knowledge of modern Tamil grammar.

TAML 40100. Fourth-Year Tamil-1. 100 Units.

This course typically includes an introduction to Classical Tamil grammar and literature, with sample readings reaching from the oldest known Tamil literature (Sangam poetry) via bhakti poems to the magnificent courtly compositions of the high and late medieval periods. Various other types of linguistic variation may also be studied, e.g. inscriptional Tamil or dialects/regional language registers. Depending on the students' needs, an overview of Tamil literary history is also given. Native or heritage speakers of Tamil are required to have a solid knowledge of modern Tamil grammar. Prerequisite(s): TAML 30300 or comparable level of language skills. Prior consent of instructor required.

Instructor(s): E. Annamalai     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): TAML 30300 or comparable level of language skills. Prior consent of instructor required.

TAML 40200. Fourth-Year Tamil-2. 100 Units.

This course typically includes an introduction to Classical Tamil grammar and literature, with sample readings reaching from the oldest known Tamil literature (Sangam poetry) via bhakti poems to the magnificent courtly compositions of the high and late medieval periods. Various other types of linguistic variation may also be studied, e.g. inscriptional Tamil or dialects/regional language registers. Depending on the students' needs, an overview of Tamil literary history is also given. Native or heritage speakers of Tamil are required to have a solid knowledge of modern Tamil grammar.

Instructor(s): S. Ebeling     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): TAML 40100 or comparable level of language skills. Prior consent of instructor required.

TAML 40300. Fourth-Year Tamil-3. 100 Units.

This course typically includes an introduction to Classical Tamil grammar and literature, with sample readings reaching from the oldest known Tamil literature (Sangam poetry) via bhakti poems to the magnificent courtly compositions of the high and late medieval periods. Various other types of linguistic variation may also be studied, e.g. inscriptional Tamil or dialects/regional language registers. Depending on the students' needs, an overview of Tamil literary history is also given. Native or heritage speakers of Tamil are required to have a solid knowledge of modern Tamil grammar.

Instructor(s): E. Annamalai     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): TAML 40200 or comparable level of language skills. Prior consent of instructor required.

TAML 47900-47901-47902. Rdgs: Advanced Tamil; Rdgs: Advanced Tamil II-III.

This course is for students who have successfully completed third- and fourth-year Tamil. It is typically tailored to student needs in terms of the selection of texts to be addressed and discussed. Depending on their interest, students may choose to read Tamil texts from any time period, country or genre. Prior consent of instructor is required.

TAML 47900. Rdgs: Advanced Tamil. 100 Units.

This course is for students who have successfully completed third- and fourth-year Tamil. It is typically tailored to student needs in terms of the selection of texts to be addressed and discussed. Depending on their interest, students may choose to read Tamil texts from any time period, country or genre. Prior consent of instructor is required. Prerequisite(s): TAML 40300

Instructor(s): E. Annamalai     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): TAML 40300

TAML 47901. Advanced Readings in Tamil -2. 100 Units.

This course is for students who have successfully completed third- and fourth-year Tamil. It is typically tailored to student needs in terms of the selection of texts to be addressed and discussed. Depending on their interest, students may choose to read Tamil texts from any time period, country or genre. Prior consent of instructor is required.

Instructor(s): S. Ebeling     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): TAML 47900

TAML 47902. Readings: Advanced Tamil -3. 100 Units.

This course is for students who have successfully completed third- and fourth-year Tamil. It is typically tailored to student needs in terms of the selection of texts to be addressed and discussed. Depending on their interest, students may choose to read Tamil texts from any time period, country or genre. Prior consent of instructor is required.

Instructor(s): E. Annamalai     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): TAML 47901

TAML 47904. The Metrical Language of Tamil Poetry. 100 Units.

This will be a lecture cum workshop. It will trace the history of the prosody used in Tamil literary works from the beginning to the modern from the points of its grammar, development and the demands on it from the emergence of new genres, literary themes and audience. The workshop part will consist of doing prosodic analysis of selected literary works.

Instructor(s): E. Annamalai     Terms Offered: Winter

Tibetan Courses

TBTN 30100-30200-30300. Third-Year Tibetan I-II-III.

The third- and fourth-year sequence is meant to expose students to a range of genres in Tibetan literature, including religious, historical, philosophical, scientific, and literary works. Instruction consists in guided readings, with continuing grammar review, practice in speaking, and application of philological methods.

TBTN 30100. Third Year Tibetan-1. 100 Units.

The third- and fourth-year sequence is meant to expose students to a range of genres in Tibetan literature, including religious, historical, philosophical, scientific, and literary works. Instruction consists in guided readings, with continuing grammar review, practice in speaking, and application of philological methods. Prerequisite(s): TBTN 20300 or consent of instructor

Instructor(s): C. Wedemeyer     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): TBTN 20300 or consent of instructor

TBTN 30200. Third-Year Tibetan-2. 100 Units.

The third- and fourth-year sequence is meant to expose students to a range of genres in Tibetan literature, including religious, historical, philosophical, scientific, and literary works. Instruction consists in guided readings, with continuing grammar review, practice in speaking, and application of philological methods.

Instructor(s): M. Kapstein     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): TBTN 30100 or consent of instructor

TBTN 30300. Third Year Tibetan-2. 100 Units.

The third- and fourth-year sequence is meant to expose students to a range of genres in Tibetan literature, including religious, historical, philosophical, scientific, and literary works. Instruction consists in guided readings, with continuing grammar review, practice in speaking, and application of philological methods.

Instructor(s): K. Ngodup     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): TBTN 30200 or consent of instructor

TBTN 40100-40200-40300. Fourth-Year Tibetan I-II-III.

The third- and fourth-year sequence is meant to expose students to a range of genres in Tibetan literature, including religious, historical, philosophical, scientific, and literary works. Instruction consists in guided readings, with continuing grammar review, practice in speaking, and application of philological methods.

TBTN 40100. Fourth-Year Tibetan I. 100 Units.

The third- and fourth-year sequence is meant to expose students to a range of genres in Tibetan literature, including religious, historical, philosophical, scientific, and literary works. Instruction consists in guided readings, with continuing grammar review, practice in speaking, and application of philological methods. Prerequisite(s): TBTN 30300 or consent of instructor

Instructor(s): C. Wedemeyer     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): TBTN 30300 or consent of instructor

TBTN 40200. Fourth-Year Tibetan II. 100 Units.

The third- and fourth-year sequence is meant to expose students to a range of genres in Tibetan literature, including religious, historical, philosophical, scientific, and literary works. Instruction consists in guided readings, with continuing grammar review, practice in speaking, and application of philological methods.

Instructor(s): M. Kapstein     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): TBTN 40100 or consent of instructor

TBTN 40300. Fourth-Year Tibetan III. 100 Units.

The third- and fourth-year sequence is meant to expose students to a range of genres in Tibetan literature, including religious, historical, philosophical, scientific, and literary works. Instruction consists in guided readings, with continuing grammar review, practice in speaking, and application of philological methods.

Instructor(s): K. Ngodup     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): TBTN 40200 or consent of instructor

TBTN 47900-47901-47902. Rdgs: Advanced Tibetan I-II-III.

Readings: Advanced Tibetan is for students who have successfully completed third year and fourth year or equivalent with placement test. The sequence is meant to expose students to a range of genres in Tibetan literature, including religious, historical, philosophical, scientific, and literary works. Instruction includes guided readings with continuing grammar review, practice in speaking, and application of philological methods.

TBTN 47900. Readings: Advanced Tibetan I. 100 Units.

Readings: Advanced Tibetan is for students who have successfully completed third year and fourth year or equivalent with placement test. The sequence is meant to expose students to a range of genres in Tibetan literature, including religious, historical, philosophical, scientific, and literary works. Instruction includes guided readings with continuing grammar review, practice in speaking, and application of philological methods.

Instructor(s): C. Wedemeyer     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): TBTN 40300

TBTN 47901. Readings: Advanced Tibetan II. 100 Units.

Readings: Advanced Tibetan is for students who have successfully completed third year and fourth year or equivalent with placement test. The sequence is meant to expose students to a range of genres in Tibetan literature, including religious, historical, philosophical, scientific, and literary works. Instruction includes guided readings with continuing grammar review, practice in speaking, and application of philological methods.

Instructor(s): M. Kapstein     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): TBTN 47900

TBTN 47902. Readings: Advanced Tibetan III. 100 Units.

Readings: Advanced Tibetan is for students who have successfully completed third year and fourth year or equivalent with placement test. The sequence is meant to expose students to a range of genres in Tibetan literature, including religious, historical, philosophical, scientific, and literary works. Instruction includes guided readings with continuing grammar review, practice in speaking, and application of philological methods.

Equivalent Course(s): HREL 52402

Urdu Courses

URDU 30100-30200-30300. Third-Year Urdu I-II-III.

This third- and fourth-year sequence consists of courses primarily in Urdu prose, meant for students who have already mastered the grammar and control vocabulary past the basic level. The two-year cycle includes passages/selections from noted Urdu writers from the late eighteenth through the twentieth century. The sequence has two major goals. The first goal is to emphasize training in comprehension, reading, writing, philology, and discussion (in Urdu). A second goal is to encourage analysis of the widely acknowledged masters of Urdu style by locating them within the larger context of early modern and modern South Asian social and intellectual history.

URDU 30100. Third-Year Urdu-1. 100 Units.

This third- and fourth-year sequence consists of courses primarily in Urdu prose, meant for students who have already mastered the grammar and control vocabulary past the basic level. The two-year cycle includes passages/selections from noted Urdu writers from the late eighteenth through the twentieth century. The sequence has two major goals. The first goal is to emphasize training in comprehension, reading, writing, philology, and discussion (in Urdu). A second goal is to encourage analysis of the widely acknowledged masters of Urdu style by locating them within the larger context of early modern and modern South Asian social and intellectual history.

Instructor(s): M. Alam     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): URDU 20300 or consent of instructor

URDU 30200. Third-Year Urdu-2. 100 Units.

PQ: Second year Urdu or comparable level of language skills. The third- and fourth-year sequence consists of courses primarily in Urdu prose, meant for students who have already mastered the grammar and control vocabulary past the basic level. The two-year cycle includes passages/selections from noted Urdu writers from the late eighteenth through the twentieth century. The sequence has two major goals. The first goal is to emphasize training in comprehension, reading, writing, philology, and discussion (in Urdu). A second goal is to encourage analysis of the widely acknowledged masters of Urdu style by locating them within the larger context of early modern and modern South Asian social and intellectual history. Muzaffar Alam, Autumn-Winter-Spring.

Instructor(s): M. Alam     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): URDU 30100 or consent of instructor

URDU 30300. Third-Year Urdu-3. 100 Units.

PQ: Second year Urdu or comparable level of language skills. The third- and fourth-year sequence consists of courses primarily in Urdu prose, meant for students who have already mastered the grammar and control vocabulary past the basic level. The two-year cycle includes passages/selections from noted Urdu writers from the late eighteenth through the twentieth century. The sequence has two major goals. The first goal is to emphasize training in comprehension, reading, writing, philology, and discussion (in Urdu). A second goal is to encourage analysis of the widely acknowledged masters of Urdu style by locating them within the larger context of early modern and modern South Asian social and intellectual history. Muzaffar Alam, Autumn-Winter-Spring.

Instructor(s): M. Alam     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): URDU 30200 or consent of instructor

URDU 37100. Urdu in the 21st Century. 100 Units.

This course is intended to provide continued language teaching beyond the second-year course through reading and analysis of authentic contemporary materials. It differs from the regular third-year class/sequence in that it will focus on contemporary issues and texts (both print and electronic) rather than the literary canon. Readings will be selected by students and the instructor in consultation and will include a variety of genres and subject matter – to be determined by the fields of interest/research of the students enrolled.

Instructor(s): E. Bashir     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Second year Urdu sequence or its equivalent, and permission of the instructor.

URDU 37200. Urdu in the 21st Century-2. 100 Units.

URDU 37300. URDU in the 21st Century. 100 Units.

URDU 40100-40200-40300. Fourth-Year Urdu I-II-III.

This third- and fourth-year sequence consists of courses primarily in Urdu prose, meant for students who have already mastered the grammar and control vocabulary past the basic level. The two-year cycle includes passages/selections from noted Urdu writers from the late eighteenth through the twentieth century. The sequence has two major goals. The first goal is to emphasize training in comprehension, reading, writing, philology, and discussion (in Urdu). A second goal is to encourage analysis of the widely acknowledged masters of Urdu style by locating them within the larger context of early modern and modern South Asian social and intellectual history.

URDU 40100. Fourth Year Urdu-1. 100 Units.

This third- and fourth-year sequence consists of courses primarily in Urdu prose, meant for students who have already mastered the grammar and control vocabulary past the basic level. The two-year cycle includes passages/selections from noted Urdu writers from the late eighteenth through the twentieth century. The sequence has two major goals. The first goal is to emphasize training in comprehension, reading, writing, philology, and discussion (in Urdu). A second goal is to encourage analysis of the widely acknowledged masters of Urdu style by locating them within the larger context of early modern and modern South Asian social and intellectual history.

Instructor(s): M. Alam
Prerequisite(s): URDU 30300 or consent of instructor

URDU 40200. Fourth-Year Urdu-2. 100 Units.

PQ: Third year Urdu or comparable level of language skills. The third- and fourth-year sequence consists of courses primarily in Urdu prose, meant for students who have already mastered the grammar and control vocabulary past the basic level. The two-year cycle includes passages/selections from noted Urdu writers from the late eighteenth through the twentieth century. The sequence has two major goals. The first goal is to emphasize training in comprehension, reading, writing, philology, and discussion (in Urdu). A second goal is to encourage analysis of the widely acknowledged masters of Urdu style by locating them within the larger context of early modern and modern South Asian social and intellectual history. Muzaffar Alam, Autumn-Winter-Spring.

Instructor(s): M. Alam
Prerequisite(s): URDU 40100 or consent of instructor

URDU 40300. Fourth-Year Urdu-3. 100 Units.

PQ: Third year Urdu or comparable level of language skills. The third- and fourth-year sequence consists of courses primarily in Urdu prose, meant for students who have already mastered the grammar and control vocabulary past the basic level. The two-year cycle includes passages/selections from noted Urdu writers from the late eighteenth through the twentieth century. The sequence has two major goals. The first goal is to emphasize training in comprehension, reading, writing, philology, and discussion (in Urdu). A second goal is to encourage analysis of the widely acknowledged masters of Urdu style by locating them within the larger context of early modern and modern South Asian social and intellectual history. Muzaffar Alam, Autumn-Winter-Spring.

Instructor(s): M. Alam
Prerequisite(s): URDU 40200 or consent of instructor

URDU 47900-47901-47902. Rdgs: Advanced Urdu I-II-III.

This course is for students who have successfully completed third- and fourth-year Urdu. It is typically tailored to student needs in terms of the selection of texts to be addressed and discussed. Depending on their interest, students may choose to read Urdu texts from any time period, country or genre. Prior consent of instructor is required.

URDU 47900. Readings: Advanced Urdu I. 100 Units.

This course is for students who have successfully completed third- and fourth-year Urdu. It is typically tailored to student needs in terms of the selection of texts to be addressed and discussed. Depending on their interest, students may choose to read Urdu texts from any time period, country or genre. Prior consent of instructor is required.

Instructor(s): M. Alam     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): URDU 40300

URDU 47901. Readings: Advanced Urdu II. 100 Units.

This course is for students who have successfully completed third- and fourth-year Urdu. It is typically tailored to student needs in terms of the selection of texts to be addressed and discussed. Depending on their interest, students may choose to read Urdu texts from any time period, country or genre. Prior consent of instructor is required.

Instructor(s): M. Alam     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): URDU 47900

URDU 47902. Readings: Advanced Urdu III. 100 Units.

This course is for students who have successfully completed third- and fourth-year Urdu. It is typically tailored to student needs in terms of the selection of texts to be addressed and discussed. Depending on their interest, students may choose to read Urdu texts from any time period, country or genre. Prior consent of instructor is required.

Instructor(s): M. Alam     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): URDU 47901