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Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations

http://nelc.uchicago.edu/

Chair

  • Franklin D. Lewis

Professors

  • Orit Bashkin
  • Fred M. Donner
  • Cornell Fleischer
  • McGuire Gibson, Oriental Institute
  • Janet H. Johnson, Oriental Institute
  • Hakan Karateke
  • Dennis G. Pardee
  • Robert K. Ritner, Oriental Institute
  • Tahera Qutbuddin
  • Martha T. Roth, Oriental Institute
  • David Schloen, Oriental Institute
  • Gil Stein, Oriental Institute
  • Theo P. van den Hout, Oriental Institute
  • Christopher Woods, Oriental Institute
  • John E. Woods, History

Associate Professors

  • Ahmed El Shamsy
  • Petra Goedegebuure, Oriental Institute
  • Rebecca Hasselbach, Oriental Institute
  • Nadine Moeller, Oriental Institute
  • Brian Muhs, Oriental Institute
  • Richard Payne, Oriental Institute
  • Na'ama Rokem
  • A. Holly Shissler
  • Sofía Torallas Tovar, Classics

Assistant Professors

  • Ghenwa Hayek
  • James Osborne, Oriental Institute
  • Susanne Paulus, Oriental Institute
  • Hervé Reculeau, Oriental Institute
  • Johh Z. Wee, Oriental Institute

Senior Lecturers

  • Ariela Almog
  • Saeed Ghahremani

Lecturers

  • Osama Abu-Eledam
  • Helga Anetshofer-Karateke
  • Kagan Arik
  • Lakhdar Choudar
  • Stuart Creason
  • Noha Forster
  • Saeed Ghahremani
  • Hripsime Haroutunian
  • Kay Heikkinen

Research Associates (Associate Professors)

  • W. Raymond Johnson, Oriental Institute
  • Donald S. Whitcomb, Oriental Institute

Emeritus Faculty

  • Lanny D. Bell, Oriental Institute
  • Robert D. Biggs, Oriental Institute
  • Menachem Brinker
  • John A. Brinkman, Oriental Institute
  • Richard L. Chambers
  • Miguel Civil, Oriental Institute
  • Robert Dankoff
  • Peter F. Dorman, Oriental Institute
  • Walter T. Farber, Oriental Institute
  • Gene B. Gragg, Oriental Institute
  • Norman Golb
  • Harry A. Hoffner, Oriental Institute
  • Halil Inalcik, History
  • Wadad Kadi
  • Heshmat Moayyad
  • John R. Perry
  • Jaroslav Stetkevych
  • Matthew W. Stolper, Oriental Institute
  • William Sumner, Oriental Institute
  • Edward F. Wente, Oriental Institute
  • K. Aslihan Yener, Oriental Institute

The Department

The work of the department encompasses the ancient civilizations of the Near East, Near Eastern Judaica, and the Islamic civilizations of the Middle East, including Egypt and North Africa, and the history, languages, and literatures of the modern Middle East.

The fields of study in which M.A. and Ph.D. programs are currently offered are, in the Ancient Section: Ancient Near Eastern History, Comparative Semitics, Cuneiform Studies (Assyriology, Hittitology, Sumerology), Egyptology, Hebrew Bible and the Ancient Near East, Near Eastern Art and Archaeology (Anatolian, Egyptian, Iranian, Islamic, Mesopotamian, Syro-Palestinian), Near Eastern Judaica, and Northwest Semitic Philology; and in the Medieval and Modern Section: Arabic Language and Literature, Islamic History and Civilization, Islamic Thought, Medieval Judaica and Judeo- Arabic, Modern Hebrew Language and Literature, Persian Language and Literature, and Ottoman and Turkish Studies. The department also has a joint program with Linguistics and offers courses in Armenian and Central Asian studies in collaboration with other departments at the University.

The department has two main objectives. First, it strives to provide the specific course work and training needed for its students to develop into outstanding scholars in their chosen fields. Second, it offers more general courses that provide its students a broader background in areas outside their specific fields while presenting students in other departments the opportunity to incorporate relevant Middle Eastern material into their own studies. The department also publishes the Journal of Near Eastern Studies, one of the leading academic journals in ancient Near Eastern and Islamic studies.

The Oriental Institute

The department is associated with the Oriental Institute, a research institute dedicated to the study of the origin and development of civilization in the ancient Near East. The Institute maintains several expeditions in the field, and research projects are carried on in its headquarters at the University. Its research archives, manuscript collection, documents from Oriental Institute excavations, and similar materials are resources for the students in the department. The department’s office is housed in the Oriental Institute building, and many of its members belong to the faculty of the Oriental Institute.

The Center for Middle Eastern Studies

The department is also associated with the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, which offers a master’s degree in Middle Eastern studies and coordinates activities at the University dealing with the Middle East in the Islamic and modern periods. Many members of the department faculty are also members of the Center’s executive committee; and the workshops, lectures, language circles, and similar activities of the Center are, like those of the Oriental Institute, a resource for the students in the department.

The Degree of Doctor of Philosophy

Students with an undergraduate degree may apply directly to the department’s Ph.D. program; a master’s degree in a related field is not prerequisite. The department does not admit students for a terminal M.A. degree, although work done in the first two years of the Ph.D. program qualifies students to receive an M.A. degree. This interim M.A. normally requires the completion of 18 courses, of which 15 must be taken for a quality grade while three may be taken on a pass/fail basis. All students must high pass one of the two required modern research language reading exams (typically French and German) before the beginning of their second year and complete an M.A. thesis in the second year.

At the end of the second year, all students are reviewed and a determination made as to whether they will be allowed to continue in the Ph.D. program. Students who do continue build upon the work used for the M.A. degree; normally the completion of additional 9-18 courses is required, depending on the field, before embarking upon research for the doctoral dissertation. Exact requirements vary by field, but all students must high pass their second modern research language reading exam before the beginning of their third year and pass a battery of comprehensive exams, usually at the end of their fourth year. A dissertation proposal of original research to be undertaken is presented to the faculty at a public hearing, usually in the fifth year; acceptance allows the student to be admitted to candidacy and to continue the research that will lead to the completed dissertation. A formal dissertation defense is required before the Ph.D. degree is awarded.  For more information, please consult the NELC Rules & Requirements.

Because the department believes that firsthand knowledge and experience of the Middle East are an essential part of a student’s training, advanced students are encouraged to apply for grants to support study in a Middle Eastern country, whether for language acquisition, archaeological field work, or dissertation research.

Inquiries

Specific information about the department and its programs may be obtained from our website (http://nelc.uchicago.edu/) or by e-mail (ne-lc@uchicago.edu). Within the framework outlined above, individual requirements are established for each student in consultation with the faculty adviser and the section counselor.

Application

The application process for admission and financial aid for all graduate programs in the Division of the Humanities is administered through the divisional Office of the Dean of Students. The Application for Admission and Financial Aid, with instructions, deadlines and department-specific information is available online at http://humanities.uchicago.edu/students/admissions.

Questions pertaining to admissions and aid should be directed to humanitiesadmissions@uchicago.edu or (773) 702-1552.

Foreign students must provide evidence of English proficiency by submitting scores from either the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS).

We encourage you to check our website at http://nelc.uchicago.edu/ particularly with regard to determining your field of study for your application. The application form has a place to indicate the department/program; from the pull down menu choose Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations. For field of specialization, please be sure to enter one of the fields of study exactly as listed on NELC’s web page. We need these fields to sort information in our database. You may wish to specify your area of interest further in your statement of purpose.

Courses

Modern Languages: Language acquisition is taught at the elementary and intermediate levels in modern Arabic, Armenian, Hebrew, Kazakh, Persian, Turkish, and Uzbek with advanced level courses in Arabic, Hebrew, and Turkish. A wide variety of literature courses are taught in the various languages.

Ancient Languages: Courses are offered in the fundamentals of Akkadian, Ancient Anatolian Languages, Egyptian, Ge’ez, Classical Hebrew, Sumerian, and Ugaritic, while more advanced courses cover specific genres of ancient texts dealing with religion, medicine, law, government, history, etc.

Near Eastern Art and Archaeology: Courses in Anatolian, Egyptian, Islamic, Mesopotamian, and Syro-Palestinian art and archaeology offer grounding in site archaeology and the material culture of the ancient Near East and include instruction on archaeological method and theory, landscape archaeology, computer applications, etc.

Near Eastern History and Civilization: A wide variety of courses cover the history, religion, law, literature (in translation), culture, and thought of the many ancient and modern civilizations of this region.

Please see the University’s Class Search for the most up-to-date and specific course offerings in a given quarter.

Akkadian Courses

AKKD 30375. Akkadian Literature - Late Period. 100 Units.

This course explores a variety of key issues in ancient narrative, by means of investigating the role of literature as history in the Erra Epic, features of orality or aurality such as verse, meter, and prosody in The Poor Man of Nippur, as well as the appropriation and reinterpretation of metaphors and other figurative imagery in Marduk's Address to the Demons and its ancient commentary.

Instructor(s): John Wee     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): One year of Akkadian

AKKD 30603. Intermediate Akkadian: Neo-Assyrian Royal Inscriptions. 100 Units.

This course is specifically aimed at students having completed the first year of Elementary Akkadian (AKKD 10101-10103), but can be taken by more advanced students as well. Building on the knowledge acquired in the Elementary sequence, this course will further explore the Standard Babylonian dialect and Neo-Assyrian Cuneiform scripts, through a detailed analysis of the Annals of king Sennacherib (704-681 BCE) as they are represented in the 'Chicago Prism' acquired by J. H. Breasted in 1920 and currently on display in the Assyrian gallery of the Oriental Institute Museum. These include, among other military and building exploits of the king, his campaign to the Levant against Ezekiah, king of Judah - an episode also recounted in the Hebrew Bible (books of Second Kings, Isaiah and Chronicles) and Josephus' Judean Antiquities.

Instructor(s): Herve Reculeau     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): 1 year of Elementary Akkadian
Equivalent Course(s): AKKD 20603

AKKD 30801. Reforms and Edicts of the Old Babylonian Kings. 100 Units.

This course covers Reforms and Edicts of the Old Babylonian Kings.

Instructor(s): Martha T. Roth     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 10103 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): AKKD 20801

AKKD 40200. War, Trade, and Curses: Akkadian Treaties. 100 Units.

Treaties written in Akkadian are one of the oldest surviving witnesses of international law. Furthermore, those texts give an insight in the organization of international trade, the treatment of fugitives, and state organization. The curse - an integral part to protect the legal arrangements - give us furthermore information about religion, fears and believes, and forms of divine punishments. In this class we will read and discuss selected treaties from different periods of Mesopotamian history: we will start with Old Babylonian and Old Assyrian documents, read texts from the so-called "International Age", and end with the Neo-Assyrian Succession Treaty of Esarhaddon.

Instructor(s): Susanne Paulus     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): "One year of Akkadian and Intermediate Akkadian.

AKKD 44000. Advanced Akkadian Syntax. 100 Units.

This class is designed to provide an advanced grammar course focusing on syntactic topics for students who have intermediate or advanced knowledge of Akkadian. The class will read texts from different periods and genres to compare the treatment of certain syntactic structures.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Hasselbach-Andee     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Akkadian

Ancient Anatolian Languages Courses

Arabic Courses

ARAB 30201-30202-30203. High Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic I-II-III.

This is a three course sequence in High Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic.

ARAB 30201. High Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic-1. 100 Units.

This is a three course sequence in High Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic. Prerequisite(s): ARAB 20103 or equivalent

Instructor(s): N. Forster     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): ARAB 20103 or equivalent
Note(s): Open to qualified undergraduates with consent of the instructor

ARAB 30202. High Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic-2. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): N. Forster     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARAB 30201 or equivalent

ARAB 30203. High Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic-3. 100 Units.

This course introduces the student to the language of Arabic media, both written and oral. Students will listen to and read a wide variety of authentic texts in modern standard Arabic, using these to continue to strengthen the four language skills and to become familiar with current issues discussed in today's Arab media. As the final course in the High Intermediate sequence, the course is meant for students who have completed at least two years of Arabic study and attained an Intermediate high level of proficiency.

Instructor(s): N. Forster     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARAB 30202 or equivalent

ARAB 30301-30302-30303. High Intermediate Classical Arabic I-II-III.

This is a three-segment course offered in three quarters; Autumn, Winter and Spring. The main objective of the complete three segment is to develop strong pedagogical strategies in the four Arabic language skills to acquire proficiency in handling Arabic classical texts. By the end of the three quarters students should  know the distinctive features of classical Arabic texts and the various genres and sources of such texts. They will build strong command on expanded grammatical features and structural rules governing classical texts of different variations. Students will be able to produce written documents reflecting reading comprehension, personal opinions and text critique. Students should be able to make oral presentation and conduct research using electronic resources as well as traditional classical sources. The class is conducted entirely in Arabic with occasional use of English in translation and explanation of complex cultural and linguistic issues.

ARAB 30301. High Intermediate Classical Arabic-1. 100 Units.

This is a three-segment course offered in three quarters; Autumn, Winter and Spring. The main objective of the complete three segment is to develop strong pedagogical strategies in the four Arabic language skills to acquire proficiency in handling Arabic classical texts. By the end of the three quarters students should know the distinctive features of classical Arabic texts and the various genres and sources of such texts. They will build strong command on expanded grammatical features and structural rules governing classical texts of different variations. Students will be able to produce written documents reflecting reading comprehension, personal opinions and text critique. Students should be able to make oral presentation and conduct research using electronic resources as well as traditional classical sources. The class is conducted entirely in Arabic with occasional use of English in translation and explanation of complex cultural and linguistic issues. Prerequisite(s): ARAB 20103 or equivalent

Instructor(s): K. Heikkinen     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): ARAB 20103 or equivalent

ARAB 30302. High Intermediate Classical Arabic-2. 100 Units.

The main objective of the complete three-quarter segment is to develop strong pedagogical strategies in the four Arabic language skills to acquire proficiency in handling Arabic classical texts. By the end of the three quarters students should know the distinctive features of classical Arabic texts and the various genres and sources of such texts. They will build strong command on expanded grammatical features and structural rules governing classical texts of different variations. Students will be able to produce written documents reflecting reading comprehension, personal opinions and text critique. Students should be able to make oral presentation and conduct research using electronic resources as well as traditional classical sources. The class is conducted entirely in Arabic with occasional use of English in translation and explanation of complex cultural and linguistic issues."

Instructor(s): K. Heikkinen     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARAB 30201 or equivalent

ARAB 30303. High Intermediate Classical Arabic-3. 100 Units.

The main objective of the complete three-quarter segment is to develop strong pedagogical strategies in the four Arabic language skills to acquire proficiency in handling Arabic classical texts. By the end of the three quarters students should know the distinctive features of classical Arabic texts and the various genres and sources of such texts. They will build strong command on expanded grammatical features and structural rules governing classical texts of different variations. Students will be able to produce written documents reflecting reading comprehension, personal opinions and text critique. Students should be able to make oral presentation and conduct research using electronic resources as well as traditional classical sources. The class is conducted entirely in Arabic with occasional use of English in translation and explanation of complex cultural and linguistic issues.

Instructor(s): K. Heikkinen     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARAB 30302 or equivalent

ARAB 30381. Introduction to Arabic Poetry. 100 Units.

The course is an introduction to the texts, contexts, functions, and rhythms of Arabic poetry. Students read, translate, and analyze the most eloquent verse of the Arabic poetic canon, with a view to understanding its themes, metaphors, and forms. In addition, they study the prosody and rhetoric that underpins these texts in order to acquire a feel for its music and aesthetics. The class is part lecture, part readings. Its focus is on the classical material, but modern poetry (MSA and colloquial) is also introduced.

Instructor(s): T. Qutbuddin     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): 2 years of Arabic or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): ISLM 30381

ARAB 30588. Media Arabic. 100 Units.

Media Arabic is a course designed for the advanced student of Modern Standard Arabic. The course objective is to improve students' listening comprehension skills. Students will advance toward this goal through listening to a variety of authentic materials from Arabic TV (on politics, literature, economics, education, women, youth, etc.).

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): At least two years of Modern Standard Arabic
Equivalent Course(s): ARAB 20588

ARAB 30800. Arabic for Heritage Learners. 100 Units.

This course is meant to prepare heritage speakers of Arabic to enter either Arabic 202 or Arabic 302 in the Winter Quarter. By "heritage" learners, we mean those students who know the alphabet, speak or have spoken Arabic at home, are familiar with a broad vocabulary but lack the grammatical underpinnings of Arabic, its case system, its structure, verb forms, etc. As such, the course will train students in listening, speaking, reading and writing in Modern Standard Arabic, but with an overt and systematic focus on grammar. Materials used will be authentic, up-to-date, and relevant to student interests.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn

ARAB 40200. Advanced Readings in Arabic. 100 Units.

Advanced Readings in Arabic

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter

ARAB 40356. The Modern Arabic Novel. 100 Units.

This is a graduate level survey course of the rise and development of the modern Arabic novel. It will cover texts from the nahḍa to the late twentieth century. We will read these texts with particular attention not only to the ways they engage the key social and political issues of their day, but also to the manner in which they probe central questions of form, genre, and language. By reading the novels alongside theoretical readings in English and Arabic that frame them, we will also interrogate the processes of the formation of the modern Arabic literary canon.

Instructor(s): Ghenwa Hayek     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): 3 years of Arabic at U of C or their equivalent.

ARAB 40629. Nahj al-balagha: Virtue and Piety in the Teachings of Ali. 100 Units.

Through a close reading and analysis of the orations, epistles and words of wisdom attributed to Ali ibn Abi Talib in the Nahj al-balagha, this course will explore an early stage of the development of these three important prose genres of classical Arabic literature, and Ali's key themes and stylistic features. A main focus of the class will be on themes of virtue and piety.

Instructor(s): Tahera Qutbuddin     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): 3 years of Arabic. Open to qualified undergraduates with Instructor's permission.
Equivalent Course(s): FNDL 22629, ISLM 40629

ARAB 40630. Balagha Seminar: Jurjani's Asrar al-Balagha & Dala'il al-I'jaz. 100 Units.

This course on classical Arabic literary theory will focus on close reading of sections from the seminal works of Abd al-Qahir al-Jurjani: Asrar al-balagha and Dala'il al-Ijaz.

Instructor(s): Tahera Qutbuddin     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): 3 years of Arabic. Open to qualified undergraduates with Instructor's permission.
Equivalent Course(s): ISLM 40631, FNDL 22630

Aramaic Courses

Armenian Courses

ARME 30101. Advanced Modern Armenian I. 100 Units.

This three-quarter sequence enables the students to reach an advanced level of proficiency in the Armenian language. Reading, discussion and writing assignments include a selection of original Armenian literature and excerpts from mass media. A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies and related area studies or to pursue work in Armenia.

Instructor(s): H. Haroutunian     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): ARME 20103 or equivalent.

ARME 30102. Advanced Modern Armenian II. 100 Units.

This three-quarter sequence enables the students to reach an advanced level of proficiency in the Armenian language. Reading, discussion and writing assignments include a selection of original Armenian literature and excerpts from mass media. A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies and related area studies or to pursue work in Armenia.

Instructor(s): H. Haroutunian     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARME 30101 or equivalent.

ARME 30103. Advanced Modern Armenian III. 100 Units.

This three-quarter sequence enables the students to reach an advanced level of proficiency in the Armenian language. Reading, discussion and writing assignments include a selection of original Armenian literature and excerpts from mass media. A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies and related area studies or to pursue work in Armenia.

Instructor(s): H. Haroutunian     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARME 30102 or equivalent.

Egyptian Courses

EGPT 30006. Ancient Near Eastern Thought & Literature-3. 100 Units.

This course employs English translations of ancient Egyptian literary texts to explore the genres, conventions and techniques of ancient Egyptian literature. Discussions of texts examine how the ancient Egyptians conceptualized and constructed their equivalent of literature, as well as the fuzzy boundaries and subtle interplay between autobiography, history, myth and fiction.

Instructor(s): Brian Muhs     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30006, NEHC 20006, EGPT 20006

EGPT 30120. Introduction to Demotic. 100 Units.

This course provides a basic introduction to the grammar, vocabulary, and orthographic styles of the administrative and literary stage of the Egyptian language and script used in the Late Period (into the Roman Empire).

Instructor(s): J. Johnson     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): EGPT 10201 and/or EGPT 20210
Equivalent Course(s): ANCM 32100

EGPT 30121. Demotic Texts. 100 Units.

Building on the basic grammar, vocabulary, and orthographic styles learned in EGPT 30120, this course focuses on the reading and analysis of various Demotic texts.

Instructor(s): Janet Johnson     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): EGPT 30120 or Consent of the Instructor

EGPT 45500. Coptic Dialects. 100 Units.

This course covers Dialects of Coptic.

Instructor(s): Robert Ritner     Terms Offered: Autumn

Courses

There are currently no courses offered in this subject.

Ge'ez Courses

There are currently no courses offered in this subject.

Hebrew Courses

HEBR 30001. Intensive Modern Hebrew I. 100 Units.

In this intensive, three-quarter sequence course student will gain skills corresponding to two full years of study. The course brings students to high-intermediate levels in all four skills: reading, writing, comprehension and grammar so that students can enter third-year level courses in Reading Modern Hebrew. With the main emphasis this course places on grammar, students that graduates this course successfully can enter third-year level courses in Reading Modern Hebrew.

Instructor(s): Ari L. Almog     Terms Offered: Autumn

HEBR 30002. Intensive Modern Hebrew II. 100 Units.

In this intensive, three-quarter sequence course student will gain skills corresponding to two full years of study. The course brings students to high-intermediate levels in all four skills: reading, writing, comprehension and grammar so that students can enter third-year level courses in Reading Modern Hebrew. With the main emphasis this course places on grammar, students that graduates this course successfully can enter third-year level courses in Reading Modern Hebrew.,In this intensive, three-quarter sequence course student will gain skills corresponding to two full years of study. The course brings students to high-intermediate levels in all four skills: reading, writing, comprehension and grammar so that students can enter third-year level courses in Reading Modern Hebrew. With the main emphasis this course places on grammar, students that graduates this course successfully can enter third-year level courses in Reading Modern Hebrew.

Instructor(s): Ari L. Almog     Terms Offered: Winter

HEBR 30003. Intensive Modern Hebrew III. 100 Units.

In this intensive, three-quarter sequence course student will gain skills corresponding to two full years of study. The course brings students to high-intermediate levels in all four skills: reading, writing, comprehension and grammar so that students can enter third-year level courses in Reading Modern Hebrew. With the main emphasis this course places on grammar, students that graduates this course successfully can enter third-year level courses in Reading Modern Hebrew.

Instructor(s): Ari L. Almog     Terms Offered: Spring

Kazakh Courses

Near Eastern Art and Archeology Courses

NEAA 30002. Archaeology of the Ancient Near East II: Anatolia. 100 Units.

Situated in the heart of the ancient Mediterranean, Anatolia lies at the crossroads of Mesopotamia, the Levant, Persia, Greece, and the Caucasus. Among Anatolia's mountains, plains, and rich river valleys, people first experimented with ideas like agriculture and monumental architecture that define human life around the world today. In this course, we will use the archaeological record to delve into the lives of the people of the hillside villages and magnificent cities of Anatolia, from the severed skull cult of the Pre-Pottery Neolithic and the regimented bureaucratization of the Late Chalcolithic, to the thousand gods of the Hittites and the mountain fortresses of Urartu. This material is well-suited for understanding the basis, in material flows and rhythms of daily life, of the development of religious and secular authority, large-scale violence, ideologies of domination, and resistance movements that played out again and again in the ever-changing cultural contexts of the region.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence does not meet the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence does not meet the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 20002

NEAA 30006. Archaeology of the Ancient Near East VI: Egypt. 100 Units.

This sequence provides a thorough survey in lecture format of the art and archaeology of ancient Egypt from the late Pre-dynastic era through the Roman period.

Instructor(s): N. Moeller     Terms Offered: Winter. Not offered in 2017-18
Note(s): This sequence does not meet the general education requirements in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 20006

NEAA 30011. Seminar: Seals in Ancient Near East,Sem: Seals in Ancient Near East. 100 Units.

This seminar focuses on Seals in Ancient Near East

Instructor(s): M. Gibson     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): NEAA 20001/30001
Note(s): Open to qualified undergraduates with instructor's consent

NEAA 30061. Ancient Landscapes I. 100 Units.

This is a two-course sequence that introduces students to theory and method in landscape studies and the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to analyze archaeological, anthropological, historical, and environmental data. Course one covers the theoretical and methodological background necessary to understand spatial approaches to landscape and the fundamentals of using ESRI's ArcGIS software, and further guides students in developing a research proposal. Course two covers more advanced GIS-based analysis (using vector, raster, and satellite remote sensing data) and guides students in carrying out their own spatial research project. In both courses, techniques are introduced through the discussion of case studies (focused on the archaeology of the Middle East) and through demonstration of software skills. During supervised laboratory times, the various techniques and analyses covered will be applied to sample archaeological data and also to data from a region/topic chosen by the student.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 26710, ANTH 36710, NEAA 20061, GEOG 35400, GEOG 25400

NEAA 30062. Ancient Landscapes II. 100 Units.

This is a two-course sequence that introduces students to theory and method in landscape studies and the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to analyze archaeological, anthropological, historical, and environmental data. Course one covers the theoretical and methodological background necessary to understand spatial approaches to landscape and the fundamentals of using ESRI's ArcGIS software, and further guides students in developing a research proposal. Course two covers more advanced GIS-based analysis (using vector, raster, and satellite remote sensing data) and guides students in carrying out their own spatial research project. In both courses, techniques are introduced through the discussion of case studies (focused on the archaeology of the Middle East) and through demonstration of software skills. During supervised laboratory times, the various techniques and analyses covered will be applied to sample archaeological data and also to data from a region/topic chosen by the student.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): NEAA 20061
Equivalent Course(s): GEOG 25800, GEOG 35800, ANTH 36711, ANTH 26711, NEAA 20062

NEAA 30071. Texts in Context: Documents and Archaeology. 100 Units.

This course investigates public and private buildings in which ancient records have been found in situ, seeking to find correlations based on architecture, artifacts, and the contents of texts. Often, in the past, the findspots of texts have not been meticulously recorded, resulting in the loss of valuable information on the function of specific buildings or even rooms in buildings; the layout of a building can also give information that can add significantly to the interpretation of the texts.

Instructor(s): McGuire Gibson     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 20071

NEAA 30091. Field Archaeology. 300 Units.

This course takes place outside of Chicago and can only be taken by arrangement with the instructor well in advance of the quarter in which it is offered.

Instructor(s): N. Moeller     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This course is for students that will be overseas participating in an Archaeological Field Project. Consent of instructor required.

NEAA 30131. Problems in Mesopotamian Archaeology. 100 Units.

This course examines specific issues relating to the archaeology of Mesopotamia. The content of the course in a given quarter will vary.

Instructor(s): M. Gibson     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): At least Intro to Mesopotamian Archeology AND Consent of Instructor.
Note(s): Open to qualified undergraduate students.

NEAA 30532. Problems in Islamic Archaeology: The Islamic City. 100 Units.

This course is intended to follow the Introduction to Islamic archaeology, a survey of the regions of the fertile crescent from the 9th to the 19th century. Beginning with P. Wheatley's Places where Men Pray Together, the institution of the Islamic are examined in light of its beginnings and definitions. Emphasis is on archaeological remains from the Middle East.

Instructor(s): D. Whitcomb     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent Only
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 20532

NEAA 30535. Problems in Islamic Archaeology: Archaeology of Travel. 100 Units.

This course focuses on the patterns and archaeological evidence for travel throughout the Islamic world. These patterns of movement are combined with evidence of trade essential for urban development, financial instruments, and industrial scale production among the many aspects of medieval Islamic cultures.

Instructor(s): Donald Whitcomb     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 20535

Near Eastern History and Civilizations Courses

NEHC 30004. Ancient Near Eastern Thought and Literature I: Mesopotamian Literature. 100 Units.

This course takes as its topic the literary tradition surrounding Gilgamesh, the legendary king of the Mesopotamian city-state of Uruk. The course will focus on the Babylonian Epic of Gilgamesh and its Sumerian forerunners, and their cultural and historical contexts. We will also read a number of Sumerian and Akkadian compositions that are thematically related to the Gilgamesh tradition, including Atrahasis, the Sumerian Flood story, and the Epics of Enmerkar and Lugalbanda, also of first dynasty of Uruk.

Instructor(s): Susanne Paulus     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 20004

NEHC 30005. Ancient Near Eastern Thought & Literature-2: Anatolian Lit. 100 Units.

This course will provide an overview of Anatolian/Hittite literature, as "defined" by the Hittites themselves, in the wider historical-cultural context of the Ancient Near East. In the course of discussions, we will try to answer some important questions about Hittite inscriptions, such as: why were they written down, why were they kept, for whom were they intended, and what do the answers to these questions (apart from the primary content of the texts themselves) tell us about Hittite society?

Instructor(s): H. Haroutunian     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 20005

NEHC 30006. Ancient Near Eastern Thought & Literature-3. 100 Units.

This course employs English translations of ancient Egyptian literary texts to explore the genres, conventions and techniques of ancient Egyptian literature. Discussions of texts examine how the ancient Egyptians conceptualized and constructed their equivalent of literature, as well as the fuzzy boundaries and subtle interplay between autobiography, history, myth and fiction.

Instructor(s): Brian Muhs     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): EGPT 30006, NEHC 20006, EGPT 20006

NEHC 30019. Mesopotamian Law. 100 Units.

Ancient Mesopotamia--the home of the Sumerians, Babylonians, and Assyrians who wrote in cuneiform script on durable clay tablets--was the locus of many of history's firsts. No development, however, may be as important as the formations of legal systems and legal principles revealed in contracts, trial records, and law collections (codes), among which The Laws of Hammurabi (r. 1792-1750 BC) stands as most important for understanding the subsequent legal practice and thought of Mesopotamia's cultural heirs in the Middle East and Europe until today. This course will explore the rich source materials of the Laws and relevant judicial and administration documents (all in English translations) to investigate topics of legal, social, and economic practice, including family formation and dissolution, crime and punishment (sympathetic or talionic eye for an eye, pecuniary, corporal), and procedure (contracts, trials, ordeals).

Instructor(s): M. Roth     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 20019, SIGN 26022, LLSO 20019

NEHC 30027. Sources of the Pentateuch. 100 Units.

Seminar for hands-on experience in identifying, "separating," and interpreting sources within the Pentateuch (and Joshua) through varied examples.

Instructor(s): Simeon Chavel     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Biblical Hebrew and Greek
Equivalent Course(s): BIBL 55110

NEHC 30030. Introduction to the Qur'an. 100 Units.

This course introduces the historical context, thematic and literary features, major biblical figures, and exegetical literature on the Qur'an, with a focus on the early (8th-10th century CE) and medieval periods (11th - 15th century CE). We will read select English translations from the Qur'an and its commentators, accompanied by academic secondary literature that emphasize the Qur'an's literary structure, theological underpinnings, historical, geographical, social, political and cultural contexts in early and medieval Islamic civilization, and the role of the Qur'an as both a fixed and a living and dynamic text in Muslim devotional life.

Instructor(s): Yousef Casewit     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Knowledge of Arabic is not a prerequisite, but general knowledge about Islam or an "Introduction to Islam" course is highly recommended.
Equivalent Course(s): RLST 11030, ISLM 30030

NEHC 30032. Imagining the Text: Books and Manuscripts in the Ancient ME. 100 Units.

Imagining the Text: Books and Manuscripts in the Ancient Middle East offers a unique perspective within the larger paradigm of approaches to the written word known as the "History of the Book." While many such courses look only briefly at pre-printed textual material, this course will provide an overview on the use of texts from antiquity (from the earliest writing to the Middle Ages) in the Middle East. Site visits to local repositories will provide hands-on experience with papyri, clay tablets, parchment, vellum, and rare books. Readings and discussions will explore what is meant by the term "text" in order to deeply investigate the methodologies of book history and textual criticism.

Instructor(s): Foy D Scalf     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 20032

NEHC 30035. What is a Madrasa Education? 100 Units.

Although public education has almost completely eclipsed and replaced traditional educational systems throughout the Muslim world, madrasas continue to play a significant role in Muslim societies to this day. This course explores the complex, evolving, and often conflicting pedagogical models of learning in Islamic civilization from the medieval period up to the present. Three fundamental concerns guide our examination of the various modes of organization, acquisition, embodiment, and transference of knowledge in madrasa institutions: (1) Epistemology: What is knowledge (ʿilm)? And what is an ʿālim, or "traditional Muslim knower" expected know? (2) Pedagogy: How does an ʿālim acquire, organize, transmit, and publish his/her ʿilm? (3) Religious Authority: How is ʿilm verified, authenticated, institutionalized, certificated, and mainstreamed in madrasa institutions? The sheer enormity of the subject and the variety of competing pedagogical models in the Muslim world belie a comprehensive survey. Our approach will thus be grounded in multidisciplinary research (history, ethnography, sociology, religious studies) and anchored in case studies. The readings covered in class will address questions of philosophy of education; the politics of knowledge; core texts studied in madrasas; day-to-day lived experience of students and teachers; how classical texts are taught.

Instructor(s): Yousef Casewit     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Basic knowledge of Arabic or another Islamic language is highly recommended, though not a formal prerequisite for this course.
Equivalent Course(s): ISLM 30035

NEHC 30091. Al-Ghazali. 100 Units.

This course introduces students to the figure of Abu Hamid al-Ghazali and his enormously influential contributions to philosophy, theology, Sufism, and law. In addition to reading his writings, we examine al-Ghazali's reception in secondary scholarship and the various roles attributed to him - extinguisher of reason, proponent of double truth, architect of a grand synthesis. Open to undergraduates with sufficient Arabic and instructor permission.

Instructor(s): Ahmed El Shamsy     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 20091, RLST 24591

NEHC 30212. Introduction to Egyptian Religion and Magic. 100 Units.

The course provides a general introduction to the theology and ritual practice of Ancient Egypt from the Predynastic Period to the late Roman Empire (ca. 3100 BC to AD 543). Illustrated lectures will survey primary mythology, the nature of Egyptian "magic," the evolving role of the priesthood, the function of temple and tomb architecture, mummification and funerary rites, the Amarna revolution and the origins of monotheism, as well as the impact of Egyptian religion on neighboring belief systems. Students will read a wide array of original texts in translation in addition to modern interpretive studies. Course requirements include two (2) papers and a final exam. In the first paper the student should discuss in 5-10 pages a specific deity or temple site. The second paper should contain a concise analysis (5-10 pages) of a theological issue pertinent to class discussion and readings. All topics must be cleared in advance with the instructor. Proper bibliographies and footnotes are expected, and any internet sources must be cleared with the instructor.

Instructor(s): R. Ritner     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 20212

NEHC 30287. Egypt in Late Antiquity. 100 Units.

Egypt in Late Antiquity was a melting pot of cultures, languages, and religions. With the native Egyptians subject to a series of foreign masters (Greek and Roman), each with their own languages and religious practices, Egyptian society was marked by a rich and richly documented diversity. In this course we will pay special attention to the contact of languages and of religions, discussing on the basis of primary sources in translation different aspects characteristic of this period: the crises of the Roman Empire and their effects in Egypt, the emergence of Christianity and the decline of paganism, the development of monastic communities. The course will end at the Islamic conquest.

Equivalent Course(s): HREL 30287, CLAS 35716, NEHC 20287, CLCV 20216

NEHC 30404-30406. Jewish Thought and Literature I-III.

Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Students in this sequence explore Jewish thought and literature from ancient times until the modern era through a close reading of original sources. A wide variety of works is discussed, including the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) and texts representative of rabbinic Judaism, medieval Jewish philosophy, and modern Jewish culture in its diverse manifestations. Texts in English.

NEHC 30404. Jewish Thought and Literature I: Introduction to the Hebrew Bi. 100 Units.

Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Students in this sequence explore Jewish thought and literature from ancient times until the modern era through a close reading of original sources. A wide variety of works is discussed, including the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) and texts representative of rabbinic Judaism, medieval Jewish philosophy, and modern Jewish culture in its diverse manifestations. Texts in English.

Instructor(s): J. Stackert     Terms Offered: Autumn

NEHC 30406. Jewish Thought and Literature III: Biblical Voices in Modern H. 100 Units.

The Hebrew Bible is the most important intertextual point of reference in Modern Hebrew literature, a literary tradition that begins with the (sometimes contested) claim to revive the ancient language of the Bible. In this course, we will consider the Bible as a source of vocabulary, figurative language, voice and narrative models in modern Hebrew and Jewish literature, considering the stakes and the implications of such intertextual engagement. Among the topics we will focus on: the concept of language-revival, the figure of the prophet-poet, revisions and counter-versions of key Biblical stories (including the story of creation, the binding of Isaac and the stories of King David), the Song of Songs in Modern Jewish poetry.

Instructor(s): N. Rokem     Terms Offered: Not offered in 2015-16
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 20406, RLST 20406, CMLT 30401, JWSC 20006, FNDL 20415, RLIT 30406, CMLT 20401

NEHC 30466. Coping with Changing Climates in Early Antiquity I. 100 Units.

This two-quarter seminar is offered as part of an ongoing collaborative research project called "Coping with Changing Climates in Early Antiquity: Comparative Approaches Between Empiricism and Theory," developped jointly at the University of Chicago, the University of Michigan and Purdue University. Using a shared syllabus at the three institutions, and some joint sessions in the form of webinars, the seminar will cover the theoretical framework that allows for an in-depth understanding of the relations between human societies and their environments, and on social response to change in their social, political and environmental climates (Winter quarter); it will present a series of case studies in three key geographic areas: Egypt and Nubia; the Eastern Mediterranean and Anatolia; and Mesopotamia (Spring quarter). Students will be exposed to cross-cultural approaches and will be able to interact with partners at other institutions through an online discussion group. Students will have the opportunity to work collaboratively (2-3 students) within their institution and across institutions on a research project of their choice, whose results will be presented at a poster session during the project's final conference in 2020, and will then be exhibited at the three partner institutions in the course of Academic Year 2020-2021.

Instructor(s): Herve Reculeau     Terms Offered: Winter

NEHC 30467. Coping with Changing Climates in Early Antiquity II. 100 Units.

This two-quarter seminar is offered as part of an ongoing collaborative research project called "Coping with Changing Climates in Early Antiquity: Comparative Approaches Between Empiricism and Theory," developped jointly at the University of Chicago, the University of Michigan and Purdue University. Using a shared syllabus at the three institutions, and some joint sessions in the form of webinars, the seminar will cover the theoretical framework that allows for an in-depth understanding of the relations between human societies and their environments, and on social response to change in their social, political and environmental climates (Winter quarter); it will present a series of case studies in three key geographic areas: Egypt and Nubia; the Eastern Mediterranean and Anatolia; and Mesopotamia (Spring quarter). Students will be exposed to cross-cultural approaches and will be able to interact with partners at other institutions through an online discussion group. Students will have the opportunity to work collaboratively (2-3 students) within their institution and across institutions on a research project of their choice, whose results will be presented at a poster session during the project's final conference in 2020, and will then be exhibited at the three partner institutions in the course of Academic Year 2020-2021.

Instructor(s): Herve Reculeau, Nadine Moeller, and Catherine Kearns     Terms Offered: Spring

NEHC 30501. Islamic History and Society I: The Rise of Islam and the Caliphate. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 600 to 1100, including the rise and spread of Islam, the Islamic empire under the Umayyad and Abbasid caliphs, and the emergence of regional Islamic states from Afghanistan and eastern Iran to North Africa and Spain.

Instructor(s): Orit Bashkin     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): ISLM 30500, CMES 30501, RLST 20501, NEHC 20501, HIST 25704, HIST 35704

NEHC 30502. Islamic History and Society II: The Middle Period. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 1100 to 1750, including the arrival of the Steppe Peoples (Turks and Mongols), the Mongol successor states, and the Mamluks of Egypt and Syria. We also study the foundation of the great Islamic regional empires of the Ottomans, Safavids, and Moghuls.

Instructor(s): J. Woods     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Not open to first-year students
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 35804, ISLM 30600, CMES 30502, NEHC 20502, HIST 25804

NEHC 30503. Islamic History and Society III:The Modern Middle East. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 1750 to the present, focusing on Western military, economic, and ideological encroachment; the impact of such ideas as nationalism and liberalism; efforts at reform in the Islamic states; the emergence of the "modern" Middle East after World War I; the struggle for liberation from Western colonial and imperial control; the Middle Eastern states in the cold war era; and local and regional conflicts.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Not open to first-year students
Note(s): This course does not apply to the medieval studies major or minor.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 35904, NEHC 20503, HIST 25904

NEHC 30504. Introduction to the Hebrew Bible. 100 Units.

The Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) is a complex anthology of disparate texts and reflects a diversity of religious, political, and historical perspectives from ancient Israel, Judah, and Yehud. Because this collection of texts continues to play an important role in modern religions, new meanings are often imposed upon it. In this course, we will attempt to read biblical texts apart from modern preconceptions about them. We will also contextualize their ideas and goals through comparison with texts from ancient Mesopotamia, Syro-Palestine, and Egypt. Such comparisons will demonstrate that the Hebrew Bible is fully part of the cultural milieu of the Ancient Near East. To accomplish these goals, we will read a significant portion of the Hebrew Bible in English, along with representative selections from secondary literature. We will also spend some time thinking about the nature of biblical interpretation.

Instructor(s): J. Stackert     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 20504, RLST 11004, JWSC 20120, BIBL 31000

NEHC 30507. Byzantine Empire, 1025 to 1453. 100 Units.

Internal and external problems and developments. Internal tensions on the eve of the arrival of the Seljuks. Eleventh-century economic growth. The Crusades. Achievements and deficiencies of Komnenian Byzantium. The Fourth Crusade and Byzantine successor states. Palaeologan political and cultural revival. Religious topics such as relations with the Papacy, Bogomilism, and Hesychasm. Readings will include M. Angold, "The Byzantine Empire 1025-1204", D. M. Nicol, "Last Centuries of Byzantium", and the histories of Michael Psellos and Anna Comnena. Course grade will include a final examination and a ten-page paper.

Instructor(s): W. Kaegi     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 21703, NEHC 20507, HIST 31703, ANCM 36700

NEHC 30510. Byzantine Military History. 100 Units.

Interpretation of major issues of institutional, operational, and strategic history between the fourth and fourteenth centuries. Readings include selections from Byzantine military manuals and historians, as well as recent historical assessments. Among topics are debates on the theme system and numbers. Final examination and short paper.

Instructor(s): W. Kaegi     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 32002, ANCM 34606, HIST 22002, NEHC 20510

NEHC 30568. Balkan Folklore. 100 Units.

Vampires, fire-breathing dragons, vengeful mountain nymphs. 7/8 and other uneven dance beats, heart-rending laments, and a living epic tradition. This course is an overview of Balkan folklore from historical, political, and anthropological perspectives. We seek to understand folk tradition as a dynamic process and consider the function of different folklore genres in the imagining and maintenance of community and the socialization of the individual. We also experience this living tradition firsthand through visits of a Chicago-based folk dance ensemble, "Balkan Dance."

Instructor(s): A. Ilieva     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 23301, ANTH 35908, ANTH 25908, REES 29009, CMLT 33301, REES 39009, NEHC 20568

NEHC 30570. Mughal India: Tradition & Transition. 100 Units.

The focus of this course is on the period of Mughal rule during the late sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries, especially on selected issues that have been at the center of historiographical debate in the past decades.

Instructor(s): M. Alam     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Advanced standing or consent of instructor. Prior knowledge of appropriate history and secondary literature required.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 26602, SALC 37701, NEHC 20570, SALC 27701, HIST 36602

NEHC 30573. The Burden of History: The Nation and Its Lost Paradise. 100 Units.

What makes it possible for the imagined communities called nations to command the emotional attachments that they do? This course considers some possible answers to Benedict Anderson's question on the basis of material from the Balkans. We will examine the transformation of the scenario of paradise, loss, and redemption into a template for a national identity narrative through which South East European nations retell their Ottoman past. With the help of Žižek's theory of the subject as constituted by trauma and Kant's notion of the sublime, we will contemplate the national fixation on the trauma of loss and the dynamic between victimhood and sublimity.

Instructor(s): A. Ilieva     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 23401, CMLT 33401, REES 29013, HIST 34005, NEHC 20573, REES 39013, HIST 24005

NEHC 30601-30602-30603. Islamic Thought and Literature I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required.

NEHC 30601. Islamic Thought and Literature I. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 600 to 950, concentrating on the career of the Prophet Muhammad; Qur'an and Hadith; the Caliphate; the development of Islamic legal, theological, philosophical, and mystical discourses; sectarian movements; and Arabic literature.

Instructor(s): T. Qutbuddin     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): CMES 30601, HIST 35610, NEHC 20601, SOSC 22000, RLST 20401, HIST 25610, ISLM 30601

NEHC 30602. Islamic Thought and Literature II. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 950 to 1700, surveying works of literature, theology, philosophy, sufism, politics, history, etc., written in Arabic, Persian and Turkish, as well as the art, architecture and music of the Islamicate traditions. Through primary texts, secondary sources and lectures, we will trace the cultural, social, religious, political and institutional evolution through the period of the Fatimids, the Crusades, the Mongol invasions, and the "gunpowder empires" (Ottomans, Safavids, Mughals).

Instructor(s): A. El Shamsy     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 35615, NEHC 20602, HIST 25615, RLST 20402, SOSC 22100, ISLM 30602, CMES 30602

NEHC 30603. Islamic Thought and Literature III. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 1700 to the present, exploring works of Arab intellectuals who interpreted various aspects of Islamic philosophy, political theory, and law in the modern age. We look at diverse interpretations concerning the role of religion in a modern society, at secularized and historicized approaches to religion, and at the critique of both religious establishments and nation-states as articulated by Arab intellectuals. Generally, we discuss secondary literature first and the primary sources later.

Instructor(s): A. El Shamsy     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): SOSC 22200, HIST 25616, NEHC 20603, HIST 35616, RLST 20403, ISLM 30603

NEHC 30605. Colloquium: Sources for the Study of Islamic History. 100 Units.

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the basic problems and concepts as well as the sources and methodology for the study of premodern Islamic history. Sources will be read in English translation and the tools acquired will be applied to specific research projects to be submitted as term papers.

Instructor(s): J. Woods     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 26005, HIST 36005, NEHC 20605

NEHC 30615. Drawn Together: Comics Culture in the Middle East. 100 Units.

This is a course about the rise of the graphic novel and comics culture in the Middle East. We will apply key theoretical materials from the field of comics studies to help us understand the influences, motivations and interventions of these graphic narratives in their cultural contexts. While we will primarily focus on the Arabic-speaking regions of the Middle East, the course will also include texts from Iran, Turkey, and the US and Europe.

Instructor(s): G. Hayek     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 20615

NEHC 30645. History of the Fatimid Caliphate. 100 Units.

This course will cover the history of the Fatimid (Shiite) caliphate, from its foundation in the North Africa about 909 until its end in Egypt 1171. Most of the material will be presented in classroom lectures. Sections of the course deal with Fatimid history treated chronologically and others with separate institutions and problems as they changed and developed throughout the whole time period. Readings heavily favored or highly recommended are all in English.

Instructor(s): P. Walker     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 34401, HIST 24401, NEHC 20645

NEHC 30687. Coll: Persian Historical Texts. 100 Units.

This course will focus on the study and utilization of narrative, normative and archival sources in Persian. Texts of the major Iranian historians and biographers will be subjected to close readings and analysis. The scripts, protocols, and formula used by Irano-Isalamic chancelleries will also be introduced and the form and content of published an unpublished archival documents will be transcribed and examined in their institutional context. Knowledge of Persian required.

Instructor(s): J. Woods     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Knowledge of Persian required
Equivalent Course(s): CMES 30687, HIST 59000

NEHC 30765. Introduction to the Musical Folklore of Central Asia. 100 Units.

This course explores the musical traditions of the peoples of Central Asia, both in terms of historical development and cultural significance. Topics include the music of the epic tradition, the use of music for healing, instrumental genres, and Central Asian folk and classical traditions. Basic field methods for ethnomusicology are also covered. Extensive use is made of recordings of musical performances and of live performances in the area.

Instructor(s): K. Arik     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Knowledge of Arabic and/or Islamic studies helpful but not required
Equivalent Course(s): MUSI 33503, MUSI 23503, REES 35001, NEHC 20765, ANTH 25905, REES 25001

NEHC 30815. Languages of the Ottoman Empire. 100 Units.

This course explores the languages of the Ottoman Empire.

Instructor(s): Hakan Karateke     Terms Offered: Autumn

NEHC 30832. Late Ottoman History I. 100 Units.

This course will examine important themes in late Ottoman history such as institutional reform, the development of consultative structures, taxation, capitulations, and nationalism.

Instructor(s): A. Shissler     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Reading knowledge of a Middle Eastern language, a language of the Ottoman Empire, or French. First quarter open to undergrads by permission. Second quarter open to grad students only.

NEHC 30840. Radical Islamic Pieties: 1200 to 1600. 100 Units.

Some knowledge of primary languages (i.e., Arabic, French, German, Greek, Latin, Persian, Spanish, Turkish) helpful. This course examines responses to the Mongol destruction of the Abbasid caliphate in 1258 and the background to formation of regional Muslim empires. Topics include the opening of confessional boundaries; Ibn Arabi, Ibn Taymiyya, and Ibn Khaldun; the development of alternative spiritualities, mysticism, and messianism in the fifteenth century; and transconfessionalism, antinomianism, and the articulation of sacral sovereignties in the sixteenth century. All work in English. This course is offered in alternate years.

Instructor(s): C. Fleischer     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 35901, NEHC 20840, HIST 25901, RLST 20840

NEHC 30852-30853. Seminar: Ottoman World/Suleyman I-II.

This two-quarter seminar focuses on the transformation of the Muslim Ottoman principality into an imperial entity--after the conquest of Constantinople in 1453--that laid claim to inheritance of Alexandrine, Roman/Byzantine, Mongol/Chinggisid, and Islamic models of Old World Empire at the dawn of the early modern era. Special attention is paid to the transformation of Ottoman imperialism in the reign of Sultan Süleyman the Lawgiver (1520-1566), who appeared to give the Empire its “classical” form. Topics include: the Mongol legacy; the reformulation of the relationship between political and religious institutions; mysticism and the creation of divine kingship; Muslim-Christian competition (with special reference to Spain and Italy) and the formation of early modernity; the articulation of bureaucratized hierarchy; and comparison of Muslim Ottoman, Iranian Safavid, and Christian European imperialisms. The first quarter comprises a chronological overview of major themes in Ottoman history, 1300-1600; the second quarter is divided between the examination of particular themes in comparative perspective (for example, the dissolution and recreation of religious institutions in Islamdom and Christendom) and student presentations of research for the seminar paper. In addition to seminar papers, students will be required to give an oral presentation on a designated primary or secondary source in the course of the seminar.

NEHC 30852. The Ottoman World in the Age of Suleyman the Magnificent. 100 Units.

This two-quarter seminar focuses on the transformation of the Muslim Ottoman principality into an imperial entity--after the conquest of Constantinople in 1453--that laid claim to inheritance of Alexandrine, Roman/Byzantine, Mongol/Chinggisid, and Islamic models of Old World Empire at the dawn of the early modern era. Special attention is paid to the transformation of Ottoman imperialism in the reign of Sultan Süleyman the Lawgiver (1520-1566), who appeared to give the Empire its "classical" form. Topics include: the Mongol legacy; the reformulation of the relationship between political and religious institutions; mysticism and the creation of divine kingship; Muslim-Christian competition (with special reference to Spain and Italy) and the formation of early modernity; the articulation of bureaucratized hierarchy; and comparison of Muslim Ottoman, Iranian Safavid, and Christian European imperialisms. The first quarter comprises a chronological overview of major themes in Ottoman history, 1300-1600; the second quarter is divided between the examination of particular themes in comparative perspective (for example, the dissolution and recreation of religious institutions in Islamdom and Christendom) and student presentations of research for the seminar paper. In addition to seminar papers, students will be required to give an oral presentation on a designated primary or secondary source in the course of the seminar.

Instructor(s): Cornell Fleischer     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): CMES 30852, HIST 58302

NEHC 30853. Ottoman World/Suleyman II. 100 Units.

This two-quarter seminar focuses on the transformation of the Muslim Ottoman principality into an imperial entity--after the conquest of Constantinople in 1453--that laid claim to inheritance of Alexandrine, Roman/Byzantine, Mongol/Chinggisid, and Islamic models of Old World Empire at the dawn of the early modern era. Special attention is paid to the transformation of Ottoman imperialism in the reign of Sultan Süleyman the Lawgiver (1520-1566), who appeared to give the Empire its "classical" form. Topics include: the Mongol legacy; the reformulation of the relationship between political and religious institutions; mysticism and the creation of divine kingship; Muslim-Christian competition (with special reference to Spain and Italy) and the formation of early modernity; the articulation of bureaucratized hierarchy; and comparison of Muslim Ottoman, Iranian Safavid, and Christian European imperialisms. The first quarter comprises a chronological overview of major themes in Ottoman history, 1300-1600; the second quarter is divided between the examination of particular themes in comparative perspective (for example, the dissolution and recreation of religious institutions in Islamdom and Christendom) and student presentations of research for the seminar paper. In addition to seminar papers, students will be required to give an oral presentation on a designated primary or secondary source in the course of the seminar.

Instructor(s): Cornell Fleischer     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): CMES 38052, HIST 58303

NEHC 30884. The Brighter Side of the Balkans: Humor & Satire in Lit & Film. 100 Units.

In this course, we examine the poetics of laughter in the Balkans. In order to do so, we introduce humor as both cultural and transnational. We unpack the multiple layers of cultural meaning in the logic of "Balkan humor." We also examine the functions and mechanisms of laughter, both in terms of cultural specificity and general practice and theories of humor. Thus, the study of Balkan humor will help us elucidate the "Balkan" and the "World," and will provide insight not only into cultural mores and social relations, but into the very notion of "funny." Our own laughter in class will be the best measure of our success - both cultural and intellectual.

Instructor(s): Angelina Ilieva     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Readings in English. Background in the Balkans will make the course easier, but is not required.
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 20884, CMLT 26610, REES 29007

NEHC 30885. Returning the Gaze: The Balkans and Western Europe. 100 Units.

This course investigates the complex relationship between South East European self-representations and the imagined Western "gaze" for whose benefit the nations stage their quest for identity and their aspirations for recognition. We also think about differing models of masculinity, the figure of the gypsy as a metaphor for the national self in relation to the West, and the myths Balkans tell about themselves. We conclude by considering the role that the imperative to belong to Western Europe played in the Yugoslav wars of succession. Some possible texts/films are Ivo Andric, Bosnian Chronicle; Aleko Konstantinov, Baj Ganyo; Emir Kusturica, Underground; and Milcho Manchevski, Before the Rain.

Instructor(s): A. Ilieva     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): REES 39012, NEHC 20885, REES 29012, CMLT 23201, CMLT 33201

NEHC 30901. Orality, Literature and Popular Culture of Afghanistan and Pakistan. 100 Units.

Course description unavailable.

Instructor(s): C. R. Perkins     Terms Offered: Winter 2013
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 36905, CMLT 36901, NEHC 20901, SALC 26901, CMLT 26901, HIST 26905

NEHC 30937. Nationalism & Colonialism in the Middle East. 100 Units.

The seminar covers the history of the region during the 19th and 20th centuries. It looks at how the modern historiography of modern Middle Eastern studies shaped, and was shaped by, post-colonial studies, subaltern studies, and historical perceptions of urbanity, modernity, Orientlaism, and class. The class will pay heed to the fluid and constructed nature of Arab national culture, and the terminology used by Arab nationalists concerning "nahda," "revival," and "rebirth." We will explore various "golden ages" Arab nationalists envisioned, like pre-Islamic Semitic empires, the first Islamic state under the leadership of the Prophet Muhammad, the Ummayds, the Abbasids and Muslim Spain, as a way of analyzing the the constructed and temporal nature of national discourses. We will finally examine the distinction between Pan-Arab nationalism (qawmiyya), which considered Arab culture, history, and language as markers of one's national identity, and often strove for political unity with other Arab states; and territorial-patriotic nationalism (wataniyya), which hailed the national cultures of particular Arab states (Egyptian, Iraqi, Lebanese), focusing on their geography, archaeology, and history the key features of national identity.

Instructor(s): Orit Bashkin     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 20937

NEHC 30943. Colloquium: Iran and Central Asia. 100 Units.

The first quarter will take the form of a colloquium on the sources for and the literature on the political, social, economic, technological, and cultural history of Western and Central Asia from 900 to 1750. Specific topics will vary and focus on the Turks and the Islamic world, the Mongol universal empire, the age of Timur and the Turkmens, and the development of the "Gunpowder Empires."

Instructor(s): J. Woods     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Open to upper-level ugrads with consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): CMES 58601, HIST 58601

NEHC 30944. Colloquium: Iran and Central Asia 2. 100 Units.

The second quarter will be devoted to the preparation of a major research paper.

Instructor(s): J. Woods     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): HIST 58601; open to upper-level undergraduates with consent
Equivalent Course(s): CMES 58602, HIST 58602

NEHC 31702. Byzantine Empire: 610-1025. 100 Units.

A lecture course, with limited discussion, of the principal developments with respect to government, society, and culture in the Middle Byzantine Period. Although a survey of events and changes, including external relations, many of the latest scholarly controversies will also receive scrutiny. Readings will include some primary sources in translation and examples of modern scholarly interpretations. Midterm, final examination, and a short paper.

Instructor(s): W. Kaegi     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 21702, CLCV 24307, HIST 21702, ANCM 34307, HIST 31702, CLAS 34307

NEHC 34118. Coptic Bible. 100 Units.

The Coptic versions of the Bible present one of the earliest translations of Christian scripture as the new religion spread. Understanding how the Bible (canonical and non-canonical) was read and used in Egypt at this early stage implies studying the development of Christian communities in those agitated times, as well as paying attention to questions of literacy and linguistic environment, book production, Bible (both Greek and Coptic) on papyrus, and translation and interpretation in Antiquity. The course will draw on materials assembled from my work on the critical edition of the Gospel of Mark, but will also look into other materials like the Coptic Old Testament, and non-canonical scriptures such as Nag Hammadi and the Gnostic scriptures. No previous knowledge of Coptic is required. A brief introduction to the Coptic language will be part of the class, and parallel sessions of additional language instruction will be planned for those who are interested in learning more.

Instructor(s): S. Torallas     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): BIBL 31418, CLAS 34118, CLCV 24118, RLST 21450, NEHC 24118

NEHC 35004. Readings in Ibn Tufayl's Hayy b. Yaqzan. 100 Units.

A study of Ibn Tufayl's twelfth-century philosophical/mystical romance about a boy spontaneously generated on a desert island who achieves knowledge of God through empirical study of nature. The many themes in Hayy ibn Yaqzan will be studied in relation to the philosophical literature that formed it and in light of recent modern scholarship about it.

Instructor(s): James T. Robinson     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): RLST 25105, ISLM 35004, HIJD 35004, FNDL 25105

NEHC 35147. Anthropology of Israel. 100 Units.

This seminar explores the dynamics of Israeli culture and society through a combination of weekly screenings of Israeli fiction and documentary films with readings from ethnographic and other relevant research. Among the (often overlapping) topics to be covered in this examination of the institutional and ideological construction of Israeli identity/ies: the absorption of immigrants; ethnic, class, and religious tensions; the kibbutz; military experience; the Holocaust; evolving attitudes about gender and sexuality; the struggle for minorities' rights; and Arab-Jewish relations.

Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 25147, CMES 35150, ANTH 25150, JWSC 25149, MAPS 35150, ANTH 35150

NEHC 35148. Israel in Film and Ethnography. 100 Units.

This seminar explores the dynamics of Israeli culture and society through a combination of weekly screenings of Israeli fiction and documentary films with readings from ethnographic and other relevant research. Among the (often overlapping) topics to be covered in this examination of the institutional and ideological construction of Israeli identity/ies: the absorption of immigrants; ethnic, class, and religious tensions; the kibbutz; military experience; the Holocaust; evolving attitudes about gender and sexuality; the struggle for minorities' rights; and Arab-Jewish relations. In addition to the readings, participants will be expected to view designated films before class related to the topic.

Equivalent Course(s): CMES 35148, NEHC 25148, ANTH 25148, ANTH 35148, MAPS 35148, JWSC 25148

NEHC 37302. Transmission of Islamic Knowledge in South Asia since 1800. 100 Units.

Equivalent Course(s): SALC 47302, HIST 45904, ISLM 37302

NEHC 38002. Islamic Art and Architecture of the Medieval Perso-Turkic Courts. 100 Units.

This course considers art and architecture patronized by the Seljuk, Mongol, and Timurid courts from Anatolia to Central Asia from the eleventh to the fifteenth centuries. While the princes of these courts were of Turkic and/or Mongol origin, they adopted many of the cultural and artistic expectations of Perso-Islamicate court life. Further, many objects and monuments patronized by these courts belong to artistic histories variously shared with non-Islamic powers from the Byzantine Empire to China. Questions of how modern scholars have approached and categorized the arts and architecture of these courts will receive particular attention. Each student will write a historiographic review essay with a research component.

Instructor(s): P. Berlekamp     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 38002, ARTH 28002, NEHC 28002

NEHC 39023. Returning the Gaze: The West and the Rest. 100 Units.

Aware of being observed. And judged. Inferior... Abject… Angry... Proud… This course provides insight into identity dynamics between the "West," as the center of economic power and self-proclaimed normative humanity, and the "Rest," as the poor, backward, volatile periphery. We investigate the relationship between South East European self-representations and the imagined Western gaze. Inherent in the act of looking at oneself through the eyes of another is the privileging of that other's standard. We will contemplate the responses to this existential position of identifying symbolically with a normative site outside of oneself-self-consciousness, defiance, arrogance, self-exoticization-and consider how these responses have been incorporated in the texture of the national, gender, and social identities in the region. Orhan Pamuk, Ivo Andrić, Nikos Kazantzakis, Aleko Konstantinov, Emir Kusturica, Milcho Manchevski.

Instructor(s): Angelina Ilieva     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): REES 29023, HIST 23609, CMLT 39023, REES 39023, CMLT 29023, NEHC 29023, HIST 33609

NEHC 39502. South India 1300-1700: Persons, Politics, Perceptions. 100 Units.

Equivalent Course(s): HIST 36610, HIST 26610, ISLM 39502, HREL 39502, SALC 39502, NEHC 29502, SALC 29502

NEHC 40020. The Mediterranean Sea in Antiquity: Imperial Connections. 100 Units.

The Mediterranean Sea has long inspired imaginings of lands and peoples connected by its waters. From the Romans' Mare Nostrum, "our sea," to today's variants of "middle sea" - Greek Mesogeios, German Mittelmeer, and of course, Latin Mediterranean - imaginations of the sea have often celebrated its spatial and social cohesion. The Mediterranean continues to possess a middling geopolitical identity today, situated as it is between continental Europe, the Aegean, the Middle East, and North Africa. And yet, despite our diachronic investment in recognizing the Mediterranean's grand narrative as a locus of cultural connectivity, its long-term histories of interregional dynamics remain difficult to approach holistically. This concern is especially salient when it comes to the study of ancient empires, those large, expansionary polities whose social, political, and economic practices drew disparate groups together, and at times forced them apart. This class has two closely related objectives. First, we tackle the most ambitious pieces of scholarship on Mediterranean history to evaluate how various disciplines have sought to analyze and to bound the sea as a cartographic whole. In the process, we gain an appreciation not only for the methodological and interpretive scales involved in such an undertaking, but for the various disciplinary strategies the Mediterranean's diverse histories have inspired. Second, we interrogate one sociopolitical structure - the empire - and question how the Mediterranean encouraged and challenged imperialism as a recurring formation that worked to maintain sovereignty across broad geographical expanses. In doing so, we explore the variegated processes of cultural connectivity that have characterized the ancient Mediterranean from east to west.

Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 46715, HIST 51300, ANCM 41717, CLAS 41717, CDIN 41717

NEHC 40470. Rdg: Maimonides' Guide of the Perplexed. 100 Units.

A careful study of select passages in Maimonides' Guide of the Perplexed, focusing on the method of the work and its major philosophical-theological themes, including: divine attributes, creation vs. eternity, prophecy, the problem of evil and divine providence, law and ethics, the final aim of human existence.

Instructor(s): James Robinson     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 21107, RLVC 45400, ISLM 45400, HIJD 45400, RLST 21107, HREL 45401, FNDL 24106

NEHC 40600. Islamic Love Poetry. 100 Units.

The focus of this course is classical Islamic love poetry, Arabic and Persian love lyric will be covered, as well as some Ottoman love lyric (at least in translation). In the past we have incorporated Urdu, Punjabi, Bangla, Bosnian, and Turkish traditions, and-for comparative and historical purposes-Hebrew poetry from medieval Andalus. Because none of us are proficient in the all these languages, students who are proficient a given language are asked to provide a guide (including text, translation, explanation of key vocabulary, etc.) for selected poems from in that language. Each member of the class will be asked to present one poem guide, in addition to a final assignment. Among the poets commonly included in the course are Ibn Zaydun, Ibn al-Farid, Ibn al-`Arabi, Rumi, Hafiz, Baba Fighani, Na'ili, Mir Dard, Bulleh Shah, and Ghalib.

Equivalent Course(s): RLIT 40300, CMLT 40100, ISLM 40100

NEHC 40601. Readings in the Text of the Qur'an. 100 Units.

Intensive readings in the Arabic text of the Qur'an. We focus on reading the Qur'anic text closely, with attention to grammar, syntax, recitation protocols, vocabulary, parables, symbols, figures of speech, rhetoric, changes in voice and person, allusions to parallel Qur'anic passages, and theology. Classical and modern commentaries are consulted, but the primary emphasis is on the Qur'anic text itself. The winter 2013 course will focus upon suras attributed to the Meccan period of Muhammad's prophetic career, particularly those such as suras 52, 53, 55, and 56 that take up the theme of the garden. Students may well have different levels of Arabic; the course does not make Arabic proficiency into a matter of evaluation, but encourages each participant to work at his or her level.

Instructor(s): Michael Sells     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): The second quarter of “Introduction to Qur’anic Arabic”, or 2 years of Arabic or the equivalent.
Equivalent Course(s): ISLM 40500

NEHC 40604. Readings in Arabic Religious Texts. 100 Units.

Texts to be covered include the 27th Sura of the Qur'an, selections from the Adab work Muhadarat al-Abrar of Ibn `Arabi, and examples of the Hadith Qudsi genre (hadiths that report divine, non-Qur'anic messages given to the Prophet).

Instructor(s): Michael Sells     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): ISLM 50200, HIJD 50200

NEHC 40605. From Caliphate to Nation State: A Survey of Modern Muslim Constitutional Thought. 100 Units.

Equivalent Course(s): ISLM 49200

NEHC 40630. Early Islamic Texts. 100 Units.

The course introduces students to Islamic texts of the first two centuries, covering early Islamic poetry, history, sira, hadith collections, law, theology, and political polemics. In the process, we address the overall questions of how and to what extent historical events and ideas of the early period can be reconstructed, what hitherto un- or underused sources might be at our disposal, and what approaches and methods could be appropriate for examining these sources.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): 2 years of Arabic or the equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): ISLM 49630

NEHC 40723. Art, Science, and Magic in the Pre-Modern Islamic World. 100 Units.

This seminar examines relationships between arts and the study of the cosmos in the pre-modern Islamic world. Our objects of study mediated human understanding of the cosmos, and/or offered humans the possibility of manipulating their position within it. The media in which these objects were made include manuscripts, textiles, ceramics, metalwork, and architecture. Recurrent questions of the seminar include the following. How closely can we define historically appropriate theoretical frameworks (eg., Neoplatonic, Hermetic, Aristotelean, Prophetic Medicinal) for particular objects? How do we explain objects of similar forms which might be theorized through divergent models, or objects of divergent forms which might be theorized through similar models?

Instructor(s): P. Berlekamp     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 42009

NEHC 41000. Writings of Ibn al-'Arabi. 100 Units.

This course will focus on sections from Ibn al-`Arabi's al-Futuhat al-Makkiyya "The Meccan Openings," including chapters 1 and 10, as well as the commentary he wrote upon his own love poems. The important new critical edition of the Futuhat, by Abd al-`Aziz Sultan al-Mansub (Yemen, 2013), will serve as the base text. We will also engage one of the chapters from Ibn `Arabi's Fusus al-Hikam (Bezels of Wisdom) and will be able to take advantage of the new, fully-vocalized edition of that work.

Equivalent Course(s): ISLM 51000

NEHC 41005. Colloquium: Late Antique Mediterranean I. 100 Units.

Research problems in eastern, central, and western Mediterranean from the fourth to seventh century CE. Detailed investigation of relevant primary sources in Greek, Latin, and Arabic. Will continue in winter quarter.

Equivalent Course(s): HIST 41005, CLAS 31515, ANCM 31515

NEHC 41006. Colloquium: Late Antique Mediterranean II. 100 Units.

Research problems in eastern, central, and western Mediterranean from the fourth to seventh century CE. Detailed investigation of relevant primary sources in Greek, Latin, and Arabic. In the winter quarter, we focus on research topics for the colloquium paper.

Equivalent Course(s): ANCM 31516, CLAS 31516, HIST 41006

NEHC 42800. The Book of Kings: Seminar. 100 Units.

Equivalent Course(s): BIBL 52800

NEHC 44602. Song of Songs. 100 Units.

Equivalent Course(s): BIBL 44602

NEHC 45516. Seminar: State and Society under the Ptolemies. 100 Units.

Recent research encourages a reexamination of the classical opposition between pre-modern and modern states. As traditionally defined, the key difference would be the inability of a pre-modern state to exercise in-depth control of society. Being unable to develop a significant bureaucratic apparatus, a pre-modern state could have only achieved a weak control of the people it administered. To a certain extent, the opposition still has some validity, but the alleged "weakness" of pre-modern states, for instance in terms of capacity for extraction of revenue, should be revisited. Thanks to the sources available, the Ptolemaic possessions (by which one will understand not only Egypt but all the other territories under Ptolemaic control, from Asia Minor to Syria and from Cyrene to Cyprus) provide an ideal case study to test these concepts. We will examine written documents in their original languages, but translations will also be provided, which will allow students who do not control the ancient languages to also participate in the seminar.

Equivalent Course(s): ANCM 45516, HIST 70407

NEHC 48603. Talking Birds and Cunning Jackals: A Survey of Indo-Persian Prose. 100 Units.

Prerequisites: intermediate level of Persian. This course features a selection of Persian prose texts such as tales, premodern translations of romance and epic texts on Indian themes (Mahābhārata, Rāmāyaṇa, Pañcatantra, etc…), letters, models of elegant prose writings, and anecdotes from chronicles, tadhkira literature, and autobiographical writings. We will first read easy, plain prose texts, such as Naqīb Khān's translation of the Mahābhārata commissioned by Akbar, which will allow the students to familiarize themselves with the cultural context of South Asia. Then, toward the middle of the quarter we will shift to increasingly difficult texts to reach the characteristically ornate prose of the Mughal period, such as ʿInāyat Allāh Kambūh's Bahār-i dānish or Bedil's Chahār ʿunṣur. Students with an intermediate level of Persian will thus be able to take this class and then, the following year, be ready to attend the more challenging course titled "Persian Philology and Poetry in South Asia" offered every other year, alternately with the present survey of Indo-Persian prose. Thibaut d'Hubert and Muzaffar Alam, Spring 2018

Equivalent Course(s): PERS 48693, SALC 48603

NEHC 49000. Thesis Research: Nehc. 100 Units.

Students may register for this course while conducting research for the MA thesis. Students need to obtain permission of their advisor and contact the department coordinator for assistance in registration.

Near Eastern Languages Courses

NELG 30301. Introduction to Comparative Semitics. 100 Units.

This course examines the lexical, phonological, and morphological traits shared by the members of the Semitic language family. We also explore the historical relationships among these languages and the possibility of reconstructing features of the parent speech community.

Instructor(s): R. Hasselbach-Andee     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Knowledge of two Semitic languages or one Semitic language and Historical Linguistics.
Equivalent Course(s): NELG 20301

NELG 40301. Advanced Seminar: Comparative Semitic Linguistics. 100 Units.

This course is an advanced seminar in comparative Semitics that critically discusses important secondary literature and linguistic methodologies concerning topics in the field, including topics in phonology, morphology, syntax, etc.

Instructor(s): R. Hasselbach     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Introduction to Comparative Semitics. Undergraduates require consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): NELG 20901

NELG 49900. Reading and Research. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): STAFF     Terms Offered: Autumn,Winter,Spring
Note(s): Select section from faculty list

Persian Courses

PERS 30330. Layli and Majnun of Nezami. 100 Units.

Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 30330

PERS 30370. Poetry of Nezami. 100 Units.

PERS 48693. Talking Birds and Cunning Jackals: A Survey of Indo-Persian Prose. 100 Units.

Prerequisites: intermediate level of Persian. This course features a selection of Persian prose texts such as tales, premodern translations of romance and epic texts on Indian themes (Mahābhārata, Rāmāyaṇa, Pañcatantra, etc…), letters, models of elegant prose writings, and anecdotes from chronicles, tadhkira literature, and autobiographical writings. We will first read easy, plain prose texts, such as Naqīb Khān's translation of the Mahābhārata commissioned by Akbar, which will allow the students to familiarize themselves with the cultural context of South Asia. Then, toward the middle of the quarter we will shift to increasingly difficult texts to reach the characteristically ornate prose of the Mughal period, such as ʿInāyat Allāh Kambūh's Bahār-i dānish or Bedil's Chahār ʿunṣur. Students with an intermediate level of Persian will thus be able to take this class and then, the following year, be ready to attend the more challenging course titled "Persian Philology and Poetry in South Asia" offered every other year, alternately with the present survey of Indo-Persian prose. Thibaut d'Hubert and Muzaffar Alam, Spring 2018

Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 48603, SALC 48603

Sumerian Courses

There are currently no courses offered in this subject.

Turkish Courses

TURK 30101-30102-30103. Advanced Turkish I-II-III.

The objectives of the course are to develop advanced language skills in Modern Turkish through reading, writing, listening, and speaking, with special emphasis on the proper usage of vocabulary and idiomatic expressions, and to continue the study of Turkish literature and texts begun in the second year. This course is conducted entirely in Turkish. The course is designed to bring the advanced student to a professional level of proficiency. Students are expected to produce advanced level writing in Turkish.

TURK 30101. Advanced Turkish / Ottoman Turkish. 100 Units.

Advanced Turkish / Ottoman Turkish class is designed for students with at least two years of Turkish or equivalent experience. The course is organized in two modules. The first module aims to develop advanced language skills in Modern Turkish through reading, writing, listening, and speaking, with special emphasis on the proper usage of vocabulary and idiomatic expressions. In the second module, the students will be introduced to the Ottoman Turkish language through primary sources. This module aims to provide students with Ottoman reading, transliteration and translation skills primarily for printed material, and to introduce them to Ottoman grammar. Students will be given the option to follow only one of the modules upon consultation with the instructor.

Instructor(s): Kagan Arik     Terms Offered: Autumn

TURK 30102. Advanced Turkish / Ottoman Turkish II. 100 Units.

Advanced Turkish / Ottoman Turkish class is designed for students with at least two years of Turkish or equivalent experience. The course is organized in two modules. The first module aims to develop advanced language skills in Modern Turkish through reading, writing, listening, and speaking, with special emphasis on the proper usage of vocabulary and idiomatic expressions. In the second module, the students will be introduced to the Ottoman Turkish language through primary sources. This module aims to provide students with Ottoman reading, transliteration and translation skills primarily for printed material, and to introduce them to Ottoman grammar. Students will be given the option to follow only one of the modules upon consultation with the instructor.

Instructor(s): Helga Anetshofer-Karateke     Terms Offered: Winter

TURK 30103. Advanced Turkish/Ottoman Turkish III. 100 Units.

Advanced Turkish / Ottoman Turkish class is designed for students with at least two years of Turkish or equivalent experience. The course is organized in two modules. The first module aims to develop advanced language skills in Modern Turkish through reading, writing, listening, and speaking, with special emphasis on the proper usage of vocabulary and idiomatic expressions. In the second module, the students will be introduced to the Ottoman Turkish language through primary sources. This module aims to provide students with Ottoman reading, transliteration and translation skills primarily for printed material, and to introduce them to Ottoman grammar. Students will be given the option to follow only one of the modules upon consultation with the instructor.

Terms Offered: Spring

TURK 30501-30502-30503. Ottoman Turkish I-II-III.

A selection of Turkish texts in Arabic script, both printed and handwritten, introduced in order of difficulty, and ranging from the fourteenth to the nineteenth centuries. Texts are drawn from chronicles, official documents, memoirs, poetry, and other genres.

TURK 30501. Ottoman Turkish I. 100 Units.

A selection of Turkish printed texts in Arabic script from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries is introduced in order of difficulty. Hakan Karateke's unpublished "Ottoman Reader" serves as a text book. The texts are drawn from historical textbooks, official documents, novels, and other genres.

Instructor(s): H. Aneshofer-Karateke     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): TURK 20103 or consent of instructor

TURK 30502. Ottoman Turkish II. 100 Units.

A selection of Turkish printed texts in Arabic script from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries is introduced in order of difficulty. Hakan Karateke's unpublished "Ottoman Reader" serves as a text book. The texts are drawn from historical textbooks, official documents, novels, and other genres.

Instructor(s): H. Aneshofer-Karateke     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): TURK 30501

TURK 30503. Ottoman Turkish III. 100 Units.

A selection of Turkish printed texts in Arabic script from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries is introduced in order of difficulty. Hakan Karateke's unpublished "Ottoman Reader" serves as a text book. The texts are drawn from historical textbooks, official documents, novels, and other genres.

Instructor(s): H. Aneshofer-Karateke     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): TURK 30502

TURK 40586. Advanced Ottoman Reading I. 100 Units.

This course is in Advanced Ottoman Readings.

Instructor(s): H. Karateke     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): TURK 30503 or equivalent
Note(s): Open to qualified undergraduate students

TURK 40589. Advanced Ottoman Historical Texts. 100 Units.

Based on selected readings from major Ottoman chronicles from the fifteenth to the seventeenth centuries, the course provides an introduction to the use of primary narrative materials and an overview of the development and range of Ottoman historical writing. Knowledge of modern and Ottoman Turkish required.

Instructor(s): C. Fleischer     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Consent required
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 58301

Ugaritic Courses

Uzbek Courses

UZBK 49900. Reading and Research Course: UZBK. 100 Units.

Reading and Research Course: UZBK