Print Options

Department of Linguistics

Chair

  • Lenore Grenoble

Professors

  • Diane Brentari
  • Susan Gal, Anthropology
  • Anastasia Giannakidou
  • John Goldsmith
  • Lenore Grenoble
  • Chris Kennedy
  • Jason Merchant
  • Salikoko Mufwene
  • Michael Silverstein, Anthropology
  • Alan Yu

Associate Professors

  • Karlos Arregi - Director of Graduate Studies
  • Amy Dahlstrom
  • Jason Riggle
  • Ming Xiang

Assistant Professors

  • Itamar Francez
  • Yarolsav Gorbachov
  • Greg Kobele

Emeritus Faculty

  • Howard I. Aronson, Slavic Languages & Literatures
  • Bill Darden, Slavic Languages & Literatures
  • Gene B. Gragg, Oriental Institute
  • Paul Friedrich, Anthropology
  • Victor Friedman
  • Eric P. Hamp, Linguistics
  • Carolyn G. Killean, Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations
  • Colin P. Masica, South Asian Languages & Civilizations
  • G. David McNeill, Psychology
  • Jerrold Sadock, Linguistics

Since 1926, the Department of Linguistics at the University of Chicago has been at the center of the development of the field, counting among its faculty linguists of the first rank such as Sapir and Bloomfield. It is theory-oriented with a deep empirical interest in languages. One of its outstanding characteristics is its commitment to a wide range of approaches to the study of language. Interdisciplinary, interdepartmental study is encouraged, and students regularly work with faculty in several other departments. Students are expected to become active researchers as soon as possible after their arrival here. Many students come with strong undergraduate training in linguistics, or with a Master’s degree; others come with strong training in fields such as philosophy, mathematics, or a particular language or language group. The faculty are involved in synchronic and diachronic research on languages from around the world. These varied interests are reflected in the topics of the dissertations that have been written in the Department.

Program

The graduate program in linguistics leading to the PhD degree is intended to be completed in five years. The University of Chicago operates on the quarter system. Graduate students normally register for three courses per quarter, three quarters per year. They generally take three to four years of coursework.

In the first two years, students take eight foundational courses chosen from a selection of thirteen available options. Six of these eight classes must be completed during the student’s first year in the program.

In addition to these foundational courses, students must also take a methods course and three additional graduate-level courses in linguistics.

In years two and three, when students are writing qualifying papers, they must also take the Research Seminar.

A large proportion of courses offered in the Linguistics Department are advanced courses that are open to all students. The topics of these courses change from year to year, in reflection of the ongoing research interests of both faculty and graduate students, and cover areas of current interest in the field at large. Students are also free to take courses related to their research interests that are offered by other departments in the University.

In the second and third years, students continue taking courses and write two qualifying papers under faculty supervision. In addition to these major landmarks, students are required to satisfy a non-Indo European language requirement and to pass a reading examination in an additional language other than English. Upon completion of the qualifying papers and course and language requirements and defense of a dissertation proposal by the end of the fourth year students are admitted to candidacy for the PhD; the only remaining requirement is the dissertation.

Application and Admission

Completed applications for admission and aid, along with all supporting materials, are due in mid-December for the academic year that starts in the following Autumn.

Four parts of the application are critically important and should accompany the application: the student’s academic record, letters of recommendation submitted by persons able to describe the student’s achievements and promise, the student’s statement of purpose, which describes the intellectual issues and subjects which they hope to explore at Chicago, and a sample of pertinent written work that demonstrates the applicant’s research interests or capabilities. The sample may consist of published essays, class term papers, or a B.A. or M.A. thesis, or some combination of all of these. The student’s academic record is documented through official transcripts, but applicants are also encouraged to submit as supplemental material an ‘annotated transcript’: a file they create that lists all the courses they have taken which are relevant to graduate study in linguistics, with the grade received, the full name of the instructor, major texts used or studied, and a brief (no more than five sentences) description of the material covered in the course. Such a supplemental file is more informative for judging the preparation of an applicant than is the official transcript.

When completing the application form, it is of benefit to the applicant to be as specific as possible in describing his or her research interests. General comments are of relatively little use; applicants are encouraged to discuss specific linguistic subject matters that they are interested in or have worked on.

If an applicant knows faculty members with whom he or she might work, the latter’s names should be given as well. The faculty of the Linguistics Department would be happy to answer any questions that prospective students may have. Please contact them individually regarding their research or classes, or contact the Director of Graduate Studies for more general or administrative questions.  Contact information is available at the Linguistics Department website.

The application process for admission and financial aid for all graduate programs in Humanities is administered through the divisional Office of the Dean of Students. The Application for Admission and Financial Aid, with instructions, deadlines and department specific information is available online at:  http://humanities.uchicago.edu/students/admissions

International students must provide evidence of English proficiency by submitting scores from either the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). (Current minimum scores, etc., are provided with the application.) For more information, please see the Office of International Affairs website at https://internationalaffairs.uchicago.edu, or call them at (773) 702-7752.

Questions pertaining to admissions and aid should be directed to humanitiesadmissions@uchicago.edu or (773) 702-1552.

Linguistics - Basque Courses

Linguistics - Linguistics Courses

LING 30100. Introduction to Linguistics I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): These courses must be taken in sequence
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 27001,ANTH 37001,LING 20100,SOSC 21700

LING 30101. Phonological Analysis I. 100 Units.

This course introduces cross-linguistic phonological phenomena and methods of analysis through an indepth examination of fundamental notions that transcend differences between theoretical approaches: contrast, neutralization, natural classes, distinctive features, and basic non-linear phonological processes (e.g., assimilation, harmony, dissimilation).

Instructor(s): Diane Brentari     Terms Offered: Autumn

LING 30102. Phonological Analysis II. 100 Units.

This course is intended for students with a strong background in phonology. We will explore the major themes of phonological theory from 1870 to today, focusing on such questions as the distinction between phonology and morphophonology, the nature of phonological representations, and the character of hard and soft contraints on phonological representations.

Instructor(s): Alan Yu     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): LING 30101

LING 30150. Language and Communication. 100 Units.

This course can also be taken by students who are not majoring in Linguistics but are interested in learning something about the uniqueness of human language, spoken or signed. It covers a selection from the following topics: What is the position of spoken language in the usually multimodal forms of communication among humans? In what ways does spoken language differ from signed language? What features make spoken and signed language linguistic? What features distinguish linguistic means of communication from animal communication? How do humans communicate with animals? From an evolutionary point of view, how can we account for the fact that spoken language is the dominant mode of communication in all human communities around the world? Why cannot animals really communicate linguistically? What do the terms language "acquisition" and "transmission" really mean? What factors account for differences between "language acquisition" by children and by adults? Are children really perfect language learners? What factors bring about language evolution, including language speciation and the emergence of new language varieties? How did language evolve in mankind? This is a general education course without any prerequisites. It provides a necessary foundation to those working on language at the graduate and undergraduate levels.

Instructor(s): Salikoko Mufwene     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): CHDV Distribution: B*,C*; 5*
Equivalent Course(s): CHDV 20150,CHDV 30150,LING 20150

LING 30200. Introduction to Linguistics II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): These courses must be taken in sequence
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 27002,ANTH 37002,LING 20200,SOSC 21800

LING 30201. Syntactic Analysis I. 100 Units.

This course is an introduction to basic goals and methods of current syntactic theory through a detailed analysis of a range of phenomena, with emphasis on argumentation and empirical justification. Major topics include phrase structure and constituency, selection and subcategorization, argument structure, case, voice, expletives, and raising and control structures.

Instructor(s): Karlos Arregi     Terms Offered: Autumn

LING 30202. Syntactic Analysis II. 100 Units.

This course is a continuation of Syntactic Analysis-1. The emphasis will be on A'-movement and ellipsis operations within the framework of Principles and Parameters and the Minimalist Program. Although we will examine different types of movement and ellipsis constructions, as well as their interactions, the objective will be to understand to what extent we can develop a general theory of syntax. The course will have a strong cross-linguistic aspect to it, examining data from Irish, Austronesian languages, Mayan languages, Wolof, Russian, Romance, Germanic, and others. The topics will include wh-movement in questions, relative clauses, and other constructions, islands and other constraints on movement, sentence fragments (sluicing, split questions), VP-ellipsis, and gapping.

Instructor(s): Greg Kobele     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): LING 30201

LING 30300. Introduction to Linguistics III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): These courses must be taken in sequence
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 27003,ANTH 37003,LING 20300,SOSC 21900

LING 30301. Semantics and Pragmatics I. 100 Units.

This is the first in a two-course sequence designed to provide a foundation in the scientific study of all aspects of linguistic meaning. The first quarter focuses primarily on pragmatics:  those aspects of meaning that arise from the way that speakers put language to use, rather than through the formal properties of the linguistic system itself, which is the domain of semantics. However, a central goal of the course will be to begin to develop an understanding of the relation between pragmatics and semantics, by exploring empirical phenomena in which contextual and conventional aspects of meaning interact in complex but regular and well-defined ways, and by learning analytical techniques that allow us to tease these two aspects of linguistics meaning apart.

Instructor(s): Chris Kennedy     Terms Offered: Autumn

LING 30302. Semantics and Pragmatics II. 100 Units.

This is the second in a two-course sequence designed to provide a foundation in the scientific study of all aspects of linguistic meaning. The second quarter focuses on the  syntax-semantics interface and cross-linguistic semantics. The class will introduce in detail a theory of the way in which the meaning of complex linguistic expressions is formed compositionally from the meaning of constituent parts, and the interaction of semantic and syntactic composition. This theory will form the basis for exploring some empirical questions about the systematicity of cross-linguistic variation in the encoding of meaning.

Instructor(s): Itamar Francez     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): LING 30301

LING 30401. Psycholinguistics: Language Processing. 100 Units.

This is an advanced introduction to the field of psycholinguistics. We will do an in-depth overview of both the empirical findings and the methodologies used on various topics in language comprehension/production, including areas of speech perception, lexical processing, syntactic parsing, and semantic/pragmatic processing.  Models at both the computational and the mechanistic levels will also be examined. 

Instructor(s): Ming Xiang     Terms Offered: Autumn

LING 31000. Morphology. 100 Units.

Looking at data from a wide range of languages, we will study the structure of words. We will consider the nature of the elements out of which words are built and the principles that govern their combination. The effects of word structure on syntax, semantics, and phonology will be examined. We will think critically about the concepts of morpheme, inflection, derivation, and indeed, the concept of word itself.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): LING 20001
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 37500

LING 31100. Language in Culture I. 100 Units.

Among topics discussed in the first half of the sequence are the formal structure of semiotic systems, the ethnographically crucial incorporation of linguistic forms into cultural systems, and the methods for empirical investigation of “functional” semiotic structure and history.

Instructor(s): C. Nakassis     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor
Note(s): CHDV Distribution: 5*
Equivalent Course(s): CHDV 37201,PSYC 47001,ANTH 37201

LING 31200. Language in Culture II. 100 Units.

The second half of the sequence takes up basic concepts in sociolinguistics and their critique.

Instructor(s): Kristina Wirtz     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor
Note(s): CHDV Distribution: 5*
Equivalent Course(s): PSYC 47002,CHDV 37202,ANTH 37202

LING 31300. Historical Linguistics. 100 Units.

This course deals with the issue of variation and change in language. Topics include types, rates, and explanations of change; the differentiation of dialects and languages over time; determination and classification of historical relationships among languages, and reconstruction of ancestral stages.

Instructor(s): Yaroslav Gorbachov     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): LING 20600/30600 & LING 20800/30800 or consent of instructor

LING 31310. Introduction to Indo-European Linguistics. 100 Units.

An introduction to the comparative study of the Indo-European languages.  We will survey the major branches of the Indo-European family and discuss various aspects of PIE grammar as it is currently reconstructed.

Instructor(s): Y. Gorbachev     Terms Offered: Spring 2015

LING 32750. Laboratory Phonology. 100 Units.

This course is intended to provide a foundation for students to pursue the quantitative study of phonology in the context of human interaction, and of speech and perception in the context of language. Specifically, this course focuses on how to design, conduct, and analyze a phonological experiment. We will approach laboratory phonology from the perspectives of both the speaker and the listener, with each perspective constituting roughly half the course. In the process, we will gain and practice skills in experimental phonetic and psycholinguistic work, while testing aspects of current phonological theory. 

Instructor(s): Alan Yu     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): LING 22750

LING 33360. Methods in Gesture and Sign Language Research. 100 Units.

In this course we will explore methods of research used in the disciplines of linguistics and psychology to investigate sign language and gesture. We will choose a set of canonical topics from the gesture and sign literature, such as pointing, use of the body in quotation, and the use of non-manuals, in order to understand the value of various effective methods in current use and the types of research questions they are best equipped to handle. 

Instructor(s): D. Brentari, S. Goldin-Meadow     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): CHDV Distribution: M; M*
Equivalent Course(s): CHDV 23360,CHDV 33360,PSYC 33360,LING 23360,PSYC 23360

LING 33920. The Language of Deception and Humor. 100 Units.

In this course we will examine the language of deception and humor from a variety of perspectives: historical, developmental, neurological, and cross-cultural and in a variety of contexts: fiction, advertising, politics, courtship, and everyday conversation. We will focus on the (linguistic) knowledge and skills that underlie the use of humor and deception, and on what sorts of things they are used to communicate.

Instructor(s): Jason Riggle     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): LING 23920,SIGN 26030

LING 34960. Creole Genesis and Genetic Linguistics. 100 Units.

In this seminar course we will review the “creole exceptionalism” tradition against the uniformitarian view, according to which creoles have emerged and evolved like other, natural and non-creole languages. We will situate creoles in the context of the plantation settlement colonies that produced them and compare their emergence specifically with that of languages such as English and the Romance languages in Europe. We will also compare these evolutions with those of new colonial varieties of European languages (such as Amish English, mainstream American English varieties, Brazilian Portuguese, and Québécois French) which emerged around the same time but are not considered creoles. Using the comparative approach (in evolutionary theory), we will assess whether the criteria used in the genetic classification of languages have been applied uniformly to creole and non-creole languages. In return, we will explore ways in which genetic creolistics can inform and improve genetic linguistics (including historical dialectology).

Instructor(s): Salikoko Mufwene     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): LING 21300/31300 (Historical Linguistics), LING 26310/36310 (Contact Linguistics), or consent of the instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): LING 24960

LING 37150. Chicago Linguistic Landscape. 100 Units.

The field of linguistic landscapes examines the public display of languages, dialects, and writing systems: Who is the author and audience of such messages? Which languages are chosen for official signage? What can we learn about present or past multilingualism? What is conveyed by nonstandard dialect forms or stylized writing? In this course, students will collaborate on creating an online map of Chicago with geo-tagged images. At least three weekend days will be spent on field trips to Chicago neighborhoods.

Instructor(s): Amy Dahlstrom     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): LING 27150

LING 37605. Language, Culture, and Thought. 100 Units.

Survey of research on the interrelation of language, culture, and thought from the evolutionary, developmental, historical, and culture-comparative perspectives with special emphasis on the mediating methodological implications for the social sciences.

Instructor(s): J. Lucy     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Grad status, Undergrads in 3rd or 4th year, or permission of instructor.
Note(s): CHDV Distribution: B, C; 2*, 3*, 5*
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 27605,ANTH 37605,CHDV 31901,PSYC 21950,PSYC 31900,LING 27605,CHDV 21901

LING 38355. Linguistic Introduction to Swahili-1. 100 Units.

Spoken in ten countries of Eastern and Central Africa, Swahili has more speakers than any other language in the Bantu family, a group of more than 400 languages most prevalent in sub-equatorial Africa. Based on Swahili Grammar and Workbook, this course helps the students master key areas of the Swahili language in a fast yet enjoyable pace. Topics include sound and intonation patterns, noun class agreements, verb moods, and sentence structures. Additionally, this course provides important listening and expressive reading skills. For advanced students, historical interpretations are offered for exceptional patterns observed in Swahili, in relation with other Bantu languages. This is a general introduction course with no specific prerequisites. 

Instructor(s): Fidele Mpiranya     Terms Offered: Winter

LING 38356. Linguistic Introduction to Swahili-2. 100 Units.

Based on Swahili Grammar and Workbook, this course is a continuation of Linguistic Introduction to Swahili-1. It addresses complex issues related to grammatical agreement, verb moods, noun and verb derivation, non-typical adjectives and adverbs, double object constructions, subordinate/coordinated clause constructions, and dialectal variation. Additionally, this course provides important listening and expressive reading skills. For advanced students, historical interpretations are offered for exceptional patterns observed in Swahili, in relation with other Bantu languages.

Instructor(s): Fidèle Mpiranya     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): LING 38355

LING 38380. Introduction to Kinyarwanda I. 100 Units.

Spoken by around 18 million in Central and Eastern Africa, Kinyarwanda / Kirundi is one of the most spoken Bantu languages and has the status of an official language in Rwanda and Burundi. Based on a conversation book and a grammar guide, this course integrates speaking practice and linguistic discussion. It will allow the students to understand fundamental structures of Kinyarwanda in various areas. Topics include sound and tonal patterns, noun class agreements, verb moods, and sentence structures. Additionally, this course provides important listening and expressive reading skills. It will allow the students to discover elements of the Rwandan culture and to participate in elementary conversation about everyday life in Kinyarwanda. This is a general introduction course with no specific prerequisites. It allows fulfilling the non-Indo-European language requirement.

Instructor(s): F. Mpiranya     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): LING 28380

LING 38381. Introduction to Kinyarwanda II. 100 Units.

This course is a continuation of Introduction to Kinyarwanda I. It integrates speaking practice and linguistic discussion. The students will be able to understand fundamental structures of Kinyarwanda in various areas. Topics include sound and tonal patterns, noun class agreements, verb moods, and sentence structures. Additionally, this course provides important listening and expressive reading skills. It allows the students to discover elements of the Rwandan culture and to participate in elementary conversation about everyday life in Kinyarwanda. This course allows fulfilling the non-Indo-European language requirement.

Instructor(s): Fidele Mpiranya     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): LING 28380/38380
Equivalent Course(s): LING 28381

LING 39286. Biological and Cultural Evolution. 100 Units.

This course draws on readings in and case studies of language evolution, biological evolution, cognitive development and scaffolding, processes of socialization and formation of groups and institutions, and the history and philosophy of science and technology. We seek primarily to elaborate theory to understand and model processes of cultural evolution, while exploring analogies, differences, and relations to biological evolution. This has been a highly contentious area, and we examine why. We seek to evaluate what such a theory could reasonably cover and what it cannot.

Instructor(s): S. Mufwene, W. Wimsatt     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Third- or fourth-year standing or consent of instructor required; core background in evolution and genetics strongly recommended.
Note(s): This course does not meet requirements for the biological sciences major. CHDV Distribution: A
Equivalent Course(s): CHDV 23930,ANTH 28615,ANTH 38615,LING 11100,CHSS 37900,CHDV 33930,BIOS 29286,HIPS 23900,PHIL 22500,PHIL 32500,NCDV 27400,BPRO 23900

LING 40301. Field Methods I. 100 Units.

The field methods course is a two-quarter course, taken by graduate students and advanced undergraduates. (Students may elect to take the course more than once.) This course is devoted to the elicitation, transcription, organization, and analysis of linguistic data from a native speaker of a language not commonly studied. Students will also gain practical experience in the use of fieldwork equipment. Language chosen may vary from year to year.

Instructor(s): Amy Dahlstrom, Lenore Grenoble     Terms Offered: Autumn

LING 40302. Field Methods II. 100 Units.

The field methods course is a two-quarter course, taken by graduate students and advanced undergraduates. (Students may elect to take the course more than once.) This course is devoted to the elicitation, transcription, organization, and analysis of linguistic data from a native speaker of a language not commonly studied. Students will also gain practical experience in the use of fieldwork equipment. Language chosen may vary from year to year.

Instructor(s): Amy Dahlstrom     Terms Offered: Winter

LING 40310. Experimental Methods. 100 Units.

This course will cover the basic methods for experimental studies, including experimental design, data collection and statistical analysis. To demonstrate different design and analysis tools, we will look at data set from different types of studies, including self-paced reading, acceptability judgment, eye tracking, ERP, etc. Students will also gain hands-on experience on different paradigms.

Instructor(s): Laura Cassanto     Terms Offered: Winter

LING 40320. Language Documentation: Theory and Practice. 100 Units.

This course covers the theory and methods in language documentation and description, with an emphasis on the role of language endangerment in the field, with discussion and hands-on work involving data collection, annotation, archiving, and presentation of results (including scholarly publications and the production of community-focused materials).  Students will work with a native speaker of a lesser-studied language to conduct an actual digital documentation project.

,

(This course complements but does not supplement LING 40301/40302 Field Methods.)

Instructor(s): Lenore Grenoble     Terms Offered: Winter

LING 41920. The Evolution of Language. 100 Units.

How did language emerge in the phylogeny of mankind? Was its evolution saltatory or gradual? Did it start late or early and then proceed in a protracted way? Was the emergence monogenetic or polygenetic? What were the ecological prerequisites for the evolution, with the direct ecology situated in the hominine species itself, and when did the prerequisites obtain? Did there ever emerge a language organ or is this a post-facto construct that can be interpreted as a consequence of the emergence of language itself? What function did language evolve to serve, to enhance thought processes or to facilitate rich communication? Are there modern “fossils” in the animal kingdom that can inform our scholarship on the subject matter? What does paleontology suggest? We will review some of the recent and older literature on these questions and more.

Instructor(s): S. Mufwene     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): CHSS 41920,ANTH 47305,CHDV 41920,EVOL 41920,PSYC 41920,LING 21920,CHDV 21920

LING 42100. Seminar: Semantics. 100 Units.

Please visit the Linguistics website for course topic and description.

Instructor(s): Itamar Francez, Autumn ,Chris Kennedy, Winter     Terms Offered: Autumn,Winter
Note(s): This course has a different topic each quarter it is offered.

LING 42200. Seminar on Syntax-Semantics: The Syntax/Semantics Interface. 100 Units.

This seminar explores a range of topics in the syntax/semantics interface, including (a) clause structure and argument structure (including ditransitives, active/passive/middle voice, deponents, and the morphology of the verb); (b) negation, negative polarity, and negative concord; (c) temporal and aspectual morphemes and mood particles; (d) the internal structure of quantifier and noun phrases (QPs, DPs, and NPs): genitives, adjectival modification, definite reduplications, nominalizations, and partitive structures; (e) wh-structures: questions, relative clauses (including free relatives), and comparatives; (f) elliptical structures, and code-switching. The language focus will vary, though we will have as a goal the development of a considerable understanding of these issues in modern Greek in particular, but with attention to Germanic, Romance, Slavic, Albanian, Hungarian, and other languages as participant interest and expertise indicate.

Instructor(s): Anastasia Giannakidou and Jason Merchant     Terms Offered: Autumn

LING 47800. Linguistics Pedagogy: Proseminar. 100 Units.

This course deals with a variety of topics specific to Linguistic Pedagogy.

Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring,Winter

LING 47900. Research Seminar. 100 Units.

The course aims to guide students on their research in a structured way and to present professionalization information crucial to success in the field. The course is organized largely around working on the research paper, with the goal of making it a conference-presentable and journal-publishable work. Topics covered include abstracts, publishing, handouts, presentation skills, course design, creating and maintaining a CV, cover letters, webpages, and in general everything that is required for you to successfully compete for jobs in linguistics.

Instructor(s): Karlos Arregi     Terms Offered: Autumn,Winter

LING 52400. Seminar: Phonology. 100 Units.

Please visit the Linguistics website for course topic and description

Instructor(s): Jason Riggle     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): LING 30102 or instructor's consent
Note(s): This course has a different topic each quarter it is offered.

LING 58600. Seminar: Computational Linguistics. 100 Units.

(Topic: Learnability) Two of the motivating problems of linguistics are how people use language, and how we learn to use language.  The standard approach to these problems is to postulate an abstract knowledge of language (competence) which gets used or learned (performance).   But how could a performance system actually work -- how could the descriptions linguists write be brought to bear on the above motivating problems, or vice versa?  This course will focus on the problem of language learning, in particular from the perspective of inductive inference (PAC and Gold paradigms, and variants).  These paradigms concentrate on the question of how a learner generalizes from the data, and investigate the conditions under which generalizing in this way will be successful.  Accordingly, these paradigms allow for a deep connection to be made between linguistic typology and learning theory.  We will look at examples inspired by phonology, syntax, and semantics, depending on the interests of the participants.  A previous course in formal methods (such as Mathematical Lingusitics) would provide a helpful background.

Instructor(s): Greg Kobele     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This course has a different topic each quarter it is offered.

LING 60000. Reading and Research: LING. 100 Units.

This course is an independent study under the guidance of a faculty advisor, indicated by the section number. Please consult with the faculty member in question before enrolling.

Instructor(s): Varies     Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring,Winter
Prerequisite(s): Departmental approval

LING 99999. Advanced Slavic Linguistics. 100 Units.

The course covers advanced topics in the history of aeronautics.

Instructor(s): John Mark Hansen     Terms Offered: Autumn. Not offered 2012-2013; Will be offered 2014-2015
Prerequisite(s): ANTH 33300
Note(s): Will taught in Greek
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 99999,SLAV 99999

Linguistics - Modern Greek Courses

MOGK 30100-30200-30300. Elementary Modern Greek I-II-III.

This course is designed to help students acquire communicative competence in Modern Greek and a basic understanding of its structures. Through a variety of exercises, students develop all skill sets.

MOGK 30100. Elementary Modern Greek I. 100 Units.

This course aims to develop elementary proficiency in spoken and written Modern Greek and to introduce elements of cultural knowledge. The course will familiarize the students with the Greek alphabet, Modern Greek pronunciation rules and the basic morphology and syntax, with an emphasis on reading and conversational skills. The students will be able to communicate minimally with formulaic and rote utterances and produce words, phrases and lists.

Instructor(s): Chrysanthi Koutsiviti     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): NELG 10100,MOGK 10100

MOGK 30200. Elementary Modern Greek II. 100 Units.

This course aims to develop elementary proficiency in spoken and written Modern Greek and to introduce elements of cultural knowledge. The course will familiarize the students with the basic morphology and syntax, with an emphasis on reading and conversational skills. The students will be able to handle a variety of tasks and manage an uncomplicated situation using mostly formulaic and rote utterances. They will also be able to express personal meaning forming paragraphs.

Instructor(s): Chrysanthi Koutsiviti     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): MOGK 10100/30100 or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): NELG 10200,MOGK 10200

MOGK 30300. Elementary Modern Greek III. 100 Units.

This course aims to develop elementary proficiency in spoken and written Modern Greek and to introduce elements of cultural knowledge.

Instructor(s): Chrysanthi Koutsiviti     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): MOGK 10200/30200 or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): NELG 10300,MOGK 10300