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Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations

Department Website: http://ealc.uchicago.edu

Chair

  • Jacob Eyferth

Director of Graduate Studies

  • Michael Bourdaghs

Director of Undergraduate Studies

  • Judith Zeitlin

Professors

  • Michael K. Bourdaghs
  • Donald Harper
  • James Ketelaar (also with History)
  • Haun Saussy (also with Comparative Literature)
  • Edward L. Shaughnessy
  • Hung Wu (also with Art History)
  • Judith Zeitlin

Associate Professors

  • Guy S. Alitto (also with History)
  • Susan Burns (also with History)
  • Paul Copp
  • Kyeong Hee Choi
  • Jacob Eyferth (also with History)
  • Paola Iovene
  • Yung-ti Li
  • Hoyt Long

Assistant Professors

  • Ariel Fox

Senior Lecturers

  • Fangpei Cai
  • Harumi Lory
  • Hiroyoshi Noto
  • Youqin Wang
  • Jun Yang

Lecturers

  • Satoko Ogura Bourdaghs
  • Yoko Katagiri
  • Ji Eun Kim
  • Yi-Lu Kuo
  • Meng Li
  • Misa Miyachi
  • Wonkyung Na
  • Laura Skosey
  • Xaiorong Wang
  • Shan Xiang

Emeritus Faculty

  • George Chih Chao 
  • Norma Field
  • Tetsuo Najita, History

Program Description

The Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations is a multidisciplinary department, with faculty specialists in history, art, philosophy, languages, linguistics, literature, and religions, that offers a program of advanced study of the traditional and modern cultures of China, Japan, and Korea. At the same time, students are encouraged to pursue their interests across traditional disciplinary lines by taking courses in other departments in the Divisions of the Social Sciences and the Humanities.

The Department admits applicants only for the Ph.D. degree, and does not offer a terminal M.A. program. Students who arrive with a master's degree will be expected to fulfill the 18-course requirement. Students interested in a terminal M.A. degree should contact the University of Chicago Master of Arts Program in the Humanities or the Master of Arts Program in Social Sciences.

Students admitted to doctoral study are typically awarded a five-year fellowship package that includes full tuition, academic year stipends, summer stipends, and medical insurance. Teaching training is a vital part of the educational experience at the University, so all fellowships include a required teaching component. 

During the first two years, students take nine courses each year. Depending on students' interests and preparation, some of the coursework may take place outside the Department. It may also include work in language, either the primary language of study or a secondary one, whether East Asian or not, as well as in a second East Asian civilization. Many students may also wish to spend one or more years in Japan, China, Taiwan, or Korea to achieve language mastery or do research for their dissertation. Teaching opportunities for students are also available.

After the Ph.D. qualifying exam, which consists of both an oral and written component, acceptance of a dissertation proposal admits a student to candidacy. Students are expected to write and defend dissertations that make original contributions to knowledge. The degree is conferred upon the successful defense of the completed dissertation.

Contact

Dawn Brennan, Department Coordinator

Wieboldt Hall, Room 301

1050 East 58th Street

Chicago, IL 60637

Phone: 773.702.1255

ealc@uchicago.edu

Website: ealc.uchicago.edu 

Information on How to Apply

The application process for admission and financial aid for all graduate programs in Humanities is administered through the divisional Office of the Dean of Students. The application for Admission and Financial Aid, with instructions, deadlines, and department specific information is available online at: http://humanities.uchicago.edu/students/admissions.

Questions pertaining to admissions and aid should be directed to humanitiesadmissions@uchicago.edu or (773) 702-1552.

International students must provide evidence of English proficiency by submitting scores from either the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). Current minimum scores, etc., are provided with the application. For more information, please see the Office of International Affairs website at https://internationalaffairs.uchicago.edu, or call them at (773) 702-7752.

For additional information about the East Asian Languages and Civilizations program, please see http://ealc.uchicago.edu or call (773) 702-1255.

Program Requirements

The requirements are filled in three stages: Masters Degree Requirements (for students entering with or without an M.A. in East Asian Studies), Ph.D. Candidacy Requirements, and Ph.D. Degree Requirements.

Master's Degree Requirements

  1. Complete eighteen courses
    1. One course should be EALC 65000 Directed Translation, although the translation requirement can be met in other ways.
    2. No more than two courses taken for an "R" or "P" grade
    3. Two non-specialization East Asian courses
  2. No outstanding Incompletes
  3. Courses or Placement at the third year level of one East Asian Language.
  4. One M.A. thesis or two M.A. papers

Ph.D. Candidacy Requirements

  1. Second East Asian Language
  2. Mastery of Languages required for primary research
  3. Proficiency in any additional languages required for research
  4. Pass PhD Qualifying Exams
  5. Defense and approval of Dissertation Proposal

Once the student has passed the dissertation proposal defense, the Department will certify that the student has met all the requirements for Admission to Candidacy (all requirements for degree with the exception of the dissertation). The Department will submit paperwork to the Office of the Dean of Students that recommends that the student be admitted to candidacy for the PhD degree.

Ph.D. Degree Requirements

  1. Admission to Ph.D. Candidacy
  2. Approval and Defense  of the Dissertation

Joint Ph.D. Program in East Asian Cinema

The Program in Cinema and Media Studies and the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations have formed a joint Ph.D. program in East Asian cinema at the University of Chicago. The University has long-standing engagement with both Film and East Asian studies and has already graduated a number of scholars who are changing the field of East Asian cinema around the world. The purpose of this degree program is to provide the best possible training in the methods, languages, and cultural contexts needed to undertake original research on specific topics in East Asian cinema and media studies.  Students interested in following this course of study will first apply directly to either the Program in Cinema and Media Studies or to the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations.

You can see up-to-date course listings at our website, ealc.uchicago.edu, or on the registrar's Times Schedules at http://timeschedules.uchicago.edu/.

EALC COURSES

EALC 10600. Topics in EALC: Ghosts & the Fantastic in Literature and Film. 100 Units.

What is a ghost? How and why are ghosts represented in particular forms in a particular culture at particular historical moments and how do these change as stories travel between cultures? This course will explore the complex meanings, both literal and figurative, of ghosts and the fantastic in traditional Chinese, Japanese, and Korean tales, plays, and films . Issues to be explored include: 1) the relationship between the supernatural, gender, and sexuality; 2) the confrontation of death and mortality; 3) collective anxieties over the loss of the historical past 4) and the visualization (and exorcism) of ghosts through performance.

Instructor(s): J. Zeitlin     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This course can replace what used to be the Concentrators Seminar to fulfill a requirement as an EALC major.
Equivalent Course(s): SIGN 26006, CMST 24603

EALC 26800. Korean Literature, Foreign Criticism. 100 Units.

Ever since the introduction of the modern/Western concept of "literature" to early twentieth-century Korea, literary production, consumption, and reproduction have gone hand in hand with the reception of the trends of "criticism" and "theory" propagated elsewhere, in the West in particular. This course examines the relationship between the ideas of "indigenous" and "foreign" as embodied by Korean writers in the fields of creative writing, journalism, and academia with a view to engaging and interrogating the idea of "national literature" and its institutional manifestations. It further examines artistic and theoretical endeavors by Korean writers and intellectuals to critically reflect upon and move beyond the unquestioned linguistic, ideological, and ethno-national boundaries.

Instructor(s): K. Choi     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 36800

EALC 29500-29600-29700. Senior Thesis Tutorial I-II-III.

One quarter of this sequence may be counted for credit in the major.

EALC 29500. Senior Thesis Tutorial I. 100 Units.

For this course students are required to obtain a "College Reading and Research Course Form" from their College adviser and have it signed both by their faculty reader and by the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Two quarters of this sequence may count as one credit for the EALC major, and are required for any undergraduate writing a B.A. Honors Thesis in EALC. It is highly recommended that students take this sequence autumn and winter, but a spring quarter course is offered for unusual circumstances.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Consent of EALC Director of Undergraduate Studies
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

EALC 29600. Senior Thesis Tutorial II. 100 Units.

Senior Thesis Tutorial-II. PQ: signed consent form. For this course students are required to obtain a "College Reading and Research Course Form" from their College adviser and have it signed both by their faculty reader and by the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Two quarters of this sequence may count as one credit for the EALC major, and are required for any undergraduate writing a B.A. Honors Thesis in EALC. It is highly recommended that students take this sequence autumn and winter, but a spring quarter course is offered for unusual circumstances.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of EALC Director of Undergraduate Studies
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

EALC 29700. Senior Thesis Tutorial III. 100 Units.

The spring quarter section of the Senior Thesis Tutorial is devoted to making corrections and rewrites to the B.A. Paper, which is usually due to the Reader at the end of winter quarter.

Instructor(s): arranged     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): EALC 29500 and/or EALC 29600
Note(s): Students continue to meet with the Preceptor for help with their papers.

EALC 10704. Topics in EALC: The Modern Short Story in East Asia. 100 Units.

Why does the short story emerge as a major literary form across East Asia in the early 20th century? Which institutional, social, and political factors contributed to its diffusion? What are the main characteristics of the short story, how does it organize time and space, and how does it differ from earlier forms of short fiction? What do various authors hope to achieve by writing short stories? Has their writing changed with the rise of new media? Informed by these questions, this course explores the variety of forms that the short story takes in modern East Asia. We will read a selection of influential Chinese, Japanese, and Korean works from the early 20th century to the present, including those by Lu Xun, Shiga Naoya, Hwang Sun-wŏn, Miyamoto Yuriko, Xiao Hong, Na Hye-sŏk, Akutagawa Ryūnosuke, Hoshi Shin'ichi, Lin Bai, Han Shaogong, Yu Hua, and Murakami Haruki, along with theoretical and critical essays. Discussions will be organized around themes that allow for transregional comparisons. All readings in English translation.

Instructor(s): P. Iovene     Terms Offered: Autumn

EALC 24201. China's Eco-Environmental Challenges and Society's Responses. 100 Units.

In nearly four decades of reform and opening policies, China's economic achievements have come at a high cost for its ecological environment; air pollution, water pollution, and soil contamination, among other problems, are facts of life for most Chinese citizens. In addition, China is now the world's biggest emitter of carbon dioxide and has recently acknowledged its contributions to global warming and the need for drastic mitigation of greenhouse gases. Facing these tremendous challenges, remarkable shifts in the way that Chinese society communicates and tackles these problems are occurring. This seminar will look, in particular, at relevant public debates, crucial policies, as well as popular initiatives and protest, to approach this wide topic. How is the relationship between humans/society and nature/environment conceptualized and communicated? Can we detect shifts from traditional to modern, even contemporary 'Chinese approaches'? And to what extent and how do political authorities, media, the general population and scientists in China interact in the face of the acknowledged risks that environmental pollution poses to communities, to China's (economic) development and, not least, to individual health and well-being. Basic knowledge about modern Chinese society and politics as well as Chinese reading skills are helpful, but not a strict requirement for participation in this course.

Instructor(s): A.L. Ahlers     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 34201, ENST 24201

EALC 24256. Everyday Maoism: Revolution, Daily Life, and Material Culture in Socialist China. 100 Units.

The history of Maoist China is usually told as a sequence of political campaigns, from land reform to the Cultural Revolution. Yet for the majority of the Chinese population, the promise of socialism was as much about material transformations as it was about political change: a socialist revolution would bring better living conditions, new work regimes and new consumption patterns. If we want to understand what socialism meant for different groups of people, we have to look at the "new objects" of socialist modernity, at changes in dress codes and apartment layouts, at electrification and city planning - or at the persistence of an older material life under a new socialist veneer. In this course, we will analyze workplaces in order to understand how socialism changed the way people worked, and look at rationing and consumption in the households to see how socialism affected them at home. We will look at how specific objects came to stand in for the Maoist revolution, for socialist modernity, or for feudal backwardness. The course has a strong comparative dimension: we will read some of the literature on socialism in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, to see how Chinese socialism differed from its cousins. Another aim is methodological. How can we understand the lives of people who wrote little and were rarely written about? To which extent can we read people's life experiences out of the material record of their lives?

Instructor(s): J. Eyferth     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This course is almost identical to EALC 24255/34255, except that it is designed for undergradates only.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 24512

EALC 25600. Gender and Modernity in Colonial Korea. 100 Units.

What are the salient forms, manifestations, and performances that can be discussed as aspects found at the intersection between gender experience and Korean colonial modernity? This seminar aims at identifying the characteristics of Japanese or colonially mediated modernization that Koreans experienced in the first half of the twentieth century in order to ultimately generate a broadly meaningful discussion on the texture of colonial cultural experience under its abiding colonial legacy. At the core of the class is a concern with gender. While considering the universal questions of modernized gender, gendered consciousness, and personal/private spaces, discussions will respond to the diverse interests and backgrounds of student participants so as to best facilitate comparative and theoretical discussions on colonial modernity and its postcolonial manifestations.

Instructor(s): K. Choi     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): GNSE 25600, EALC 35600, GNSE 35600

EALC 41005. Early Chinese Texts and Sociological Research. 100 Units.

The use of texts for sociological and cultural inquiry. This year the seminar addresses the theoretical and methodological issues arising from popular culture studies, manuscript culture studies, and the "New Philology."

Instructor(s): Donald Harper     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Consent only

EALC 44612. Inequalities in Chinese Literature and Media. 100 Units.

In this class we will explore how the various forms and dimensions of inequality that characterize contemporary China are reflected in literature, cinema, and internet. We will engage with concepts of subalternity, peasant worker, and new working class, and investigate emerging spaces of self-representation. Readings in Chinese and English. Ample time will be devoted to students' research projects.

Instructor(s): P. Iovene     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Knowledge of modern Chinese
Note(s): Open to undergraduates.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 22612

EALC 48015. Archaeology of Bronze Age China. 100 Units.

Bronze Age" in China conventionally refers to the time period from ca. 2000 BC to about 500 BC, during which bronze, an alloy of copper and other metals such as tin and lead, was the predominant medium used by the society, or to be more precise, the elite classes of the society. Bronze objects, in the forms of vessels, weapons, and musical instruments, were reserved for the upper ruling class of the society and were used mostly as paraphernalia during rituals and feasting. "Bronze Age" in China also indicates the emergence and eventual maturation of states with their bureaucratic systems, the presence of urban centers, a sophisticated writing system, and advanced craft producing industries, especially metal production. This course surveys the important archaeological finds of Bronze Age China and the theoretical issues such as state formation, craft production, writing, bureaucratic systems, urbanization, warfare, and inter-regional interaction, etc. It emphasizes a multi-disciplinary approach with readings and examples from anthropology, archaeology, art history, and epigraphy. This course will also visit the Smart Museum, the Field Museum, and the Art Institute of Chicago to take advantage of the local collections of ancient Chinese arts and archaeology.

Instructor(s): Y. Li     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 26760, EALC 28015, ANTH 46760

EALC 51420. The Literary and Visual Worlds of Xixiang ji. 100 Units.

This course examines the most influential Chinese drama of all times, the Xixiang ji (Romance of the Western Chamber) in light of its multiple literary and visual traditions. Over 100 different woodblock editions, many of them illustrated, were published during the Ming and Qing dynasties alone. The focus of the class will be on close readings of the original texts in classical and early modern vernacular Chinese. We will concentrate on the earliest extant edition of 1498 and Jin Shengtan's annotated and abridged edition of 1656, along with important sets of woodblock illustrations of the play.

Instructor(s): J. Zeitlin     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Good reading skills in both classical and vernacular Chinese. Instructor’s permission required.
Equivalent Course(s): TAPS 51420

EALC 59700. Thesis Research. 100 Units.

For course description contact East Asian Languages.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor

EALC 60000. Reading Course. 100 Units.

Independent reading course

Terms Offered: Autumn Spring Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor

EALC 65000. Directed Translation. 100 Units.

Fulfills translation requirement for EALC graduate students. Must be arranged with individual faculty member. Register by section with EALC faculty.

Terms Offered: Autumn Spring Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor

EALC 10520. Topics in EALC: Gendered Bodies in East Asia. 100 Units.

An introductory course to the study of gender and sexuality in modern and contemporary East Asia, the course examines the ways in which Korea, Japan, and China have undergone the key changes during modernization during the past century. Focus is given to gendered body and its representations-visual, sound, textual, legal, artistic, and cultural traditions, both established and out-of-establishment, as students discuss issues such as identity, love, sex, family, citizenship, law, violence, war, religion, creativity, work, migration, gendered space, and politics, among others, the topics that involve the issue of embodiment in representations and display in varying degrees. Paying attention to the media specificity of the chosen texts, students will close-read and analytically and critically engage various aspects of the relationship between the substance and the medium of the selected texts.

Instructor(s): K. Choi

EALC 10603. Topics in EALC: The Chinese Classics. 100 Units.

In this course we will explore the Chinese classics (Classics of Changes, Documents, Poetry, Spring and Autumn Annals, and the three Ritual classics) at different moments in their traditions: at the time of their first creation, at the time of their canonization as classics, at different moments throughout China's imperial history, and today. Because the Chinese classics have also been regarded as classics in both Korea and Japan, we will also consider their adaptation within those contexts.

Instructor(s): E. Shaughnessy     Terms Offered: Winter

EALC 22451. Social and Economic Institutions of Chinese Socialism, 1949 to 1980. 100 Units.

The socialist period (for our purposes here, c. 1949-1990) fundamentally transformed the institutions of Chinese social and economic life. Marriage and family were redefined; rural communities were reorganized on a collective basis; private property in land and other means of production was abolished. Industrialization created a new urban working class, whose access to welfare, consumer goods, and political rights depended to a large extent on their membership in work units (danwei). Migration between city and countryside came to a halt, and rural and urban society developed in different directions. This course will focus on the concrete details of how this society functioned. How did state planning work? What was it like to work in a socialist factory? What role did money and consumption play in a planned economy? Our readings are in English, but speakers of Chinese are encouraged to use Chinese materials (first-hand sources, if they can be found) for their final papers.

Instructor(s): J. Eyferth     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 34511, HIST 24511, EALC 32451

EALC 22235. Revolutionary Romance in Socialist China. 100 Units.

One of the goals of the socialist revolution was to transform social relations, not only those between classes but also family and romantic relations. One of the first laws that the Chinese Communist Party issued after the founding of the People's Republic was the New Marriage Law, which banned arranged marriages, concubinage, and arrangements involving minors. 1950s cinema and literature advertised romantic love as an important achievement of the new society. At the same time, loyalty to the Party and to the collectivity were also core values that the media emphasized. In this class, we will look at how literature and cinema instructed viewers on how to select one's object of love in Revolutionary China, and how love for a romantic partner, for the party, and for the people were differently foregrounded at specific historical moments. How did ideas of romantic love change from the 1940s to the 1980s, and how did cinema contribute to promoting them? What forms of intimacy and models of attachment characterized revolutionary romance? Which kind of person constituted an ideal romantic partner? Who was to be loved, how, and why? Should one orient one's passion toward one person, many, or none?

Instructor(s): P. Iovene     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 32235

EALC 24626. Japanese Cultures of the Cold War: Literature, Film, Music. 100 Units.

This course is an experiment in rethinking what has conventionally been studied and taught as "postwar Japanese culture" as instances of global Cold War culture. We will look at celebrated works of Japanese fiction, film and popular music from 1945 through 1990, but instead of considering them primarily in relation to the past events of World War Two, we will try to understand them in relation to the unfolding contemporary global situation of the Cold War. We will also look at English-language writing on Japan from during and after the Cold War period. Previous coursework on modern Japanese history or culture is helpful, but not required. All course readings will be in English.

Instructor(s): M. Bourdaghs     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 34626

EALC 43000. Censorship in East Asia: The Case of Colonial Korea. 100 Units.

This course examines the operation and consequences of censorship in the Japanese Empire, with focus on its effects in colonial Korea. It begins with two basic premises: first, both the Japanese colonial authorities' measures of repression, and the Korean responses to them, can be understood as noticeably more staunch and sophisticated when compared to any other region of the Empire; and second, the censorship practices in Korea offers itself as a case that is in itself an effective point of comparison to better understand other censorship operations in general and the impact of these operations across different regions. With a view to probing an inter- and intra-relationship between censorship practices among a variety of imperial/colonial regions, this course studies the institutions related to censorship, the human agents involved in censorship-both external and internal-and texts and translations that were produced in and outside of Korea, and were subject to censorship. Overall, the course stresses the importance of establishing a comparative understanding of the functions of censorship, and on the basis of this comparative thinking we will strive to conceptualize the characteristics of Japanese colonial censorship in Korea.

Instructor(s): K. Choi     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 23001, CRES 33001

EALC 50700. Japanese Literary Theory and Criticism. 100 Units.

This course provides students with an introduction to the practice of modern Japanese literary theory and criticism. We will read seminal works of criticism in their original language, highlighting one key text per decade across the 20th century and pairing each with related criticism produced outside Japan. Critics studied include Natsume Soseki, Nakamura Mitsuo, Ito Sei, Maeda Ai, Karatani Kojin, and Komori Yoichi. While the course offers a longitudinal survey of how theory and crticism have evolved in Japan across the modern period, it also puts this work into dialogue with the evolving global exchange of ideas about how and why we read literature.

Instructor(s): H. Long     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Knowledge of modern Japanese

EALC 10508. Topics in EALC: Popular Culture, Past & Present. 100 Units.

This course explores the influence of popular culture in shaping so-called civilization in China, Japan, and Korea. Among the topics to be addressed are local cults and spirit mediums, food and drink, games, literacy, and mass media.

Instructor(s): D. Harper     Terms Offered: Spring

EALC 10510. Topics in EALC: East Asian Popular Music. 100 Units.

This course surveys a variety of scholarly approaches to the study of popular music in East Asia since 1900, including questions of authenticity, gender, media technologies, circulation, and translation. The course will introduce a variety of musical genres from China, Japan, Korea, Hong Kong and Taiwan, ranging from forms considered 'traditional' to contemporary idol and hiphop music. All readings will be available in English, and no background in music is required or expected.

Instructor(s): M. Bourdaghs     Terms Offered: Spring

EALC 10705. Topics in EALC: Imagining Environment. 100 Units.

This course introduces students to the fiction of East Asia through the themes of nature and environment. How have writers imagined the relation between the human and the non-human in the modern era? How have they drawn on indigenous ideas and attitudes? How have they responded to global environmental change and destruction? The course surveys a variety of sources for environmental imagingings, including philosophical and religious attitudes; aesthetic practices; political ideas; and modern environmentalism. All readings are in English.

Instructor(s): H. Long     Terms Offered: Spring

EALC 24202. Citizenship in China: Concepts, Practices, Dynamics. 100 Units.

How are instances such as the arrest of Gui Minhai, a publisher and Hong Kong business owner who was born in China but has a Swedish passport, in Thailand - apparently by Chinese authorities -, and the large-scale eviction of migrant workers in Beijing due to the lack of residency permits in their own country, related? They raise questions as to how citizenship, i.e. in this case membership in a community, a country/nation state, or a social system is defined and which rights and duties it entails, as well as what are the prerequisites for obtaining and loosing it. In this class we will discuss concepts of citizenship and analyze their representations in modern Chinese society. This includes historical and conceptual-history dimensions and encompasses notions of citizenship that are pertaining to the local, national (incl. empire/civilization), and the global level. Over the course of the semester we will touch upon topics such as forms of inclusion into (and exclusion from) the emerging Chinese 'welfare' model ("social citizenship"), political representation and participation ("political citizenship"), law and rights ("legal citizenship"), domestic and international (im)migration, nationalism, and many more. Basic knowledge about Chinese society and politics as well as Chinese reading skills are helpful, but not a strict requirement for participation in this course.

Instructor(s): A. Ahlers     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Knowledge of Chinese helpful but not required.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 34202

EALC 24411. The Science of Literature. 100 Units.

This course examines the modern history of literature as an object of scientific study. In particular, it introduces key moments in the conversation between quantitative methods and literary intepretation from the late-19th century to today. These include physiological theories of the novel; stylistics; book history; sociologies of reading; distant reading; and cultural analytics. At each moment we consider the intellectual contexts that encouraged dialogue between the sciences and literature; probe the theories and models by which this dialogue was framed; and consider its relevance to the practice of literary criticism today.

Instructor(s): H. Long     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 34411, ENGL 24422, ENGL 34422

EALC 45405. The Leftover Zhou Documents. 100 Units.

In this graduate reading course, we will focus on the Yi Zhou shu or Leftover Zhou Documents, supposed to be a collection of documents that Confucius did not include in the classic Shang shu or Documents on High. We will study the text as a whole, and also sample individual chapters from different parts of the text and from different historical contexts, including especially texts for which there are now bamboo-slip manuscripts. Students should have a good command of classical Chinese.

Instructor(s): E. Shaughnessy     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Knowledge of classical Chinese

EALC 46610. Rethinking Meiji Literature: Historicizing Modernity. 100 Units.

This course will survey recent scholarship, in both English and Japanese, on literature of the Meiji period (1868-1912). We will read a number of recent studies of the period by both Japanese and Anglophone scholars. We will also read several works of Meiji poetry and fiction in the original Japanese. Among the topics we will focus on are gender and sexuality, imperialism, the rise of modern media, and the invention of new writing styles and national language. Readings will be in English and Japanese.

Instructor(s): M. Bourdaghs     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Advanced reading ability in Japanese

CHINESE COURSES

CHIN 10100-10200-10300. Elementary Modern Chinese I-II-III.

This three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese. By the end of Spring Quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. In Spring Quarter, students are required to submit a video project for the Chinese Video Project Award. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week. A drill session with the TA is held one hour a week in addition to scheduled class time. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted. Two sections.

CHIN 10100. Elementary Modern Chinese I. 100 Units.

This three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese. By the end of Spring Quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. In Spring Quarter, students are required to submit a video project for the Chinese Video Project Award. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week. A drill session with the TA is held one hour a week in addition to scheduled class time. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Consent of EALC Director of Undergraduate Studies

CHIN 10200. Elementary Modern Chinese II. 100 Units.

Part 2 of this three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese. By the end of the spring quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. A video project is required in spring quarter, which will be entered in the competition for the Chinese Video Project Award. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week. Additional small group discussions of 40 minutes per week will be arranged. Maximum enrollment for each section is 18.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 10100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

CHIN 10300. Elementary Modern Chinese III. 100 Units.

Part 3 of this three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese. By the end of the spring quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. A video project is required in spring quarter, which will be entered in the competition for the Chinese Video Project Award. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week. Additional small group discussions of 40 minutes per week will be arranged. Maximum enrollment for each section is 18.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 10200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 33300

CHIN 11100-11200-11300. First-Year Chinese for Bilingual Speakers I-II-III.

This three-quarter series is intended for bilingual speakers of Chinese. Our objectives include teaching students standard pronunciation and basic skills in reading and writing, while broadening their communication skills for a wider range of contexts and functions. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week. Consultation with instructor encouraged prior to enrollment. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

CHIN 11100. First-Year Chinese for Bilingual Speakers I. 100 Units.

Part 1 of this three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese to bilingual speakers. Bilingual Speakers are those who can speak Chinese but do not know how to read or write. By the end of the spring quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. A video project is required in spring quarter, which will be entered in the competition for the Chinese Video Project Award. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week MWF. Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Consent of Director of Chinese Language Program

CHIN 11200. First-Year Chinese for Bilingual Speakers II. 100 Units.

Part 2 of this three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese to bilingual speakers. Bilingual Speakers are those who can speak Chinese but do not know how to read or write. By the end of the spring quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. A video project is required in spring quarter, which will be entered in the competition for the Chinese Video Project Award. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week MWF.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 11100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

CHIN 11300. First -Yr. Chinese for Bilinqual Speakers II. 100 Units.

Part 3 of this three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese to bilingual speakers. Bilingual Speakers are those who can speak Chinese but do not know how to read or write. By the end of the spring quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. A video project is required in spring quarter, which will be entered in the competition for the Chinese Video Project Award. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week MWF.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 11200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

CHIN 15000. Chinese in Beijing. 100 Units.

CHIN 20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Modern Chinese I-II-III.

The goal of this sequence is to enhance students’ reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics at an intermediate linguistic level. In addition to mastering the content of the textbook, students are required to complete two language projects each quarter. Chinese computing skills are also taught. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted. Two sections.

CHIN 20100. Intermediate Modern Chinese I. 100 Units.

Part 1 of this sequence aims to enhance students' reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics at an intermediate linguistic level. In addition to mastering the content of the textbook, students are required to complete two language projects each quarter. Chinese computing skills are also taught. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 10300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

CHIN 20200. Intermediate Modern Chinese II. 100 Units.

Part 2 of this sequence aims to enhance students' reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics at an intermediate linguistic level. In addition to mastering the content of the textbook, students are required to complete two language projects each quarter. Chinese computing skills are also taught. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

CHIN 20300. Intermediate Modern Chinese III. 100 Units.

Part 3 of this sequence aims to enhance students' reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics at an intermediate linguistic level. In addition to mastering the content of the textbook, students are required to complete two language projects each quarter. Chinese computing skills are also taught. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 34300

CHIN 30200. Advanced Modern Chinese-2. 100 Units.

The goal of this sequence is to help students develop advanced proficiency in reading, listening, speaking, and writing. This sequence emphasizes more advanced grammatical structures. We begin with discussion in Chinese on topics relevant to modern China and then shift to authentic Chinese texts in an effort to better prepare students to deal with original Chinese source materials. Discussion in Chinese required. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week.

Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20402

CHIN 31100-31200-31300. Business Chinese I-II-III.

This three-quarter sequence aims at improving overall language skills and introduces business terminology. Students learn about companies and their services and/or products, the stock market, real estate market, insurance, and e-commerce. The class meets for three ninety-minute sessions a week.

CHIN 31100. Business Chinese I. 100 Units.

Part one of this three-quarter sequence aims at improving overall language skills and introduces business terminology. Students will learn about companies and their services and/or products, the stock market, real estate market, insurance, and e-commerce. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20701

CHIN 31200. Business Chinese II. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20701, or CHIN 31100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20702

CHIN 31300. Business Chinese III. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20702, or CHIN 31200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20703

CHIN 41200. Fourth-Year Modern Chinese-2. 100 Units.

This sequence introduces a range of influential literary works and scholarly essays on Chinese cultural and social issues from the 1920s to the 1990s. Students not only expand their vocabulary and knowledge of grammatical structures but also learn sophisticated speaking and writing skills through intensive readings and discussions. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 41100, or CHIN 20501, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20502

CHIN 21100-21200-21300. Accelerated Modern Chinese for Bilingual Speakers I-II-III.

This three-quarter sequence offers texts from both Intermediate Modern Chinese (CHIN 20100-20200-20300) and Advanced Modern Chinese (CHIN 30100-30200-30300). Our goal is to help bilingual students further develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Extensive reading is encouraged, and writing is strongly emphasized. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week.

CHIN 21100. Accelerated Modern Chinese for Heritage/Bilingual Speakers I. 100 Units.

This three-quarter sequence is intended for bilingual/heritage speakers of Mandarin Chinese. Paralleled with the Intermediate sequence for non-heritage speakers, the goal of this sequence is to further develop students' reading, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics in personal settings and some academic or professional settings. Upon completing this sequence, students are expected to pass the Practical Proficiency Test to earn a certificate on their transcript. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week. No auditors permitted.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): PQ: Chin 11300 or placement of 20100. Students must take a quality grade.
Note(s): No auditors permitted.

CHIN 21200. Accelerated Modern Chinese for Heritage/Bilingual Speakers II. 100 Units.

This three-quarter sequence is intended for bilingual/heritage speakers of Mandarin Chinese. Paralleled with the Intermediate sequence for non-heritage speakers, the goal of this sequence is to further develop students' reading, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics in personal settings and some academic or professional settings. Upon completing this sequence, students are expected to pass the Practical Proficiency Test to earn a certificate on their transcript. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week. No auditors permitted.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 21100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): No auditors permitted.

CHIN 21300. Accelerated Modern Chinese for Heritage/Bilingual Speakers III. 100 Units.

Students must take for a quality grade. This three-quarter sequence is intended for bilingual/heritage speakers of Mandarin Chinese. Paralleled with the Intermediate sequence for non-heritage speakers, the goal of this sequence is to further develop students' reading, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics in personal settings and some academic or professional settings. Upon completing this sequence, students are expected to pass the Practical Proficiency Test to earn a certificate on their transcript. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week. No auditors are permitted.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 21200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): No auditors permitted.

CHIN 20800-20900-21000. Elementary Literary Chinese I-II-III.

This sequence introduces the basic grammar of the written Chinese language from the time of the Confucian Analects to the literary movements at the beginning of the twentieth century. Students will read original texts of genres that include philosophy, memorials, and historical narratives. Spring Quarter is devoted exclusively to reading poetry. The class meets for two eighty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

CHIN 20800. Elementary Literary Chinese I. 100 Units.

Must be taken for a letter grade. This course introduces the basic grammar of the written Chinese language from the time of the Confucian Analects to the literary movements at the beginning of the twentieth century. Students will read original texts of genres that include philosophy, memorials, and historical narratives. Spring Quarter is devoted exclusively to reading poetry.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20300, or placement, or consent of instructor

CHIN 20900. Elementary Literary Chinese II. 100 Units.

Must be taken for a letter grade. This sequence introduces the basic grammar of the written Chinese language from the time of the Confucian Analects to the literary movements at the beginning of the twentieth century. Students will read original texts of genres that include philosophy, memorials, and historical narratives. Spring Quarter is devoted exclusively to reading poetry.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20800, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 30900

CHIN 21000. Elementary Literary Chinese III. 100 Units.

Must be taken for a letter grade. This course introduces students to the basic grammar of the written Chinese language from the time of the Confucian Analects of the literary movements at the beginning of the twentieth century. Students read original texts of various genres including philosophy, memorials, poetry, and historical narratives; and third quarter is devoted solely to reading poetry.

Instructor(s): D. Harper     Terms Offered: TBD
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20900, or placement, or consent of instructor

CHIN 60000. Rdg Crse: Spec Topic Chinese. 100 Units.

CHIN 60100. Directed Rdg: Adv Chinese. 100 Units.

JAPANESE COURSES

JAPN 10100-10200-10300. Elementary Modern Japanese I-II-III.

This is the first year of a three-year program, which is intended to provide students with a thorough grounding in modern Japanese. Grammar, idiomatic expressions, and vocabulary are learned through oral work, reading, and writing in and out of class. Daily practice in speaking, listening, reading, and writing is crucial. Students should plan to continue their language study through at least the second-year level to make their skills practical. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

JAPN 10100. Elementary Modern Japanese-1. 100 Units.

This is the first year of a three-year program, which is intended to provide students with a thorough grounding in modern Japanese. Grammar, idiomatic expressions, and vocabulary are learned through oral work, reading, and writing in and out of class. Daily practice in speaking, listening, reading, and writing is crucial. Students should plan to continue their language study through at least the second-year level to make their skills practical. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 10200. Elementary Modern Japanese II. 100 Units.

Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted. This is the first year of a three-year program designed to provide students with a thorough grounding in Modern Japanese. Grammar, idiomatic expressions, and vocabulary are learned through oral work, reading, and writing in and out of class. Daily practice in speaking, listening, reading and writing is crucial. Students should plan to continue their language study through at least the second-year level to make their skills practical. The class meets for five fifty-minute periods a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 10100, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 10300. Elementary Modern Japanese-III. 100 Units.

This is the first year of a three-year program designed to provide students with a thorough grounding in Modern Japanese. Grammar, idiomatic expressions, and vocabulary are learned through oral work, reading, and writing in and out of class. Daily practice in speaking, listening, reading and writing is crucial. Students should plan to continue their language study through at least the second-year level to make their skills practical. The class meets for five fifty-minute periods a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 10200, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Modern Japanese I-II-III.

The emphasis on spoken language in the first half of the course gradually shifts toward reading and writing in the latter half. Classes conducted mostly in Japanese. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

JAPN 20100. Intermediate Modern Japanese I. 100 Units.

The emphasis on spoken language in the first half of the course gradually shifts toward reading and writing in the latter half. The course is conducted mostly in Japanese and meets for five fifty-minute periods a week. Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 10300, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 20200. Intermediate Modern Japanese II. 100 Units.

The emphasis on spoken language in the first half of the course gradually shifts toward reading and writing in the latter half. The course is conducted mostly in Japanese and meets for five fifty-minute periods a week.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade.

JAPN 20300. Intermediate Modern Japanese III. 100 Units.

The emphasis on spoken language in the first half of the course gradually shifts toward reading and writing in the latter half. The course is conducted mostly in Japanese and meets for five fifty-minute periods a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 32300

JAPN 21200-21300. Intermediate Modern Japanese through Japanimation I-II.

This sequence focuses on learning spoken Japanese that is aimed at native speakers. Our goals are to get students accustomed to that sort of authentic Japanese and to enable them to speak with high fluency. To keep the balance, writing and reading materials are provided. Students are encouraged to watch videos and practice their speaking.

JAPN 21200. Intermediate Modern Japanese Through Japanimation I. 100 Units.

This course focuses on learning spoken Japanese that is aimed at native speakers. The goals are getting accustomed to that sort of authentic Japanese and being able to speak with a high degree of fluency. To keep a balance, writing and reading materials are provided. Watching videos and practicing speaking are the keys to success in this course.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20100, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 21300. Intermediate Modern Japanese through Japanimation II. 100 Units.

This course focuses on learning spoken Japanese that is aimed at native speakers. The goals are getting accustomed to that sort of authentic Japanese and being able to speak with a high degree of fluency. To keep a balance, writing and reading materials are provided. Watching videos and practicing speaking are the keys to success in this course.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 21200, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 20401-20402-20403. Advanced Modern Japanese I-II-III.

The third year marks the end of the basic modern language study. Our goal is to help students learn to understand authentic written and spoken materials with reasonable ease. The texts are all authentic materials with some study aids. Classes conducted in Japanese. The class meets for three eighty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

JAPN 20401. Advanced Modern Japanese-1. 100 Units.

The third year marks the end of the basic modern language study. Our goal is to help students learn to understand authentic written and spoken materials with reasonable ease. The texts are all authentic materials with some study aids. Classes conducted in Japanese. The class meets for three eighty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 30100

JAPN 20402. Advanced Modern Japanese II. 100 Units.

The third year marks the end of the basic modern language study. Our goal is to help students learn to understand authentic written and spoken materials with reasonable ease. The texts are all authentic materials with some study aids. Classes conducted in Japanese. The class meets for three eighty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20401, or JAPN 30100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 30200

JAPN 20403. Advanced Modern Japanese III. 100 Units.

The third year marks the end of the basic modern language study. The purpose of the course is to help students learn to understand authentic written and spoken materials with reasonable ease. The texts are all authentic materials with some study aids. All work in Japanese. The class meets for three eighty-minute periods a week.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20402, or JAPN 30200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 30300

JAPN 24900. Pre-Modern Japanese: Kindai Bungo I. 100 Units.

This course focuses on the reading of scholarly Japanese materials with the goal of enabling students to do independent research in Japanese after the course's completion. Readings are from historical materials written in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20300 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 34900

JAPN 20600. 4th Year Modern Japanese-2. 100 Units.

Open to both undergraduates and graduates. This course is designed to improve Japanese reading, speaking, writing and listening ability to the advanced high level as measured by the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Proficiency Guidelines. Weekly assignments will require students to tackle modern Japanese texts of varying length and difficulty. Organized around a range of thought-provoking themes (from brain death and organ transplants to Japanese values on work and religion), reading assignments will include academic theses in psychology and anthropology, literary texts, and popular journalism. After completing the readings, students will be encouraged to discuss each topic in class. Videos/DVDs will be used to improve listening comprehension skills. There will also be writing assignments.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20500, or JAPN 40500, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 40600

KOREAN COURSES

KORE 10100-10200-10300. Introduction to the Korean Language I-II-III.

This introductory sequence is designed to provide a basic foundation in modern Korean language and culture by focusing on the balanced development of the four basic language skills of speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Students in KORE 10100 begin by learning the complete Korean writing system (Hangul), which is followed by lessons focusing on basic conversational skills and grammatical structures. To provide sufficient opportunities to apply what has been learned in class, there are small group drill sessions, weekly Korean television drama screenings, and a number of other cultural activities (e.g., Korean New Year’s game competitions). The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

KORE 10100. Introduction to the Korean Language I. 100 Units.

This introductory course is designed to provide beginners with a solid foundation in modern Korean focusing on the balanced development of the four basic language skills of speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Along with basic conversational and grammatical patterns, the course introduces students to Korean culture through various channels such as Korean movies, music, and a number of other cultural activities. Must be taken for a letter grade.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Placement, or consent of instructor

KORE 10200. Introduction to the Korean Language II. 100 Units.

Must be taken for a letter grade. This introductory course is designed to provide beginners with a solid foundation in modern Korean focusing on the balanced development of the four basic language skills of speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Along with basic conversational and grammatical patterns, the course introduces students to Korean culture through various channels such as Korean movies, music, and a number of other cultural activities.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): KORE 10100, or placement, or consent of instructor

KORE 10300. Introduction to the Korean Language III. 100 Units.

Must be taken for a letter grade. This introductory course is designed to provide beginners with a solid foundation in modern Korean focusing on the balanced development of the four basic language skills of speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Along with basic conversational and grammatical patterns, the course introduces students to Korean culture through various channels such as Korean movies, music, and a number of other cultural activities.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KORE 10200, or placement, or consent of instructor

KORE 20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Korean I-II-III.

As a continuation of KORE 10100-10200-10300, this sequence is intended to continue to build on students’ language skills with an emphasis on enhancing the speaking ability, presentational skills, composition writing skills, and usage of more complex constructions. Approximately 150 Chinese characters are introduced for the achievement of basic literacy and vocabulary expansion. The curriculum also includes media, authentic reading materials, and weekly Korean language table meetings to maximize cultural exposure and opportunities to apply Korean language skills in real life situations. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

KORE 20100. Intermediate Korean I. 100 Units.

As a continuation of KORE 10100-10200-10300, this sequence is intended to continue to build on students' language skills with an emphasis on enhancing the speaking ability, presentational skills, composition writing skills, and usage of more complex constructions. Approximately 150 Chinese characters are introduced for the achievement of basic literacy and vocabulary expansion. The curriculum also includes media, authentic reading materials, and weekly Korean language table meetings to maximize cultural exposure and opportunities to apply Korean language skills in real life situations. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): KORE 10300, or placement, or consent of instructor

KORE 20200. Intermediate Korean-2. 100 Units.

As a continuation of Beginning Korean, this course is to help students increase their communication skills (both oral and written) in the Korean language. Through an integrated framework of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, this course aims to increase fluency and accuracy in Korean. Videotapes and additional reading materials will be used in a supplementary fashion and approximately 100 Chinese characters will be introduced for the achievement of basic literacy. Classes are conducted mostly in Korean and meet for fifty-minute periods five times a week. Must be taken for a letter grade.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20100, or placement, or consent of instructor

KORE 20300. Intermediate Korean III. 100 Units.

As a continuation of Beginning Korean, this course is to help students increase their communication skills (both oral and written) in the Korean language. Through an integrated framework of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, this course aims to increase fluency and accuracy in Korean. Videotapes and additional reading materials will be used in a supplementary fashion and approximately 100 Chinese characters will be introduced for the achievement of basic literacy. Classes are conducted mostly in Korean and meet for fifty-minute periods five times a week. Must be taken for a letter grade.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20200, or placement, or consent of instructor

KORE 30100-30200-30300. Advanced Korean I-II-III.

This course introduces a wide selection of authentic reading materials from Korean newspaper articles, college-level textbooks, and literary prose as an entry point to discuss topics and issues in Korean society, culture, and history. The primary objective is further enhancement of advanced reading comprehension, composition writing, and presentational skills. In addition, Chinese character (Hanja) lessons are incorporated into each lesson with the purpose of expanding vocabulary to the advanced level. The class meets for two eighty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

KORE 30100. Advanced Korean I. 100 Units.

This sequence introduces a wide selection of authentic reading materials from Korean newspaper articles, college-level textbooks, and literary prose as an entry point to discuss topics and issues in Korean society, culture, and history. The primary objective is further enhancement of advanced reading comprehension, composition writing, and presentational skills. In addition, Chinese character (Hanja) lessons are incorporated into each lesson with the purpose of expanding vocabulary to the advanced level. The class meets for two eighty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 20401

KORE 30200. Advanced Korean-2. 100 Units.

For graduates and advanced undergraduates. Must be taken for a letter grade. This course introduces readings from a wide selection of written styles including journalistic pieces, college-level textbooks and literary prose. The class focuses on exercises in reading comprehension and discussions on various topics/issues related to contemporary Korea. Some audio and videotapes (e.g., televised news programs, movies, and dramas) will be used in order to improve the students' capacity in advanced Korean. Classes are conducted in Korean and meet for eighty-minute periods two times a week.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20401, or KORE 30100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 20402

KORE 30300. Advanced Korean-3. 100 Units.

This course introduces readings from a wide selection of written styles including journalistic pieces, college-level textbooks and literary prose. The class focuses on exercises in reading comprehension and discussions on various topics/issues related to contemporary Korea. Some audio and videotapes (e.g., televised news programs, movies, and dramas) will be used in order to improve the students' capacity in advanced Korean. Classes are conducted in Koran and meet for eighty-minute periods two times a week.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20402, or KORE 30400, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 20403

KORE 41100. Fourth Year Korean I. 100 Units.

The first in a series of three consecutive courses focuses on improving speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills to high-advanced level. Through intensive readings and discussions, students will build extensive vocabulary and complex grammatical structures as well as developing sophisticated speaking skills and academic writing skills. The materials introduced in this class include newspaper articles dealing with current social, cultural, or economic issues in Korea, literary works such as poems and novels, and authentic media such as TV documentaries or movies.

Equivalent Course(s): KORE 21100

KORE 41200. Fourth-Year Modern Korean II. 100 Units.

The second of three consecutive courses focuses on improving speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills to high-advanced level. Through intensive readings and discussions, students will build extensive vocabulary and complex grammatical structures as well as developing sophisticated speaking skills and academic writing skills. The materials introduced in this class include newspaper articles dealing with current social, cultural, or economic issues in Korea, literary works such as poems and novels, and authentic media such as TV documentaries or movies.

Equivalent Course(s): KORE 21200