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Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations

Department Website: http://ealc.uchicago.edu

Chair

  • Jacob Eyferth

Director of Graduate Studies

  • Paul Copp

Director of Undergraduate Studies

  • Ariel Fox

Professors

  • Michael K. Bourdaghs
  • Donald Harper
  • James Ketelaar (also with History)
  • Haun Saussy (also with Comparative Literature)
  • Edward L. Shaughnessy
  • Hung Wu (also with Art History)
  • Judith Zeitlin

Associate Professors

  • Guy S. Alitto (also with History)
  • Susan Burns (also with History)
  • Paul Copp
  • Kyeong Hee Choi
  • Jacob Eyferth (also with History)
  • Paola Iovene
  • Yung-ti Li
  • Hoyt Long

Assistant Professors

  • Ariel Fox

Senior Lecturers

  • Fangpei Cai
  • Harumi Lory
  • Hiroyoshi Noto
  • Youqin Wang
  • Jun Yang

Lecturers

  • Yoko Katagiri
  • Ji Eun Kim
  • Yi-Lu Kuo
  • Meng Li
  • Misa Miyachi
  • Wan Kyung Na
  • Laura Skosey
  • Shan Xiang

Emeritus Faculty

  • George Chih Chao 
  • Norma Field
  • Tetsuo Najita, History
  • Tsuen Hsuin Tsien

Program Description

The Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations is a multidisciplinary department, with faculty specialists in history, art, philosophy, languages, linguistics, literature, and religions, that offers a program of advanced study of the traditional and modern cultures of China, Japan, and Korea. At the same time, students are encouraged to pursue their interests across traditional disciplinary lines by taking courses in other departments in the Divisions of the Social Sciences and the Humanities.

The Department admits applicants only for the Ph.D. degree, and does not offer a terminal M.A. program. Students who arrive with a master's degree will be expected to fulfill the 18-course requirement. Students interested in a terminal M.A. degree should contact the University of Chicago Master of Arts Program in the Humanities or the Master of Arts Program in Social Sciences.

Students admitted to doctoral study are typically awarded a five-year fellowship package that includes full tuition, academic year stipends, summer stipends, and medical insurance. Teaching training is a vital part of the educational experience at the University, so all fellowships include a required teaching component. 

During the first two years, students take nine courses each year. Depending on students' interests and preparation, some of the coursework may take place outside the Department. It may also include work in language, either the primary language of study or a secondary one, whether East Asian or not, as well as in a second East Asian civilization. Many students may also wish to spend one or more years in Japan, China, Taiwan, or Korea to achieve language mastery or do research for their dissertation. Teaching opportunities for students are also available.

After the Ph.D. qualifying exam, which consists of both an oral and written component, acceptance of a dissertation proposal admits a student to candidacy. Students are expected to write and defend dissertations that make original contributions to knowledge. The degree is conferred upon the successful defense of the completed dissertation.

Contact

Dawn Brennan, Department Coordinator

Wieboldt Hall, Room 301

1050 East 58th Street

Chicago, IL 60637

Phone: 773.702.1255

ealc@uchicago.edu

Website: ealc.uchicago.edu 

Information on How to Apply

The application process for admission and financial aid for all graduate programs in Humanities is administered through the divisional Office of the Dean of Students. The application for Admission and Financial Aid, with instructions, deadlines, and department specific information is available online at: http://humanities.uchicago.edu/students/admissions.

Questions pertaining to admissions and aid should be directed to humanitiesadmissions@uchicago.edu or (773) 702-1552.

Foreign students must provide evidence of English proficiency by submitting scores from either the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS).

For additional information about the East Asian Languages and Civilizations program, please see http://ealc.uchicago.edu or call (773) 702-1255.

Program Requirements

The requirements are filled in three stages: Masters Degree Requirements (for students entering with or without an M.A. in East Asian Studies), Ph.D. Candidacy Requirements, and Ph.D. Degree Requirements.

Master's Degree Requirements

  1. Complete eighteen courses
    1. One course should be EALC 65000 Directed Translation, although the translation requirement can be met in other ways.
    2. No more than two courses taken for an "R" or "P" grade
    3. Two non-specialization East Asian Civilization courses
  2. No outstanding Incompletes
  3. Courses or Placement at the third year level of one East Asian Language.
  4. One M.A. thesis or two M.A. papers

Ph.D. Candidacy Requirements

  1. Second East Asian Language
  2. Mastery of Languages required for primary research
  3. Proficiency in any additional languages required for research
  4. Pass PhD Qualifying Exams
  5. Defense and approval of Dissertation Proposal

Once the student has passed the dissertation proposal defense, the Department will certify that the student has met all the requirements for Admission to Candidacy (all requirements for degree with the exception of the dissertation). The Department will submit paperwork to the Office of the Dean of Students that recommends that the student be admitted to candidacy for the PhD degree.

Ph.D. Degree Requirements

  1. Admission to Ph.D. Candidacy
  2. Approval and Defense  of the Dissertation

Joint Ph.D. Program in East Asian Cinema

The Program in Cinema and Media Studies and the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations have formed a joint Ph.D. program in East Asian cinema at the University of Chicago. The University has long-standing engagement with both Film and East Asian studies and has already graduated a number of scholars who are changing the field of East Asian cinema around the world. The purpose of this degree program is to provide the best possible training in the methods, languages, and cultural contexts needed to undertake original research on specific topics in East Asian cinema and media studies.  Students interested in following this course of study will first apply directly to either the Program in Cinema and Media Studies or to the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations.

You can see up-to-date course listings at our website, ealc.uchicago.edu, or on the registrar's Times Schedules at http://timeschedules.uchicago.edu/.

East Asian Languages & Civilizations - Chinese Courses

CHIN 30100-30200-30300. Advanced Modern Chinese I-II-III.

The goal of this sequence is to help students develop advanced proficiency in reading, listening, speaking, and writing. This sequence emphasizes more advanced grammatical structures. We begin with discussion in Chinese on topics relevant to modern China and then shift to authentic Chinese texts in an effort to better prepare students to deal with original Chinese source materials. Discussion in Chinese required. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week.

CHIN 30100. Advanced Modern Chinese I. 100 Units.

The goal of this sequence is to help students develop advanced proficiency in reading, listening, speaking, and writing. This sequence emphasizes more advanced grammatical structures. We begin with discussion in Chinese on topics relevant to modern China and then shift to authentic Chinese texts in an effort to better prepare students to deal with original Chinese source materials. Discussion in Chinese required. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20401

CHIN 30200. Advanced Modern Chinese II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20401, or CHIN 30100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20402

CHIN 30300. Advanced Modern Chinese III. 100 Units.

For both graduates and undergraduates. The goal of this sequence is to help students develop advanced proficiency in reading, listening, speaking, and writing. This sequence emphasizes more advanced grammatical structures, and requires discussion in Chinese on topics relevant to modern China. Over the course of this sequence, the emphasis will shift to authentic Chinese texts in an effort to better prepare students to deal with orginal Chinese source materials. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20402, or CHIN 30200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20403

CHIN 30800. Elementary Literary Chinese I. 100 Units.

Must be taken for a letter grade. This course introduces students to the basic grammar of the written Chinese language from the time of the Confucian Analects fo the literary movements at the beginning of the twentieth century. Students read orginal texts of various genres including philosophy, memorials, poetry, and historical narratives; and third quarter is devoted solely to reading poetry. 

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20800

CHIN 30900. Elementary Literary Chinese II. 100 Units.

Must be taken for a letter grade. This course introduces students to the basic grammar of the written Chinese language from the time of the Confucian Analects fo the literary movements at the beginning of the twentieth century. Students read orginal texts of various genres including philosophy, memorials, poetry, and historical narratives; and third quarter is devoted solely to reading poetry. 

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20800, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20900

CHIN 31800. Introduction to Classical Chinese Poetry. 100 Units.

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of Classical Chinese lyric poetry. The emphasis is on learning how to read poems in the original, but some critical writings in English on Chinese poetry and poetics will also be assigned to provide a context for interpretation.

Instructor(s): Judith Zeitlin     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Good knowledge of Chinese characters/Kanji. Previous quarters of Literary Chinese desirable but can be taken independently with consent of instructor.
Note(s): May be counted as a content course for EALC majors and minors.
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 21800,EALC 31800

CHIN 31801. Introduction to Classical Chinese Poetry. 100 Units.

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of Classical lyric poetry. The emphasis is on learning how to read poems in the original, but some critical writings in English on Chinese poetry and poetics will also be assigned to provide a context for interpretation.

Instructor(s): Judith Zeitlin     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Two quarters of elementary Literary Chinese or consent
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 21801,EALC 31801

CHIN 33300. Elementary Modern Chinese III. 100 Units.

Part 3 of this three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese. By the end of the spring quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. A video project is required in spring quarter, which will be entered in the competition for the Chinese Video Project Award. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week. Additional small group discussions of 40 minutes per week will be arranged. Maximum enrollment for each section is 18.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 10200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 10300

CHIN 40800-40900-41000. Readings in Literary Chinese I-II-III.

Readings in Literary Chinese I-II-III

CHIN 40800. Readings in Literary Chinese I. 100 Units.

Reading and discussion nineteenth- and early twentienth-century historical political documents, including such forms as memorials, decrees, local gazetteers, diplomatic communications, essays, and the like.

Instructor(s): D. Harper     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 21000, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20508

CHIN 40900. Readings in Literary Chinese II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 40800, or CHIN 20508, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Not offered every year; quarters vary.
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20509

CHIN 41000. Readings in Literary Chinese III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 40900, or CHIN 20509, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Not offered every year; quarters vary.
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20510

CHIN 41100-41200-41300. Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I-II-III.

This sequence introduces a range of influential literary works and scholarly essays on Chinese cultural and social issues from the 1920s to the 1990s. Students not only expand their vocabulary and knowledge of grammatical structures but also learn sophisticated speaking and writing skills through intensive readings and discussions. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week.

CHIN 41100. Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I. 100 Units.

This sequence introduces a range of influential literary works and scholarly essays on Chinese cultural and social issues from the 1920s to the 1990s. Students not only expand their vocabulary and knowledge of grammatical structures but also learn sophisticated speaking and writing skills through intensive readings and discussions. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 30300, or CHIN 20403, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20501

CHIN 41200. Fourth-Year Modern Chinese II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 41100, or CHIN 20501, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20502

CHIN 41300. Fourth-Year Modern Chinese III. 100 Units.

Must be taken for a letter grade.  For both graduates and undergraduates. This sequence introduces a range of influential literary works and scholarly essays on Chinese cultural and social issues from the 1920s to the 1990s. Students will not only expand their volcabulary and knowledge of grammatical structures, but also learn sophisticated speaking and writing skills through intensive readings and discussions. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 41200, or CHIN 20502, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20503

CHIN 51100-51200-51300. Fifth-Year Modern Chinese I-II-III.

This sequence is designed to prepare students for academic research and activities in a Chinese language environment. Modern classic essays, documentary film and TV broadcasts will be included among the teaching materials. Students will learn not only general listening, speaking and reading skills but also academic writing. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week. Students can arrange two additional one-on-one tutorial sessions to prepare for assigned language projects.

CHIN 51100. Fifth-Year Modern Chinese I. 100 Units.

This sequence is designed to prepare students for academic research and activities in a Chinese language environment. Modern classic essays, documentary film and TV broadcasts will be included among the teaching materials. Students will learn not only general listening, speaking and reading skills but also academic writing. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week. Students can arrange two additional one-on-one tutorial sessions to prepare for assigned language projects.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 41300, or CHIN 20503, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20601

CHIN 51200. Fifth-Year Modern Chinese II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 51100, or CHIN 20601, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20602

CHIN 51300. Fifth-Year Modern Chinese III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 51200, or CHIN 20602, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20603

CHIN 61100. Sixth-year Modern Chinese. 100 Units.

This course is designed to help students attain the proficiency level of a well-educated Chinese speaker. Teaching materials include TV programs, novels, movies, newspaper articles, WeChat conversations and research papers published in recent years. This course also teaches students how to use Chinese reference materials for their research. The class meets for two 90-munite sessions each week. Two additional one-on-one tutorial sessions during the quarter will be arranged for each student to prepare for their language projects and special research needs.

Instructor(s): Youqin Wang     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20603/51300, placement or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20611

East Asian Languages & Civilizations - Japanese Courses

JAPN 30100-30200-30300. Advanced Modern Japanese I-II-III.

The third year marks the end of the basic modern language study. Our goal is to help students learn to understand authentic written and spoken materials with reasonable ease. The texts are all authentic materials with some study aids. Classes conducted in Japanese. The class meets for three eighty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

JAPN 30100. Advanced Modern Japanese I. 100 Units.

The third year marks the end of the basic modern language study. Our goal is to help students learn to understand authentic written and spoken materials with reasonable ease. The texts are all authentic materials with some study aids. Classes conducted in Japanese. The class meets for three eighty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 20401

JAPN 30200. Advanced Modern Japanese II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20401, or JAPN 30100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 20402

JAPN 30300. Advanced Modern Japanese III. 100 Units.

 The third year marks the end of the basic modern language study. The purpose of the course is to help students learn to understand authentic written and spoken materials with reasonable ease. The texts are all authentic materials with some study aids. All work in Japanese. The class meets for three eighty-minute periods a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20402, or JAPN 30200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 20403

JAPN 30800-30900-31000. Reading Scholarly Japanese I-II-III.

This course focuses on the reading of scholarly Japanese materials with the goal of enabling students to do independent research in Japanese after the course’s completion. The materials are selected from a wide range of disciplines covering the past three centuries

JAPN 30800. Reading Scholarly Japanese I. 100 Units.

This course focuses on reading of scholarly Japanese materials that will enable students to read academic Japanese. The materials are selected from a wide range of disciplines by the instructor and by students.

Instructor(s): H. Noto     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 20800

JAPN 30900. Reading Scholarly Japanese II. 100 Units.

This course focuses on reading of scholarly Japanese materials that will enable students to read academic Japanese. The materials are selected from a wide range of disciplines by the instructor and by students.

Instructor(s): H. Noto     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20900/30900, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 20900

JAPN 31000. Reading Scholarly Japanese III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20300, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 31100. Elementary Modern Japanese I. 100 Units.

PQ: Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted. This is the first year of a three-year probram designed to provide students with a thorough grounding in Modern Japanese. Grammar, idiomatic expressions, and vocubulary are learned through oral work, reading, and writing in and out of class. Daily practice in speaking, listening, reading and writing is crucial. Students should plan to continue their language study through at least the second-year level to make their skills practical. The class meets for fove fifty-minute periods a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 10100

JAPN 31200. Elementary Modern Japanese II. 100 Units.

Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted. This is the first year of a three-year probram designed to provide students with a thorough grounding in Modern Japanese. Grammar, idiomatic expressions, and vocubulary are learned through oral work, reading, and writing in and out of class. Daily practice in speaking, listening, reading and writing is crucial. Students should plan to continue their language study through at least the second-year level to make their skills practical. The class meets for fove fifty-minute periods a week..

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 10100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 10200

JAPN 31300. Elementary Modern Japanese III. 100 Units.

 This is the first year of a three-year program designed to provide students with a thorough grounding in Modern Japanese. Grammar, idiomatic expressions, and vocabulary are learned through oral work, reading, and writing in and out of class. Daily practice in speaking, listening, reading and writing is crucial. Students should plan to continue their language study through at least the second-year level to make their skills practical. The class meets for five fifty-minute periods a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 10200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 10300

JAPN 32100. Intermediate Modern Japanese I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 10300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 20100

JAPN 32200. Intermediate Modern Japanese II. 100 Units.

The emphasis on spoken language in the first half of the course gradually shifts toward reading and writing in the latter half. The course is conducted mostly in Japanese and meets for five fifty-minute periods a week.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade.
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 20200

JAPN 32300. Intermediate Modern Japanese III. 100 Units.

The emphasis on spoken language in the first half of the course gradually shifts toward reading and writing in the latter half. The course is conducted mostly in Japanese and meets for five fifty-minute periods a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 20300

JAPN 35506. Gender and Japanese History. 100 Units.

This course explores issues of gender within Japanese history from ancient to modern times, with a focus on the period from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries.

Instructor(s): S. Burns     Terms Offered: Spring

JAPN 39000. Introduction to Classical Japanese. 100 Units.

Introduction to the grammar and style of premodern Japanese through a variety of literary texts. Emphasis will be placed on extensive grammatical analysis and translation. Work with original manuscripts will also be introduced as the course progresses. 

Instructor(s): R. Jackson     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Three years modern Japanese or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 19000

JAPN 40500-40600-40700. Fourth-Year Modern Japanese I-II-III.

This course is intended to improve Japanese reading, speaking, writing, and listening ability to the advanced high level as measured by the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Proficiency Guidelines. Weekly assignments require students to tackle modern Japanese texts of varying length and difficulty. Organized around a range of thought-provoking themes (from brain death and organ transplants to Japanese values on work and religion), reading assignments include academic theses in psychology and anthropology, literary texts, and popular journalism. After each reading, students are encouraged to discuss the topic in class. Videos/DVDs are used to improve listening comprehension skills. There are also writing assignments. The class meets for two eighty-minute sessions a week.

JAPN 40500. Fourth-Year Modern Japanese I. 100 Units.

Open to both undergraduates and graduates. This course is designed to improve Japanese reading, speaking, writing and listening ability to the advanced high level as measured by the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Proficiency Guidelines. Weekly assignments will require students to tackle modern Japanese texts of varying length and difficulty. Organized around a range of thought-provoking themes (from brain death and organ transplants to Japanese values on work and religion), reading assignments will include academic theses in psychology and anthropology, literary texts, and popular journalism. After completing the readings, students will be encouraged to discuss each topic in class. Videos/DVDs will be used to improve listening c

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20403, or JAPN 30300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 20500

JAPN 40600. Fourth-Year Modern Japanese II. 100 Units.

Open to both undergraduates and graduates. This course is designed to improve Japanese reading, speaking, writing and listening ability to the advanced high level as measured by the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Proficiency Guidelines. Weekly assignments will require students to tackle modern Japanese texts of varying length and difficulty. Organized around a range of thought-provoking themes (from brain death and organ transplants to Japanese values on work and religion), reading assignments will include academic theses in psychology and anthropology, literary texts, and popular journalism. After completing the readings, students will be encouraged to discuss each topic in class. Videos/DVDs will be used to improve listening comprehension skills. There will also be writing assignments.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20500, or JAPN 40500, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 20600

JAPN 40700. Fourth-Year Modern Japanese III. 100 Units.

PQ: JAPN 40600 or equivalent. Open to both undergraduates and graduates. This course is designed to improve Japanese reading, speaking, writing and listening ability to the advanced high level as measured by the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Proficiency Guidelines. Weekly assignments will require students to tackle modern Japanese texts of varying length and difficulty. Organized around a range of thought-provoking themes (from brain death and organ transplants to Japanese values on work and religion), reading assignments will include academic theses in psychology and anthropology, literary texts, and popular journalism. After completing the readings, students will be encouraged to discuss each topic in class. Videos/DVDs will be used to improve listening comprehension skills. There will also be writing assignments.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20600, or JAPN 40600, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 20700

JAPN 60100. Directed Reading: Advanced Japanese. 100 Units.

This course aims at students who are dealing with challenging Japanese materials for their research.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

East Asian Languages & Civilizations - Korean Courses

KORE 30100-30200-30300. Advanced Korean I-II-III.

This course introduces a wide selection of authentic reading materials from Korean newspaper articles, college-level textbooks, and literary prose as an entry point to discuss topics and issues in Korean society, culture, and history. The primary objective is further enhancement of advanced reading comprehension, composition writing, and presentational skills. In addition, Chinese character (Hanja) lessons are incorporated into each lesson with the purpose of expanding vocabulary to the advanced level. The class meets for two eighty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

KORE 30100. Advanced Korean I. 100 Units.

For graduates and advanced undergraduates. Must be taken for a letter grade. This course introduces readings from a wide selection of written styles including journalistic pieces, college-level textbooks and literary prose. The class focuses on exercises in reading comprehension and discussions on various topics/issues related to contemporary Korea. Some audio and videotapes (e.g., televised news programs, movies, and dramas) will be used in order to improve the students' capacity in advanced Korean. Classes are conducted in Korean and meet for eighty-minute periods two times a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 20401

KORE 30200. Advanced Korean II. 100 Units.

For graduates and advanced undergraduates. Must be taken for a letter grade. This course introduces readings from a wide selection of written styles including journalistic pieces, college-level textbooks and literary prose. The class focuses on exercises in reading comprehension and discussions on various topics/issues related to contemporary Korea. Some audio and videotapes (e.g., televised news programs, movies, and dramas) will be used in order to improve the students' capacity in advanced Korean. Classes are conducted in Korean and meet for eighty-minute periods two times a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20401, or KORE 30100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 20402

KORE 30300. Advanced Korean III. 100 Units.

 For graduates and advanced undergraduates. Must be taken for a letter grade. This course introduces readings from a wide selection of written styles including journalistic pieces, college-level textbooks and literary prose. The class focuses on exercises in reading comprehension and discussions on various topics/issues related to contemporary Korea. Some audio and videotapes (e.g., televised news programs, movies, and dramas) will be used in order to improve the students' capacity in advanced Korean. Classes are conducted in Koran and meet for eighty-minute periods two times a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20402, or KORE 30200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 20403

KORE 41100. Fourth-Year Modern Korean-1. 100 Units.

The first in a series of three consecutive courses focuses on improving speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills to high-advanced level. Through intensive readings and discussions, students will build extensive vocabulary and complex grammatical structures as well as developing sophisticated speaking skills and academic writing skills. The materials introduced in this class include newspaper articles dealing with current social, cultural, or economic issues in Korea, literary works such as poems and novels, and authentic media such as TV documentaries or movies.

Instructor(s): Wonkyung Na     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 21100

KORE 41200. Fourth-Year Modern Korean-2. 100 Units.

The second of three consecutive courses focuses on improving speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills to high-advanced level. Through intensive readings and discussions, students will build extensive vocabulary and complex grammatical structures as well as developing sophisticated speaking skills and academic writing skills. The materials introduced in this class include newspaper articles dealing with current social, cultural, or economic issues in Korea, literary works such as poems and novels, and authentic media such as TV documentaries or movies.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): KORE 41100 or consent
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 21200

KORE 41300. Fourth-Year Modern Korean-3. 100 Units.

The third of three consecutive courses focuses on improving speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills to high-advanced level. Through intensive readings and discussions, students will build extensive vocabulary and complex grammatical structures as well as developing sophisticated speaking skills and academic writing skills. The materials introduced in this class include newspaper articles dealing with current social, cultural, or economic issues in Korea, literary works such as poems and novels, and authentic media such as TV documentaries or movies.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KORE 41200 or consent
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors.
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 21300

KORE 42110. Understanding Contemporary Korean Society through Media. 100 Units.

This content-based language course designed to meet the needs of high-advanced level students of Korean, including international/heritage language students who have studied in Korea up to the primary school levels. There are two main goals for the course. The first objective of the course is to foster speed, accuracy, and comprehension in advanced listening and reading of authentic contemporary texts as well as the refinement of writing skills in various styles. The second objective is for the students to acquire a deeper analytic knowledge of cultural and social issues in contemporary Korea. By examining various articles, TV shows, and films, we are going to discuss contemporary Korean culture, politics and society. The themes that will be dealt with in the class are “The Hell Chosŏn discourse and Korean youth culture” “Pain and Sympathy: South Korean Society after the Sewol Ferry Disaster” and “Korea as Multi-Ethnic Society.” 

Instructor(s): Hyun Hee Park     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 3rd year Korean or consent from instructor

KORE 42200. Contemporary Korean Society and History through Fiction and Film. 100 Units.

This content-based language course is designed to meet the needs of high-advanced level students of Korean, including international/heritage language students who have studied in Korea up to the primary school levels. We analyze cultural and historical issues in contemporary Korea through four contemporary short novels and related film and media. Other goals are to foster fluency, accuracy, and comprehension in reading authentic contemporary texts, as well as advancing language skills for formal presentation, discussion, and writing.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20403 or KORE 30300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 22200

KORE 42300. Changing Identity of Contemporary Korean through Film and Literature. 100 Units.

This content-based language course is designed to meet the needs of high-advanced level students of Korean, including international/heritage language students who have studied in Korea up to the primary school levels. In particular, we deal with how contemporary Korean society can be understood through the diverse perspectives of emergent minority groups. Topics include Korean language and identity, gender and sexuality, and Korea as a multi-ethnic society. Class activities include watching contemporary films featuring minorities in Korea. We also read essays written by minorities (e.g., Korean-Japanese, Russian-Korean) and Korean social activists. Student are encouraged to foster their own views on contemporary social issues through diverse activities of discussion, debate, presentation, and writing.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20403, or KORE 30300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 22300

KORE 53100. Microeconomics and the Korean Economy. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KORE 22100, or KORE 22200, or KORE 22300
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 23100

East Asian Languages & Civilizations Courses

EALC 30421. Japanese Documentary. 100 Units.

This course will examine documentary film in Japan, beginning with its prewar origins and into the present. It will also look at other forms of documentary media, such as photograpy and written reportage. We will pay particular attention to the political and social movements in which these filmmakers and artists participated--from Pacific War-era propaganda to 1960s radicalism. We will also look at theoretical approaches to documentary produced in Japan and elsewhere. What kind of reality does documentary seek to represent? How is this reality constructed--both aesthetically and politically?

Instructor(s): Marianne Tarcov     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 20421

EALC 31800. Introduction to Classical Chinese Poetry. 100 Units.

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of Classical Chinese lyric poetry. The emphasis is on learning how to read poems in the original, but some critical writings in English on Chinese poetry and poetics will also be assigned to provide a context for interpretation.

Instructor(s): Judith Zeitlin     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Good knowledge of Chinese characters/Kanji. Previous quarters of Literary Chinese desirable but can be taken independently with consent of instructor.
Note(s): May be counted as a content course for EALC majors and minors.
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 21800,CHIN 31800

EALC 31801. Introduction to Classical Chinese Poetry. 100 Units.

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of Classical lyric poetry. The emphasis is on learning how to read poems in the original, but some critical writings in English on Chinese poetry and poetics will also be assigned to provide a context for interpretation.

Instructor(s): Judith Zeitlin     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Two quarters of elementary Literary Chinese or consent
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 21801,CHIN 31801

EALC 34213. Contact Zones: Japan's Treaty Ports, 1854–1899. 100 Units.

A series of treaties signed by the Tokugawa shogunate with Western powers in the 1850s designated port towns such as Nagasaki, Yokohama, Hakodate, and Kobe "treaty ports." Semicolonial sites in which Western citizens benefited from rights, such as extraterritoriality, the treaty ports were complicated places that both challenged Japan's sovereignty while also becoming conduits of economic, social, and cultural change. This seminar will explore the evolution of the treaty ports. The main assignment will be an original research paper on a topic of the student's choice.

Instructor(s): S. Burns     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 34213,EALC 24213,GLST 26806,HIST 24213

EALC 34422. Japan and the Japanese: Society, Identity, History. 100 Units.

In this course, we will explore the shifting meanings of the terms “Japan” and “Japanese” focusing primarily on the early modern and modern periods as a way to trace the dynamics of identity formation. Using primary source excerpts from Japanese and foreign official and personal accounts, secondary texts, and visual materials, we will discuss the questions of nationalism, anti-foreignness, exceptionalism, and how the “Japanese” defined themselves against others and within their own society. The critical analysis of various communities, groups, individuals, and ideologies will help us delineate the key factors that shaped society, culture, and politics. Further, the course will train students in analyzing, comparing, and evaluating textual materials and in presenting their ideas orally and in writing. Topics covered: myths, power and status, individualism and collective identity, honor and shame, print culture and information, social networks and outcasts, foreign relations. No Japanese knowledge is required. Open to both BA and MA students.

Instructor(s): Aliz Horvath     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Grad number only open to MAPH or MAPS students, not PhD students.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 24809,EALC 24422

EALC 34500. Reading Qing Documents. 100 Units.

Reading and discussion of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century historical political documents, including such forms as memorials, decrees, local gazetteers, diplomatic communications, essays, and the like.

Instructor(s): G. Alitto     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Third-year Chinese level or approval of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 24500,HIST 34500,HIST 24500

EALC 34622. Mediums and Contexts of Chinese Pictorial Art. 100 Units.

In this course, pictorial representations are approached and interpreted, first and foremost, as concrete, image-bearing objects and architectural structures—as portable scrolls, screens, albums, and fans, as well as murals in Buddhist cave-temples and tombs, and relief carvings on offering shrines and sarcophagi. The lectures and discussion investigate the inherent features of these forms, as well as their histories, viewing conventions, audiences, ritual/social functions, and the roles these forms played in the construction and development of pictorial images.

Instructor(s): Wu Hung     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 34602,EALC 24622,ARTH 24602

EALC 34650. Chinese Pagoda. 100 Units.

More often than not, the Chinese pagoda is considered the most representative of Buddhist architecture in pre-modern China. It is so ubiquitous that many have forgotten the fact that the pagoda actually has a non-Chinese origin; and its vertical building form – rather than the more usual, horizontal sprawl of traditional Chinese architecture – betrays a history that is everything but typical or representative of Chinese Buddhist architecture. Instead of seeing it merely as a building, accordingly, the course will investigate the ways in which the Chinese pagoda was uniquely conceived and constructed as a symbol, artifact, site, structure, space, etc., created to serve specific religious purposes, thereby exerting or evoking specific meanings that engaged both religious and nonreligious ideas and issues in pre-modern China. 

Instructor(s): W. Lin     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 34650,EALC 24650,ARTH 24650

EALC 34950. Fictions of Selfhood in Modern Japanese Literature. 100 Units.

As Japanese leaders in the mid-19th century faced the threat of colonization at the hands of the Western powers, they launched a project to achieve “Civilization and Enlightenment,” quickly transforming Japan into a global power that possessed its own empire. In the process fiction became a site for both political engagement and retreat. A civilized country, it was argued, was supposed to boast “literature” as one of its Fine Arts. This literature was charged with representing the inner life of its characters, doing so in a modern national language that was supposed to be a transparent medium of communication. Between the 1880s and the early 1900s, a new language, new literary techniques, and a new set of ideologies were constructed to produce the “self” in novels and short stories. As soon as these new practices were developed, however, they became the objects of parody and ironic deconstruction. Reading key literary texts from the 1880s through the 1930s, as well as recent scholarship, this course will re-trace this historical and literary unfolding, paying special attention to the relationship between language and subjectivity. All readings will be in English.

Instructor(s): M. Bourdaghs     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Limit: 25
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 24950

EALC 35301. Inventing the Chinese Short Story. 100 Units.

This class will trace the emergence of the vernacular short story as a new genre in the late Ming and early Qing. We will focus on the seveteenth-century story collections of Feng Menglong, Ling Mengchu, Aina Jushi, and Li Yu, whose stories map the social whole of late imperial China—from merchant schemes to courtesan romances, from the friendships of students to the follies of emperors. Alongside close readings of selected stories, we will examine the structure, sources, and publication histories of these collections and locate them in a broader discussion of the meanings and functions of vernacular literature. All readings in English, though students with Chinese reading ability will be encouraged to read the original texts

Instructor(s): Ariel Fox     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): FNDL 25305,EALC 25301

EALC 36515. Literature of the Fantastic and Operatic Adaptation. 100 Units.

This co-taught interdisciplinary course, offered through the Gray Center for Arts and Inquiry, explores literature of the fantastic (here including ghost stories and fairy tales) and the adaptation of such materials into opera, primary “Western-style” opera but also including some examples from Chinese opera. We will read some theoretical essays on adaptation, trans- or re-mediality, and the uncanny, but our focus will be on concrete examples and the historical arc of their transformation (which often entailed at least one intermediary step from story to play on the way to opera). This history, as in the famous case of Turandot, often involves an interesting chain of East-West crossings, misappropriations, and reappropriations; Chinoiserie has been a potent force in the history of Western opera and, in a new form, is currently in vogue again (at least judging from the recent proliferation of Chinese-themed Western-style or fusion operas being created and staged). We will select several specific operas or excerpts from opera as cases, reading their libretti, studying their music, and watching select productions on recorded media.

Instructor(s): J. Zeitlin     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): TAPS 26515,TAPS 36515,MUSI 24618,MUSI 34618,EALC 26515

EALC 37907. Asian Wars of the Twentieth Century. 100 Units.

This course examines the political, economic, social, cultural, racial, and military aspects of the major Asian wars of the twentieth century: the Pacific War, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. At the beginning of the course we pay particular attention to just war doctrines and then use two to three books for each war (along with several films) to examine alternative approaches to understanding the origins of these wars, their conduct, and their consequences.

Instructor(s): B. Cumings     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 27900,EALC 27907,HIST 37900,HIST 27900

EALC 40456. Media, History, East Asia. 100 Units.

This seminar serves as an introduction to theories of media and mediation in the context of scholarship on East Asia. "Media" has come to be a ubiquitous term in how we think not just about technologies of communication and dissemination, but also about literature, music, film, and other forms of cultural production. In this course we will look at how the concept has been taken up in recent work on China, Japan, and Korea, and raise questions about how this work has drawn on media theories from elsewhere; how it has sought to develop or recover locally inflected theories of media; and how it is we might distinguish between the two. Our task, then, will be to consider how media theory and media history have been done, but also to speculate on how they can and should be done within an area studies framework.

Instructor(s): Long     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Grad students only

EALC 40502. Seminar: Modern Chinese History I. 100 Units.

This two-quarter graduate seminar examines the social and cultural history of twentieth-century China from the last decades of the Qing to the death of Mao and the early post-Mao reforms. Topics will include the social, political, and economic transformations from the late-nineteenth to the late-twentieth century, including the rise of modern mass media and mass politics, urban and rural revolutions, the reorganization of everyday life under the Guomindang and Communist regimes, political campaigns under Mao, and the changes taking place after Mao's death. We will pay more attention to changes at the grassroot level of society than to politics at the highest level, even though the latter cannot be entirely ignored. The focus will be on the English-language secondary literature but we will also discuss what published and unpublished sources are available for different periods, how the Chinese archives are structured, and how to read official documents.

Instructor(s): J. Eyferth     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 76003

EALC 40503. Seminar: Modern Chinese History 2. 100 Units.

The winter quarter will be devoted to the preparation of a research paper.

Instructor(s): J. Eyferth     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): HIST 76001
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 76004

EALC 41005. Early Chinese Texts and Sociological Research. 100 Units.

The use of texts for sociological and cultural inquiry. This year the seminar addresses the theoretical and methodological issues arising from popular culture studies, manuscript culture studies, and the "New Philology."

Instructor(s): Donald Harper     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent only

EALC 41451. Palace of Lasting Life: History, Drama, Fantasy. 100 Units.

This course covers the history of Chinese theater from its emergence as a full-fledged art  form in the 10th-11th centuries (the Northern Song) up through its incorporation into modern urban life and nationalist discourse in the first decades of the 20th century (the Republican period). In addition to reading selections from masterpieces of Chinese dramatic literature such as Orphan of Zhao, Romance of the Western Chamber, The Peony Pavilion, we will pay particular attention to the different types of venues, occasions, and performance practices associated with different genres of opera at different moments in time. A central theme will be the changing status of the entertainer and the cultural meanings assigned to acting.  All texts to be read in English translation, but students are also encouraged to read Chinese texts in the original if feasible.

Instructor(s): J. Zeitlin     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Good command of classical Chinese.
Equivalent Course(s): TAPS 41451

EALC 42615. Henri Bergson in Japan. 100 Units.

This seminar will explore the relationship between philosopher Henri Bergson (1859-1941) and a variety of Japanese thinkers and writers from across the twentieth century. We will look at instances of Japanese literature that respond to Bergson (including the fiction of Natsume Soseki), the work of Japanese philosophers who engaged in dialogue with him (for example, Kuki Shuzo), and the way Bergson's translators productively engaged with his ideas as they produced Japanese-language versions of his major works. Advanced Japanese language ability is required. 

Instructor(s): Michael Bourdaghs     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 22615

EALC 44421. Rethinking Natsume Soseki. 100 Units.

With the 2016 centenary of Natsume Sôseki’s death, his "Theory of Literature" and novels have received renewed critical attention, reminding us of his exceptional creativity and prescience. In this seminar, we will read the novels, "Higan sugi made" (To the Spring Equinox and Beyond, 1912), "Kokoro" (Kokoro, 1914), and "Meian" (Light and Dark, 1916) to seek and uncover new ways of reading them, using theoretical insights of recent years from affect theory (including representation of “affect” in realist novels), ethics of reading, queer theory, and world literature approaches. We will be looking closely at how these theoretical insights might cross paths with Sôseki’s own theory as well as Japanese traditional aesthetics on emotions/affect, realism (shaseibun and haiku). Reading ability in Japanese and previous coursework in Japanese literature is helpful but not required. 

Instructor(s): Reiko Abe Auestad     Terms Offered: Autumn

EALC 44802. Coll: Developmt of Mod Chin Hist Field in the West, 1950–2010. 100 Units.

Reading and discussion of classics of historical literature in modern Chinese history from 1950 through the present. Emphasis on how historiographical changes during this period are manifest in each work. Each week students read and discuss the assigned monograph and write a review essay emphasizing its relationship to its historical context. The final requirement is a term paper in which the student constructs an analytical history of the historical literature of the period.

Instructor(s): G. Alitto     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): HIST 44801
Note(s): EALC title needs to be updated to reflect new course title.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 44802

EALC 45025. The Real and the Fake in Early Modern China. 100 Units.

This class explores the late imperial fascination with the boundaries between reality and illusion, genuine and counterfeit, self and role. Focusing on the period from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century—a period marked by both tremendous commercial growth and devastating political turmoil—we will trace the development of a discourse that at once imposes and seeks to overcome these categories of real and fake. In addition to readings from drama, fiction, and poetry, materials will include manuals on forgeries and scams, dream encyclopedias, designs for imaginary gardens, and guidebooks to fantastical realms. All readings available in English, but students with Chinese reading ability will be encouraged to read the original texts.

Instructor(s): Ariel Fox     Terms Offered: Spring

EALC 45401. Western Zhou Bronze Inscriptions. 100 Units.

This seminar is designed to introduce the student to the use of bronze inscriptions in interpreting the history of the Western Zhou dynasty (1045-771 B.C.). While much of the seminar will be spent in attaining the methodological skills necessary to read the inscriptions, historical issues will also be discussed.  These will be determined based on the interests of the students.

Instructor(s): E. Shaughnessy     Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring

EALC 45700. Sources and Methods in the Study of Chinese Buddhism. 100 Units.

A graduate-level introduction to the study of Chinese Buddhism and to the field of Chinese Buddhist studies, mainly as it has been practiced in North America and Europe over the last 50 years.

Instructor(s): P. Copp     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Working ability in literary Chinese helpful but not necessary.
Equivalent Course(s): HREL 45702

EALC 47400. Chinese Art and Agency. 100 Units.

Borrowing Gell’s well-known title, Chinese “Art and Agency” asks if the Gellian framework, or related terms of analysis, is useful and productive for understanding Chinese art. Broadly speaking, this inquiry is to shift of our focus of research from what art looks like to what art does, and to find out what it means in the study of Chinese art history by refocusing ourselves on art’s agency and its agentic power in negotiating between art and people or the world. Students will read theoretic works from anthropology, history of material culture, and literary theory, in addition to studying art historical sources and materials.

Instructor(s): W. Lin     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 47400

EALC 48010. Archaeology of Anyang: Bronzes, Inscriptions, World Heritage. 100 Units.

Anyang is one of the most important archaeological sites in China. The discoveries of inscribed oracle bones, the royal cemetery, clusters of palatial structures, and industrial-scale craft production precincts have all established that the site was indeed the last capital of the Shang dynasty recorded in traditional historiography. With almost continuous excavations since the late 1920s, work at Anyang has in many ways shaped and defined Chinese archaeology and the study of Early Bronze Age China.

Instructor(s): Y. Li     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Open to upper-level undergrads with consent of instructor only.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 28010,ANTH 26765,ANTH 36765

EALC 48209. Unique and Trend-setting Caves at Dunhuang. 100 Units.

This course explores a new way to think about the interrelationship between the 492 Buddhist cave-chapels at Dunhuang. Instead of classifying them into rigid types and arranging them into a given dynastic framework, students are guided to define the moments of invention or borrowing of pictorial and architectural programs, and to reinterpret Buddhist art at the Mogao Grottoes as a complex, continuous process of experimentation, absorption, and popularization. It is hoped that this investigation will lay a methodological basis to envision a new history of Dunhuang caves.

Instructor(s): H. Wu     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Chinese reading proficiency. Consent only.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 48209

EALC 49905. Translation as Madness, Censorship, Queerness: Modern Japanese. 100 Units.

This course will explore multiple facets of translation: as a theoretical lens through which to read and understand poetry, as an important part of the history and development of Japanese poetry and poetics, and as a form of critical and creative practice for students. We will combine readings of modern Japanese poetry in translation with readings of translation theory in order to understand poetry as itself a translational mode.  Throughout, we will explore the ethical and political valences of translation as a mode of expression for those on the margins of society, of language, or of the global literary canon. This involves defining translation, not only as an analytical lens for reading poetry, but also as an element of the lived experiences of many modern Japanese poets who lived and worked between cultures and languages. Translation will also offer us a way to consider the relationship of these poets to global Modernism. What is the relationship between translated poetry and “original work,” especially in the Japanese context, where many writers worked on the border between them? How do these poets trouble conventional notions of originality? What do these poets reveal about poetry as a kind of translation—and translation as a kind of poetry? Undergraduates may take this course with permission. Reading ability in Japanese though encouraged is not required.

Instructor(s): M. Tarcov     Terms Offered: Autumn

EALC 50001. Landscape and Room in Chinese Literature and Film. 100 Units.

In this course we will study seminal theoretical works on landscape, location, and place in literature and film along with Chinese literary works and films in which the environment or setting plays an especially important role. Questions will include: What does landscape mean, and how? When and why do filmmakers opt for shooting in an outside location, and in which cases do they prefer the more controllable space of a room? Can a room be written about as if it were a landscape? Is the sky part of the landscape? How about the wind? Why or why not?  Readings will be in Chinese and English.

Instructor(s): P. Iovene     Terms Offered: Spring

EALC 50002. Problems in Contemporary Chinese Literary Studies. 100 Units.

In this graduate seminar we will discuss key texts and approaches to the literature of mainland China from the early 1940s onwards. Our focus will be on the ways concepts of literature and literary history have been redefined, and on the political, social, and media contexts that have shaped this process. Our overall aim is to clarify what are the main "problems" calling for further investigation today.   Readings will be in Chinese and English.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Knowledge of Modern Chinese

EALC 50100. Chinese Religious Manuscripts and Epigraphy. 100 Units.

An introduction to reading and working with Chinese religious manuscripts and stone inscriptions. Though we will read and discuss basic secondary works in paleography, codicology, and epigraphy, most of our time will be spent developing our own skills in these disciplines, including in trips to the Field Museum to examine their extensive collection of rubbings and inscribed Buddhist and Daoist statuary. 

Instructor(s): P. Copp     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Knowledge of literary Chinese required.
Equivalent Course(s): HREL 50104

EALC 51010. Archaeology of Bronze Age China Advanced Seminar. 100 Units.

“Bronze Age” in China conventionally refers to the time period from ca. 2000 to about 500 BC, during which bronze, an alloy of copper and other metals such as tin and lead, was the predominant medium used by the society, or to be more precise, the elite classes of the society. Bronze objects, in the forms of vessels, weapons, and musical instruments, were reserved for the upper ruling class of the society and were used mostly as paraphernalia during rituals and feasting. “Bronze Age” in China also indicates the emergence and eventual maturation of states with their bureaucratic systems, the presence of urban centers, a sophisticated writing system, and advanced craft producing industries, especially metal production.  This course surveys the important archaeological finds of Bronze Age China, and the theoretical issues such as state formation, craft production, writing, bureaucratic systems, urbanization, warfare, and inter-regional interaction, etc.  It emphasizes a multi-disciplinary approach with readings and examples from anthropology, archaeology, art history, and epigraphy. This course will also visit the Smart Museum, the Field Museum, and the Art Institute of Chicago to take advantage of the local collections of ancient Chinese arts and archaeology.

Instructor(s): Y. Li     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 56115

EALC 52300. Sem: Japanese Hist 1. 100 Units.

Reading and research in Japanese history, which culminates in a major seminar paper at the end of winter term.

Instructor(s): J. Ketelaar     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Graduate students only
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 76601

EALC 52301. Sem: Japanese Hist 2. 100 Units.

In the second quarter we focus on research topics for students writing the seminar paper.

Instructor(s): J. Ketelaar     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): HIST 76601
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 76602

EALC 56605. Colloquium: Chinese Nationalism(s) 100 Units.

An exploration of the development, spread, and nature of Chinese nationalism since roughly 1895, but with attention to how legacies from the imperial period have shaped these phenomena. (Those legacies include the borders and ethnic complexity inherited from the Qing by modern state-builders, as well as the still older legacies of a common written language and literary culture, elements of a common religious system, and a variety of labels for "Chineseness"—Hua, Han, etc.—with which people identified to varying degrees.) Attention will be paid both to state leaders' attempts to create and mobilize nationalist sentiment and to various movements and practices originating elsewhere in society. Comparisons to nationalisms elsewhere, and general theories of nationalism, are not the main foci of the course, but will be invoked where they seem useful. Required readings will be in English, with recommendations available for material in Chinese. One short paper (5–7 pages) on one of a set of given topics; one longer paper (approximately 15 pages), with individualized topics; and one or two additional very short projects (1–2 pages each).

Instructor(s): K. Pomeranz     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 56605

EALC 56705. Colloquium: Modern Korean History 1. 100 Units.

By modern, we mean Korea since its "opening" in 1876. We read about one book per week in the autumn. Before each session, one student will write a three- to four-page paper on the reading, with another student commenting on it. In the winter, students present the subject, method, and rationale for a research paper. Papers should be about forty pages and based in primary materials; ideally this means Korean materials, but ability to read scholarly materials in Korean, Japanese, or Chinese is not a requirement for taking the colloquium. Students may also choose a comparative and theoretical approach, examining some problems in modern Korean history in the light of similar problems elsewhere, or through the vision of a body of theory.

Instructor(s): B. Cumings     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Open to upper-level undergraduates with consent.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 56705

EALC 56706. Colloquium: Modern Korean History 2. 100 Units.

Students present the subject, method, and rationale for a research paper. Papers should be about forty pages and based in primary materials; ideally this means Korean materials, but ability to read scholarly materials in Korean, Japanese, or Chinese is not a requirement for taking the colloquium. Students may also choose a comparative and theoretical approach, examining some problems in modern Korean history in the light of similar problems elsewhere, or through the vision of a body of theory.

Instructor(s): B. Cumings     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): HIST 56705; open to upper-level undergraduates with consent.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 56706

EALC 56901. The Films of Ozu Yasujiro. 100 Units.

This course explores Ozu Yasujiro's works from both national and transnational perspectives. Through an intense examination of Ozu's robust filmmaking career, from the student comedies of the late 1920s to the family drama (in Agfacolor) of the early 1960s, we will locate Ozu's works at a dialogic focal point of Japanese, East Asian, American, and European cinema.

Instructor(s): T. Tsunoda     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): CMST 66901

EALC 58011. Archaeology of Craft Production: Theories and Case Studies. 100 Units.

The course will review anthropological literature and case studies of craft production and craft specialization in ancient civilizations. It also takes a multi-disciplinary approach by adopting perspectives developed in history and art history. Topics discussed in the course include organization of production, craft production and the elite, chaîne opératoire, status and identity of artisans, and political economy and craft production. Students are expected to become familiar with prevalent theoretical discussions and are encouraged to apply, adopt, or revise them in order to analyze examples of craft production of their own choice.

Instructor(s): Y. Li     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Open to undergraduates with consent.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 58011

EALC 59700. Thesis Research. 100 Units.

For course description contact East Asian Languages.

EALC 60000. Reading Course. 100 Units.

No description available.

EALC 65000. Directed Translation. 100 Units.

For course description contact East Asian Languages.

EALC 70000. Advanced Study: East Asian. Units.

For course description contact East Asian Languages.