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Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations

Department Website: http://ealc.uchicago.edu

Chair

  • Hoyt Long

Director of Graduate Studies

  • Ed Shaughnessy

Director of Undergraduate Studies

  • Paul Copp

Professors

  • Michael K. Bourdaghs
  • Donald Harper
  • James Ketelaar (also with History)
  • Haun Saussy (also with Comparative Literature)
  • Edward L. Shaughnessy
  • Hung Wu (also with Art History)
  • Judith Zeitlin

Associate Professors

  • Guy S. Alitto (also with History)
  • Susan Burns (also with History)
  • Paul Copp
  • Kyeong Hee Choi
  • Jacob Eyferth (also with History)
  • Paola Iovene
  • Yung-ti Li
  • Hoyt Long

Assistant Professors

  • Ariel Fox

Senior Lecturers

  • Harumi Lory
  • Ji Eun Kim
  • Youqin Wang
  • Jun Yang

Instructional Professors

  • Satoko Ogura Bourdaghs
  • Yoko Katagiri
  • Yi-Lu Kuo
  • Meng Li
  • Misa Miyachi
  • Wonkyung Na
  • Laura Skosey
  • Xaiorong Wang
  • Shan Xiang

Lecturers

  • Satoko Ogura
  • Laura Skosey
  • Yujia Ye

Emeritus Faculty

  • George Chih Chao 
  • Norma Field
  • Tetsuo Najita, History

Program Description

The Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations is a multidisciplinary department, with faculty specialists in history, art, philosophy, languages, linguistics, literature, and religions, that offers a program of advanced study of the traditional and modern cultures of China, Japan, and Korea. At the same time, students are encouraged to pursue their interests across traditional disciplinary lines by taking courses in other departments in the Divisions of the Social Sciences and the Humanities.

The Department admits applicants only for the Ph.D. degree, and does not offer a terminal M.A. program. Students who arrive with a master's degree will be expected to fulfill the 18-course requirement. Students interested in a terminal M.A. degree should contact the University of Chicago Master of Arts Program in the Humanities or the Master of Arts Program in Social Sciences.

Students admitted to doctoral study in Summer 2020 and after will be guaranteed to have funding support from the University of Chicago, external sources, or a combination of the two for the duration of their program.  This includes full tuition coverage, annual stipend, and fully paid individual annual premiums for UChicago’s student health insurance. More information about the financial aid for Humanities students can be found here.  Students are expected to remain in good academic standing.

Pedagogical training is a vital component of the educational experience at the University. Pedagogical training plans vary by department but are inclusive of the expectation that students will receive mentorship as course assistants and have the opportunity to teach their own stand-alone course.

During the first two years, students take nine courses each year. Depending on students' interests and preparation, some of the coursework may take place outside the Department. It may also include work in language, either the primary language of study or a secondary one, whether East Asian or not, as well as in a second East Asian civilization. Many students may also wish to spend one or more years in Japan, China, Taiwan, or Korea to achieve language mastery or do research for their dissertation. Teaching opportunities for students are also available.

After the Ph.D. qualifying exam, which consists of both an oral and written component, acceptance of a dissertation proposal admits a student to candidacy. Students are expected to write and defend dissertations that make original contributions to knowledge. The degree is conferred upon the successful defense of the completed dissertation.

Contact

Dawn Brennan, Department Administrator

Wieboldt Hall, Room 301-E

1050 East 58th Street

Chicago, IL 60637

Phone: 773.702.1255

ealc@uchicago.edu

Website: ealc.uchicago.edu 

Information on How to Apply

The application process for admission and financial aid for all graduate programs in Humanities is administered through the divisional Office of the Dean of Students. The application for Admission and Financial Aid, with instructions, deadlines, and department specific information is available online at: http://humanities.uchicago.edu/students/admissions.

Questions pertaining to admissions and aid should be directed to humanitiesadmissions@uchicago.edu or (773) 702-1552.

International students must provide evidence of English proficiency by submitting scores from either the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). Current minimum scores, etc., are provided with the application. For more information, please see the Office of International Affairs website at https://internationalaffairs.uchicago.edu, or call them at (773) 702-7752.

For additional information about the East Asian Languages and Civilizations program, please see http://ealc.uchicago.edu or call (773) 702-1255.

Program Requirements

The requirements are filled in three stages: Masters Degree Requirements (for students entering with or without an M.A. in East Asian Studies), Ph.D. Candidacy Requirements, and Ph.D. Degree Requirements.

Master's Degree Requirements

  1. Complete eighteen courses
    1. One course should be EALC 65000 Directed Translation, although the translation requirement can be met in other ways.
    2. No more than two courses taken for an "R" or "P" grade
    3. Two non-specialization East Asian courses
  2. No outstanding Incompletes
  3. Courses or Placement at the third year level of one East Asian Language.
  4. One M.A. thesis or two M.A. papers

Ph.D. Candidacy Requirements

  1. Second East Asian Language
  2. Mastery of Languages required for primary research
  3. Proficiency in any additional languages required for research
  4. Pass PhD Qualifying Exams
  5. Defense and approval of Dissertation Proposal

Once the student has passed the dissertation proposal defense, the Department will certify that the student has met all the requirements for Admission to Candidacy (all requirements for degree with the exception of the dissertation). The Department will submit paperwork to the Office of the Dean of Students that recommends that the student be admitted to candidacy for the PhD degree.

Ph.D. Degree Requirements

  1. Admission to Ph.D. Candidacy
  2. Approval and Defense  of the Dissertation

Joint Ph.D. Program in East Asian Cinema

The Program in Cinema and Media Studies and the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations have formed a joint Ph.D. program in East Asian cinema at the University of Chicago. The University has long-standing engagement with both Film and East Asian studies and has already graduated a number of scholars who are changing the field of East Asian cinema around the world. The purpose of this degree program is to provide the best possible training in the methods, languages, and cultural contexts needed to undertake original research on specific topics in East Asian cinema and media studies.  Students interested in following this course of study will first apply directly to either the Program in Cinema and Media Studies or to the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations.

You can see up-to-date course listings at our website, ealc.uchicago.edu, or on the registrar's Times Schedules at https://coursesearch92.ais.uchicago.edu/psc/prd92guest/EMPLOYEE/HRMS/c/UC_STUDENT_RECORDS_FL.UC_CLASS_SEARCH_FL.GBL.

EALC COURSES

EALC 33970. Histories of Chinese Dance. 100 Units.

This class is an introduction to the forms, practices, and meanings of dance in China and the diaspora from ancient times to the present day. Through readings, videos, class demonstrations, and performances, we will explore the reconstruction of court dance in early China; Central Asian dance and dancers in the medieval imagination; the development of operatic movement in the late imperial period; the introduction and transformation of concert dance in the first half of the 20th century; socialist dance and the model ballets of the Cultural Revolution; folk dance and PRC ethno-nationalist discourse; the post-reform transnational avant-garde; ballroom dancing and everyday urban street life; Han revivalism, Shen Yun, and "classical Chinese dance" in the 21st century. Across these varied materials we will ask: what do we mean when we speak of dance, and what makes a dance Chinese? All materials in English; no background required.

Instructor(s): A. Fox     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): TAPS 26270, TAPS 36270, EALC 23970

EALC 34513. Documentary Chinese. 100 Units.

This course guides students through critical readings of primary historical documents from approximately 1800 through 1950. These documents are translated sentence by sentence, and then historiographically analyzed. Most of these documents are from the nineteenth century. Genres include public imperial edicts, secret imperial edicts, secret memorials to the throne from officials, official reports to superiors and from superiors, funereal essays, depositions ("confessions"), local gazetteers (fangzhi), newspapers, and periodicals. To provide an introduction to these genres, the first six weeks of the course will use the Fairbank and Kuhn textbook "The Rebellion of Chung Jen-chieh" (Harvard-Yanjing Institute). The textbook provides ten different genres of document with vocabulary glosses and grammatical explanations; all documents relate to an 1841-42 rebellion in Hubei province. Assignments: Each week prior to class students electronically submit a written translation of the document or documents to be read; a day after the class they electronically submit a corrected translation of the document or documents read. A fifteen-page term paper based on original sources in documentary Chinese is also required.

Instructor(s): G. Alitto     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): A reading knowledge of modern (baihua) Chinese and some familiarity with classical Chinese (wenyan) or Japanese Kanbun. Other students may take the course with permission from the instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 24513, HIST 34513, EALC 24513

EALC 34950. Fictions of Selfhood in Modern Japanes Literature. 100 Units.

As Japanese leaders in the mid-19th century faced the threat of colonization at the hands of the Western powers, they launched a project to achieve "Civilization and Enlightenment," quickly transforming Japan into a global power that possessed its own empire. In the process fiction became a site for both political engagement and retreat. A civilized country, it was argued, was supposed to boast "literature" as one of its Fine Arts. This literature was charged with representing the inner life of its characters, doing so in a modern national language that was supposed to be a transparent medium of communication. Between the 1880s and the early 1900s, a new language, new literary techniques, and a new set of ideologies were constructed to produce the "self" in novels and short stories. As soon as these new practices were developed, however, they became the objects of parody and ironic deconstruction. Reading key literary texts from the 1880s through the 1930s, as well as recent scholarship, this course will re-trace this historical and literary unfolding, paying special attention to the relationship between language and subjectivity. All readings will be in English.

Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 24950

EALC 37014. Voices from the Iron House: Lu Xun's Works. 100 Units.

An exploration of the writings of Lu Xun (1881-1936), widely considered the greatest Chinese writer of the past century. We will read short stories, essays, prose poetry, and personal letters against the backdrop of the political and cultural upheavals of early 20th century China and in dialogue with important English-language scholarly works.

Instructor(s): P. Iovene     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 27014, CMLT 27014, FNDL 21907

EALC 38400. Modern Chinese Literature: Communities, Media & Selves. 100 Units.

In this in-depth introduction to modern Chinese literature we will combine close readings of texts with a survey of the ideas, media, and institutions that shaped literary practices from the 1900s to the 1930s. We will discuss authors, literary circles and associations, journals and publishers, as well as notions of self, language, and community. In doing so, we will pursue the following questions: What is a modern Chinese literary text, and what are its relevant contexts? How to connect literary writing-per se a highly individualized and largely solitary activity-with the forms of sociality and the collaborative practices in which it is embedded? How did various communities and institutions affect, and how were they affected by, the writing and reading of literature? Our focus will be on the ways in which authors and groups redefined the function of literature in times of upheaval, the transformations in language and media that shaped their efforts, and the ways in which they conceived of and sought to reach out to readers. Our explorations will be both historical and historiographical, and will touch on the main debates in modern Chinese literary studies today.

Instructor(s): P. Iovene     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 28400

EALC 39527. The Spatial History of Nineteenth-Century Cities: Tokyo, London, New York. 100 Units.

The late nineteenth century saw the transformation of cities around the world as a result of urbanization, industrialization, migration, and the rise of public health. This course will take a spatial history approach; that is, we will explore the transformation of London, Tokyo, and New York over the course of the nineteenth century by focusing on the material "space" of the city. For example, where did new immigrants settle and why? Why were there higher rates of infectious disease in some areas than in others? How did new forms of public transportation shape the ability to move around the city, rendering some areas more central than others? To explore questions such as these, students will be introduced to ArcGIS in four lab sessions and asked to develop an original research project that integrates maps produced in Arc. No prior ArcGIS experience is necessary, although students will be expected to have familiarity with Microsoft Excel and a willingness to experiment with digital methods.

Instructor(s): S. Burns
Note(s): Assignment: long paper
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 29527, ENST 29527, GLST 29527, HIST 39527, EALC 29527

EALC 40651. Amateur Creativity in Modern China. 100 Units.

The ideal of the amateur author has repeatedly been invoked in different moments and for different purposes throughout the history of modern China. Non-professional writers have often been considered more "authentic"- their perceptions less hindered by conventions and more sensitive to the details of everyday life. In the socialist world, amateur writing and art was one of the strategies to contrast the division between mental and manual labor. And today, we assist to a veritable explosion made possible by digital media which fully reveals the inherent contradictions of amateur creativity. Seen by many as a means to escape oppressive labor regimes, it ends up being the most commodified form of labor of our times. This class will proceed through a series of case studies to understand the valorization of amateurism in modern Chinese culture in historical and comparative perspective. Special attention will be paid to the media environments that make it possible, and to the ways amateur writing and art depict labor. Our overall goal, in sum, will be to familiarize ourselves with some of the ways in which the relation between creativity, amateurism, and labor has been represented and theorized.

Instructor(s): P. Iovene     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CMST 40651

EALC 40800. Advanced Readings in Literary Chinese I. 100 Units.

Selected readings in pre-modern Chinese literature from the first millennium B.C.E. to the end of the imperial period. The course covers important works in topics ranging from philosophy, history and religion to poetry, fiction and drama. Specific content varies by instructor.

Instructor(s): L. Skosey     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Course may be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Undergraduate enrollment is encouraged. CHIN 21000, or placement, or consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 40800

EALC 40899. Opera without Borders. 100 Units.

Opera without Borders" explores how markers of race, indigeneity, and other identities blur historical time and disrupt geopolitical space on the operatic stage. How does opera operate in the new arenas of cosmopolitan citizenship during our present historical moment, when the unitary monoliths of nations, citizens, and identities are no longer firmly in place and means of travel and communication are quickly transforming? How and why have patterns of exploration, trade, and migration, forced and voluntary, colonial and decolonial, generated new operatic genres, new means of operatic production, and new kinds of opera producers (librettists, composers, directors, choreographers, dramaturgs, etc.)?  Among our cases are the Royal Shakespeare Company's Orphan of Zhao (2012); the Paris Opera's hiphop staging of Rameau's Les indes galantes (2019); Schikaneder and Mozart's Magic Flute (1791) reimagined as Impempe Yomlingo (2007-2011) by the township artists of Capetown; and circulations of Cantonese opera in Chinatowns from Vancouver and San Francisco to New York and Honolulu.

Instructor(s): Martha Feldman and Judith Zeitlin     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Enrollment Limit: 18; Weekly screenings required; Advanced undergraduates may request permission to enroll
Equivalent Course(s): TAPS 40899, CDIN 40899, GNSE 40899, MUSI 44022

EALC 40900. Advanced Readings in Literary Chinese-II. 100 Units.

Selected readings in pre-modern Chinese literature from the first millennium B.C.E. to the end of the imperial period. The course covers important works in topics ranging from philosophy, history and religion to poetry, fiction and drama. Specific content varies by instructor. This quarter we will read classics of the "ancient prose" movement in the late Tang and early Song periods.

Instructor(s): Haun Saussy     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Course may be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Undergraduate enrollment is encouraged. CHIN 40800, or CHIN 21000, or placement, or consent of instructor.
Note(s): Not offered every year; quarters vary.
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 40900

EALC 41000. Advanced Readings in Literary Chinese III. 100 Units.

The course will cover a selection of works in _biji_ (notation) and _zaji_ (random note) form from the Song to Qing dynasties. Part of the interest of the form is its inclusiveness, which has made it hard to place on maps of genre. These works include scientific investigation, social commentary, travel accounts, classical interpretation, personal reminiscences, tales and gossip, art appreciation, responses to poetry, and many other things, combined in an apparently associative manner. We will read both for topical interest and for understanding of the form.

Instructor(s): Judith Zeitlin     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Course may be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Undergraduate enrollment is encouraged. CHIN 40900, or CHIN 21000, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Not offered every year; quarters vary.
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 41000

EALC 41005. Early Chinese Texts and Sociological Research. 100 Units.

The use of texts for sociological and cultural inquiry. This year the seminar addresses the theoretical and methodological issues arising from popular culture studies, manuscript culture studies, and the "New Philology."

Instructor(s): Donald Harper     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent only

EALC 41102. Reading Archival Documents from the People's Republic of China. 100 Units.

This hands-on reading and research course aims to give graduate students the linguistic skills needed to locate, read, and analyze archival documents from the People's Republic of China. We will begin by discussing the functions and structure of Chinese archives at the central, provincial, and county level. Next we will read and translate sample documents drawn from different archives. These may include police reports, personnel files, internal memos, minutes of meetings, etc. Our aim here is to understand the conventions of a highly standardized communication system - for example, how does a report or petition from an inferior to a superior office differ from a top-down directive or circular, or from a lateral communication between adminstrations of equal rank? We will also read "sub-archival" documents, i.e. texts that are of interest to the historian but did not make it into state archives, such as letters, diaries, contracts, and private notebooks. The texts we will read are selected to cast light on the everyday life of "ordinary" people in the Maoist period. The target group for the course are graduate students and advanced undergraduates with good Chinese reading skills.

Instructor(s): J. Eyferth     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): advanced Chinese reading skills
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 41102

EALC 41192. Annals In Ancient China. 100 Units.

Annalistic records kept at the courts of the various states of ancient China were among the earliest writing in China, and certainly serve as the beginning of China's long historiographical tradition. In this course, we will first examine the Chunqiu or Spring and Autumn Annals, long since enshrined as oine of the Five Classics, by way of understanding the nature of annals. Then we will move on to examine in detail the Zhushu jinian or Bamboo Annals, discovered in 279 A.D. an ancient tomb located in what is present-day Jixian, Henan. The Bamboo Annals introduced major changes in the understanding of ancient Chinese history during the Six Dynasties through Tang period, but then came to be suspected of being a forgery. We will consider both to what extent these suspicions are valid, and also what the Bamboo Annals can reveal to us regarding ancient history.

Instructor(s): E. Shaughnessy     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: Ability ot read classical Chinese

EALC 41450. Peach Blossom Fan: Theater, History, and Politics. 100 Units.

This seminar probes the interplay of history, politics, and theatricality in Kong Shangren's Peach Blossom Fan, his dramatic masterpiece of 1699, which brilliantly depicts the fall of the Ming dynasty in 1644-1645 on multiple social, cultural, and ritual fronts, from the pleasure quarters and the imperial court to the Confucian Temple and the battlefield. Issues to be addressed include: the representation and reassessment of late Ming entertainment culture--courtesans, actors, storytellers, musicians, booksellers, painters; metatheatricality; memory and commemoration; props and material culture; the dissemination of news and (mis)information; the reenactment of the past on the stage, as we contextualize Peach Blossom Fan within the early Qing literary and theatrical world in which it was created and performed. We'll also examine the interplay of history, politics, and theatricality in the modern reception of the play by analyzing its modern and contemporary incarnations in spoken drama, feature film, and different operatic genres.

Instructor(s): J. Zeitlin     Terms Offered: Winter `
Note(s): Reading knowledge of modern and classical Chinese is desirable but not required. The course is open to MAPH students as well as Phd students.
Equivalent Course(s): TAPS 41450

EALC 44219. Remembrances of Things Past: Japanese Classics in Modern Literature. 100 Units.

In this course we will read premodern Japanese literature and performance alongside modern works of page, stage, and film by Higuchi Ichiyo, Tanizaki Jun'ichiro, Enchi Fumiko, Mishima Yukio, Oba Minako, and others, which engage with these classical texts either thematically or formally. We will pay special attention to internal and external dynamics of recollection, evocation, alienation and inheritance, to shifting perceptions of orality in literature, and to explorations of alternative realities and possibilities in the remembrance (and misremembrance) of classical literature and performance.

Instructor(s): M. Van Wyk     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Readings will be available in English, but those with knowledge of modern Japanese will be strongly encouraged to read in Japanese where possible. Prior knowledge of Classical Japanese is not required. Advanced undergraduates interested in joining must receive prior approval by emailing instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): TAPS 44219

EALC 44420. Fascisms and Japanese Culture. 100 Units.

This course will explore multiple definitions of fascism in relation to modern Japanese culture. We will read works of literature and literary criticism typically identified as fascist, as well as Japanese critiques of fascism, from the 1930s and beyond. We will also read a number of theoretical texts from Japan and elsewhere that analyze fascism as a political and cultural form. There will be two reading tracks, one for students who can read Japanese and one all in English.

Instructor(s): Bourdaghs     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Advanced Japanese
Note(s): Grad students only

EALC 44450. Sound in Japanese Literature. 100 Units.

This course engages with the various uses of sound in Japanese literary texts, ranging from the late Edo period through the contemporary era. We will also read recent sound-oriented approaches to literary and cultural studies in both Japan and Anglo-American criticism. Readings will be in both English and Japanese.

Instructor(s): M. Bourdaghs     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Japanese reading ability

EALC 44821. Platforming Culture in East Asia: From Newspapers to Web 2.0. 100 Units.

How has the digital revolution changed the way that creative works, especially literature, are produced and consumed in contemporary East Asia? How has the growth of regional and global online platforms altered the field of cultural production? What do all of these changes mean for the study of culture itself? This seminar takes up these questions in the course of surveying recent theoretical and empirical work on social media platforms, the digital revolution in publishing, and user-generated content. We will survey some of the recent forms that the platformization of culture has taken in East Asia, including internet literature in China, Japanese cellphone novels, and Korean webtoons, putting all of these into comparative perspective with developments elsewhere. We will also look to specific historical forms of platformization in literary culture (e.g., newspaper serialization, mass-market anthologies) to reflect on what is distinct about the platforming of creativity in the digital age.

Instructor(s): Hoyt Long     Terms Offered: Spring

EALC 44822. Platforming Culture in East Asia: From Newspapers to Web 2.0. 100 Units.

How has the digital revolution changed the way that creative works, especially literature, are produced and consumed in contemporary East Asia? How has the growth of regional and global online platforms altered the field of cultural production? What do all of these changes mean for the study of culture itself? This seminar takes up these questions in the course of surveying recent theoretical and empirical work on social media platforms, the digital revolution in publishing, and user-generated content. We will survey some of the recent forms that the platformization of culture has taken in East Asia, including internet literature in China, Japanese cellphone novels, and Korean webtoons, putting all of these into comparative perspective with developments elsewhere. We will also look to specific historical forms of platformization in literary culture (e.g., newspaper serialization, mass-market anthologies) to reflect on what is distinct about the platforming of creativity in the digital age

Instructor(s): H. Long     Terms Offered: Spring

EALC 45025. The Real and the Fake in Early Modern China. 100 Units.

This class explores the late imperial fascination with the boundaries between reality and illusion, genuine and counterfeit, self and role. Focusing on the period from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century-a period marked by both tremendous commercial growth and devastating political turmoil-we will trace the development of a discourse that at once imposes and seeks to overcome these categories of real and fake. In addition to readings from drama, fiction, and poetry, materials will include manuals on forgeries and scams, dream encyclopedias, designs for imaginary gardens, and guidebooks to fantastical realms. All readings available in English, but students with Chinese reading ability will be encouraged to read the original texts.

Instructor(s): Ariel Fox     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Open to undergraduates with instructor permission.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 25025

EALC 45401. Eastern Zhou Bronze Inscriptions/Seminar. 100 Units.

This course will provide an overview of Chinese unearthed documents of the Eastern Zhou dynasty, including both bronze and stone inscriptions and also bamboo and silk manuscripts . By reading selections from these materials, we will seek to gain a general sense of both how they were produced and used at the time and also how their modern study has evolved.

Instructor(s): E. Shaughnessy     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Proficiency in Literary Chinese.
Note(s): Open to undergraduates with consent. This course is a continuation of EALC 45400, although 45400 is not a prerequisite of EALC 45401.

EALC 47111. Culture Fever: Chinese Literature in the 1980s. 100 Units.

The Chinese 1980s are now remembered as a highly creative period in literature and arts, and as a time of diverse political aspirations that culminated in the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989. Many debates and experiments throughout the decade revolved around the notion of "culture." What did this term mean in 1980s China, why was it considered important, and how to situate its meanings historically, both in relation to the Mao Era and to the changes that came after 1989? These are some of the questions we will address in this course, which will examine a variety of texts including poetry, fiction, interviews, diaries, and documentaries from and about the cultures of an exciting time.

Instructor(s): P. Iovene     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Texts will be in Chinese and English.

EALC 48010. Archaeology of Anyang: Bronzes, Inscriptions, and World Heritage. 100 Units.

Anyang is one of the most important archaeological sites in China. The discoveries of inscribed oracle bones, the royal cemetery, clusters of palatial structures, and industrial-scale craft production precincts have all established that the site was indeed the last capital of the Shang dynasty recorded in traditional historiography. With almost continuous excavations since the late 1920s, work at Anyang has in many ways shaped and defined Chinese archaeology and the study of Early Bronze Age China. This course intends to examine the history of research, important archaeological finds, and the role of Anyang studies in the field of Chinese archaeology. While the emphasis is on archaeological finds and the related research, this course will also attempt to define Anyang in the modern social and cultural contexts in terms of world heritage, national and local identity, and the looting and illegal trade of antiquities.

Instructor(s): Y. Li     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Open to undergraduates with consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 36765, ANTH 26765, EALC 28010

EALC 48080. Medical Knowledge in Early Modern Japan and China: History/Literature. 100 Units.

This experimental seminar examines how medical knowledge is constituted and disseminated in texts, images, and performances in early modern Japan and China (roughly 1600-1850). This period saw an explosion in the number of doctors, print and visual materials, and a new centrality of medical, pharmacological, and bodily knowledge and practices. Looking beyond established national, cultural, and political boundaries, we will study how shared medical traditions converge and diverge over time and space. How did literary genre shape and constrain the forms medical knowledge took and vice-versa? Who has access to and who has control over technologies of health and sickness, including learned medicine, vernacular healing, and self-care? How was efficacy understood, contested, and proven in a medical and legal context? Primary sources to be read include medical and crime cases, forensic reports, plays, novels, biographies, imperial encyclopedias, almanacs for daily life, illustrated pharmacopeia, religious tracts, printed advertisements, and shops signs. Film and tv episodes will be screened to explore contemporary narratives of early modern medical knowledge in the very different political and media economies of post-war China and Japan.

Instructor(s): Judith Zeitlin and Susan Burns     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent required for graduate students and advance undergraduates.
Equivalent Course(s): KNOW 48080, CDIN 48080, HIST 44601

EALC 58011. Archaeology of Craft Production: Theories and Case Studies. 100 Units.

The course will review anthropological literature and case studies of craft production and craft specialization in ancient civilizations. It also takes a multi-disciplinary approach by adopting perspectives developed in history and art history. Topics discussed in the course include organization of production, craft production and the elite, chaîne opératoire, status and identity of artisans, and political economy and craft production. Students are expected to become familiar with prevalent theoretical discussions and are encouraged to apply, adopt, or revise them in order to analyze examples of craft production of their own choice.

Instructor(s): Y. Li     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Undergrads upper division only with permission from instructor
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 58011

EALC 59700. Thesis Research. 100 Units.

For course description contact East Asian Languages.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor

EALC 60000. Reading Course. 100 Units.

Independent reading course

Terms Offered: Autumn Spring Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor

EALC 60201. EALC Proseminar: Applying for Grants and Jobs. 100 Units.

This class will help graduate students prepare for a range of applications, including dissertation research and writing fellowships, stand-alone class proposals, postdocs, and academic jobs. In a workshop-style setting, we will cover written application materials (cover letters, research proposals, CVs, writing samples, teaching and diversity statements, sample syllabi) and practice for virtual and in-person interviews, conference presentations, and job talks. This course is open to EALC graduate students at any point in the program.

Instructor(s): A. Fox     Terms Offered: Spring

EALC 65000. Directed Translation. 100 Units.

Fulfills translation requirement for EALC graduate students. Must be arranged with individual faculty member. Register by section with EALC faculty.

Terms Offered: Autumn Spring Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor

CHINESE COURSES

CHIN 10100-10200-10300. Elementary Modern Chinese I-II-III.

This three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese. By the end of Spring Quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. In Spring Quarter, students are required to submit a video project for the Chinese Video Project Award. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week. A drill session with the TA is held one hour a week in addition to scheduled class time. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted. Two sections.

CHIN 10100. Elementary Modern Chinese I. 100 Units.

This three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese. By the end of Spring Quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. In Spring Quarter, students are required to submit a video project for the Chinese Video Project Award. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week. A drill session with the TA is held one hour a week in addition to scheduled class time. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn

CHIN 10200. Elementary Modern Chinese II. 100 Units.

Part 2 of this three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese. By the end of the spring quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. A video project is required in spring quarter, which will be entered in the competition for the Chinese Video Project Award. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week. Additional small group discussions of 40 minutes per week will be arranged. Maximum enrollment for each section is 18. Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 10100, or placement, or consent of instructor

CHIN 10300. Elementary Modern Chinese III. 100 Units.

Part 3 of this three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese. By the end of the spring quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. A video project is required in spring quarter, which will be entered in the competition for the Chinese Video Project Award. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week. Additional small group discussions of 40 minutes per week will be arranged. Maximum enrollment for each section is 18.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 10200, or placement, or consent of instructor

CHIN 11100-11200-11300. First-Year Chinese for Bilingual Speakers I-II-III.

This three-quarter series is intended for bilingual speakers of Chinese. Our objectives include teaching students standard pronunciation and basic skills in reading and writing, while broadening their communication skills for a wider range of contexts and functions. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week. Consultation with instructor encouraged prior to enrollment. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

CHIN 11100. First-Year Chinese for Heritage Students I. 100 Units.

Part 1 of this three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese to bilingual speakers. Bilingual Speakers are those who can speak Chinese but do not know how to read or write. By the end of the spring quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. A video project is required in spring quarter, which will be entered in the competition for the Chinese Video Project Award. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week MWF. Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Consent of Director of Chinese Language Program

CHIN 11200. First-Year Chinese for Heritage Students-II. 100 Units.

Part 2 of this three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese to bilingual speakers. Bilingual Speakers are those who can speak Chinese but do not know how to read or write. By the end of the spring quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. A video project is required in spring quarter, which will be entered in the competition for the Chinese Video Project Award. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week MWF.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 11100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

CHIN 11300. First-Year Chinese for Heritage Students-III. 100 Units.

Part 3 of this three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese to bilingual speakers. Bilingual Speakers are those who can speak Chinese but do not know how to read or write. By the end of the spring quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. A video project is required in spring quarter, which will be entered in the competition for the Chinese Video Project Award. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week MWF.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 11200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

CHIN 15000. Chinese in Beijing. 100 Units.

CHIN 20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Modern Chinese I-II-III.

The goal of this sequence is to enhance students’ reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics at an intermediate linguistic level. In addition to mastering the content of the textbook, students are required to complete two language projects each quarter. Chinese computing skills are also taught. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted. Two sections.

CHIN 20100. Intermediate Modern Chinese I. 100 Units.

Part 1 of this sequence aims to enhance students' reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics at an intermediate linguistic level. In addition to mastering the content of the textbook, students are required to complete two language projects each quarter. Chinese computing skills are also taught. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 10300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

CHIN 20200. Intermediate Modern Chinese II. 100 Units.

Part 2 of this sequence aims to enhance students' reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics at an intermediate linguistic level. In addition to mastering the content of the textbook, students are required to complete two language projects each quarter. Chinese computing skills are also taught. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

CHIN 20300. Intermediate Modern Chinese III. 100 Units.

Part 3 of this sequence aims to enhance students' reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics at an intermediate linguistic level. In addition to mastering the content of the textbook, students are required to complete two language projects each quarter. Chinese computing skills are also taught. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 34300

CHIN 31100-31200-31300. Business Chinese I-II-III.

This three-quarter sequence aims at improving overall language skills and introduces business terminology. Students learn about companies and their services and/or products, the stock market, real estate market, insurance, and e-commerce. The class meets for three ninety-minute sessions a week.

CHIN 31100. Business Chinese I. 100 Units.

Part one of this three-quarter sequence aims at improving overall language skills and introduces business terminology. Students will learn about companies and their services and/or products, the stock market, real estate market, insurance, and e-commerce. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20701

CHIN 31200. Business Chinese II. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20701, or CHIN 31100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20702

CHIN 31300. Business Chinese III. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20702, or CHIN 31200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20703

CHIN 20800-20900-21000. Elementary Literary Chinese I-II-III.

This sequence introduces the basic grammar of the written Chinese language from the time of the Confucian Analects to the literary movements at the beginning of the twentieth century. Students will read original texts of genres that include philosophy, memorials, and historical narratives. Spring Quarter is devoted exclusively to reading poetry. The class meets for two eighty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

CHIN 20800. Elementary Literary Chinese I. 100 Units.

Introduction to the Chinese literary language from the first millennium B.C.E. to the end of the imperial period. While surveying a variety of literary genres (such as, philosophical and historical texts, poetry, and essays), focus is on grammatical structures and translation methods.

Instructor(s): L. Skosey     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20300, or placement, or consent of instructor. Auditing is not permitted. Must be taken for a quality grade.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 20800

CHIN 20900. Elementary Literary Chinese II. 100 Units.

Introduction to the Chinese literary language from the first millennium B.C.E. to the end of the imperial period. While surveying a variety of literary genres (such as, philosophical and historical texts, poetry, and essays), focus is on grammatical structures and translation methods.

Instructor(s): L. Skosey     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20800, or placement, or consent of instructor. Auditing is not permitted. Must be taken for a quality grade.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 20900

CHIN 21000. Elementary Literary Chinese III. 100 Units.

Introduction to the Chinese literary language from the first millennium B.C.E. to the end of the imperial period. While surveying a variety of literary genres (such as, philosophical and historical texts, poetry, and essays), focus is on grammatical structures and translation methods.

Instructor(s): L. Skosey     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20900, or placement, or consent of instructor. Auditing is not permitted. Must be taken for a quality grade.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 21000, CHIN 31000

CHIN 60000. Rdg Crse: Spec Topic Chinese. 100 Units.

CHIN 60100. Directed Rdg: Adv Chinese. 100 Units.

JAPANESE COURSES

JAPN 10100-10200-10300. Elementary Modern Japanese I-II-III.

This is the first year of a three-year program, which is intended to provide students with a thorough grounding in modern Japanese. Grammar, idiomatic expressions, and vocabulary are learned through oral work, reading, and writing in and out of class. Daily practice in speaking, listening, reading, and writing is crucial. Students should plan to continue their language study through at least the second-year level to make their skills practical. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

JAPN 10100. Elementary Modern Japanese I. 100 Units.

This is the first year of a three-year program, which is intended to provide students with a thorough grounding in modern Japanese. Grammar, idiomatic expressions, and vocabulary are learned through oral work, reading, and writing in and out of class. Daily practice in speaking, listening, reading, and writing is crucial. Students should plan to continue their language study through at least the second-year level to make their skills practical. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 10200. Elementary Modern Japanese II. 100 Units.

Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted. This is the first year of a three-year program designed to provide students with a thorough grounding in Modern Japanese. Grammar, idiomatic expressions, and vocabulary are learned through oral work, reading, and writing in and out of class. Daily practice in speaking, listening, reading and writing is crucial. Students should plan to continue their language study through at least the second-year level to make their skills practical. The class meets for five fifty-minute periods a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 10100, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 10300. Elementary Modern Japanese-III. 100 Units.

This is the first year of a three-year program designed to provide students with a thorough grounding in Modern Japanese. Grammar, idiomatic expressions, and vocabulary are learned through oral work, reading, and writing in and out of class. Daily practice in speaking, listening, reading and writing is crucial. Students should plan to continue their language study through at least the second-year level to make their skills practical. The class meets for five fifty-minute periods a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 10200, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Modern Japanese I-II-III.

The emphasis on spoken language in the first half of the course gradually shifts toward reading and writing in the latter half. Classes conducted mostly in Japanese. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

JAPN 20100. Intermediate Modern Japanese I. 100 Units.

JAPN20100 continues to work on building a solid foundation for basic Japanese language skills while preparing students to progress to an Intermediate level. The emphasis on the spoken language gradually shifts toward reading and writing in JAPN 20200 and 20300, but spoken Japanese continues to be enriched throughout the sequence. Students at this level will be able to handle successfully a variety of uncomplicated communicative tasks in straightforward social situations. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions each week, conducted mostly in Japanese. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 10300, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 20200. Intermediate Modern Japanese II. 100 Units.

The emphasis on spoken language in the first half of the course gradually shifts toward reading and writing in the latter half. The course is conducted mostly in Japanese and meets for five fifty-minute periods a week.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade.

JAPN 20300. Intermediate Modern Japanese III. 100 Units.

The emphasis on spoken language in the first half of the course gradually shifts toward reading and writing in the latter half. The course is conducted mostly in Japanese and meets for five fifty-minute periods a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

JAPN 21200-21300. Intermediate Modern Japanese through Japanimation I-II.

This sequence focuses on learning spoken Japanese that is aimed at native speakers. Our goals are to get students accustomed to that sort of authentic Japanese and to enable them to speak with high fluency. To keep the balance, writing and reading materials are provided. Students are encouraged to watch videos and practice their speaking.

JAPN 21200. Intermediate Modern Japanese Through Japanimation I. 100 Units.

This course focuses on learning spoken Japanese through full-length Japanese animated films. To ensure balance in learning, writing and reading materials are also provided. Students at this level are able to handle successfully a variety of uncomplicated communicative tasks in straightforward social situations. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions each week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20100, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 21300. Intermediate Modern Japanese through Japanimation II. 100 Units.

This course focuses on learning spoken Japanese that is aimed at native speakers. The goals are getting accustomed to that sort of authentic Japanese and being able to speak with a high degree of fluency. To keep a balance, writing and reading materials are provided. Watching videos and practicing speaking are the keys to success in this course.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 21200, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 20401-20402-20403. Advanced Modern Japanese I-II-III.

The third year marks the end of the basic modern language study. Our goal is to help students learn to understand authentic written and spoken materials with reasonable ease. The texts are all authentic materials with some study aids. Classes conducted in Japanese. The class meets for three eighty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

JAPN 20401. Advanced Modern Japanese I. 100 Units.

The goal is to help students learn to understand authentic written and spoken materials with reasonable ease and to solidify the grammar, vocabulary and kanji foundation built during the students' study at Elementary and Intermediate Modern Japanese levels. Students will expand their four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) as well as the socio-cultural knowledge they need for communication, thereby easing their transition into Advanced Japanese. The class meets for three eighty-minute sessions each week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20300, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 20402. Advanced Modern Japanese II. 100 Units.

The third year marks the end of the basic modern language study. Our goal is to help students learn to understand authentic written and spoken materials with reasonable ease. The texts are all authentic materials with some study aids. Classes conducted in Japanese. The class meets for three eighty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20401, or JAPN 30100, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 20403. Advanced Modern Japanese III. 100 Units.

The third year marks the end of the basic modern language study. The purpose of the course is to help students learn to understand authentic written and spoken materials with reasonable ease. The texts are all authentic materials with some study aids. All work in Japanese. The class meets for three eighty-minute periods a week.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20402, or JAPN 30200, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 24900-24902-24903. Pre-Modern Japanese: Kindai Bungo I-II-III.

This course focuses on the reading of scholarly Japanese materials with the goal of enabling students to do independent research in Japanese after the course’s completion. Readings are from historical materials written in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

JAPN 24900. Pre-Modern Japanese: Kindai Bungo I. 100 Units.

The course is a systematic introduction to pre-modern and early-modern texts written in classical Japanese (bungo or kogo), the standard written language in Japan up to the beginning of the twentieth century. We will learn and absorb the fundamentals of classical Japanese grammar and engage with some of the core grammatical problematics of the language. Throughout the course students will gain a firm foundation in how the language is constructed, increase their comprehension of the language's vocabulary, and will familiarize themselves with original texts in prose and poetry alike, including narrative fiction (monogatari), anecdotes (setsuwa), essays (zuihitsu), and traditional Japanese poems (waka). The goal is to acquire a firm foundation in the classical language and to be able to read pre-modern texts with the help of a dictionary, for the purpose of academic research.

Instructor(s): O. Porath     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20300 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 34900

JAPN 24902. Pre-Modern Japanese: Kindai Bungo II. 100 Units.

TBD

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20300 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 34902

JAPN 24903. Pre-Modern Japanese: Kindai Bungo III. 100 Units.

TBD

Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 34903

JAPN 20600. 4th-Year Modern Japanese II. 100 Units.

Open to both undergraduates and graduates. This course is designed to improve Japanese reading, speaking, writing and listening ability to the advanced high level as measured by the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Proficiency Guidelines. Weekly assignments will require students to tackle modern Japanese texts of varying length and difficulty. Organized around a range of thought-provoking themes (from brain death and organ transplants to Japanese values on work and religion), reading assignments will include academic theses in psychology and anthropology, literary texts, and popular journalism. After completing the readings, students will be encouraged to discuss each topic in class. Videos/DVDs will be used to improve listening comprehension skills. There will also be writing assignments.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20500, or JAPN 40500, or placement, or consent of instructor

KOREAN COURSES

KORE 10100-10200-10300. Introduction to the Korean Language I-II-III.

This introductory sequence is designed to provide a basic foundation in modern Korean language and culture by focusing on the balanced development of the four basic language skills of speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Students in KORE 10100 begin by learning the complete Korean writing system (Hangul), which is followed by lessons focusing on basic conversational skills and grammatical structures. To provide sufficient opportunities to apply what has been learned in class, there are small group drill sessions, weekly Korean television drama screenings, and a number of other cultural activities (e.g., Korean New Year’s game competitions). The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

KORE 10100. Introduction to the Korean Language I. 100 Units.

KORE10100 is the first course of the three Introductory Korean sequences which is designed to build students' solid foundation in modern Korean language and culture. Students will learn how to read and write in Hangeul (the Korean alphabet) and how to communicate on a variety of daily topics such as self, family, location, food, and daily activities. In order to provide sufficient practice and opportunity to use what has been learned in real life situations, there will be small group practice sessions. In addition, students will be introduced to Korean culture through media, music, and other cultural activities.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Placement, or consent of instructor

KORE 10200. Introduction to the Korean Language II. 100 Units.

KORE 10200 is the second quarter of the Introductory Korean sequences. It is designed to continue to build students' solid foundation in modern Korean language and culture. Students will learn how to communicate on a variety of familiar topics and how to handle straightforward social situations or transactions. In order to provide sufficient practice and opportunity to use what has been learned in class in real life situations, there will be small group sessions. In addition, the course will introduce students to Korean culture through media, music, and other cultural activities.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): KORE 10100, or placement, or consent of instructor. Must be taken for a letter grade.

KORE 10300. Introduction to the Korean Language III. 100 Units.

KORE 10300 is the third quarter of the Introductory Korean sequences. It is designed to continue to build students' solid foundation in modern Korean language and culture. Students will learn how to communicate on a variety of familiar topics and how to handle straightforward social situations or transactions. In order to provide sufficient practice and opportunity to use what has been learned in class in real life situations, there will be small group sessions. In addition, the course will introduce students to Korean culture through media, music, and other cultural activities.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KORE 10200, or placement, or consent of instructor. Must be taken for a letter grade.

KORE 20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Korean I-II-III.

As a continuation of KORE 10100-10200-10300, this sequence is intended to continue to build on students’ language skills with an emphasis on enhancing the speaking ability, presentational skills, composition writing skills, and usage of more complex constructions. Approximately 150 Chinese characters are introduced for the achievement of basic literacy and vocabulary expansion. The curriculum also includes media, authentic reading materials, and weekly Korean language table meetings to maximize cultural exposure and opportunities to apply Korean language skills in real life situations. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

KORE 20100. Intermediate Korean I. 100 Units.

As a continuation of KORE 10100-10200-10300, this sequence is intended to continue to build on students' language skills with an emphasis on enhancing the speaking ability, presentational skills, composition writing skills, and usage of more complex constructions. Approximately 150 Chinese characters are introduced for the achievement of basic literacy and vocabulary expansion. The curriculum also includes media, authentic reading materials, and weekly Korean language table meetings to maximize cultural exposure and opportunities to apply Korean language skills in real life situations. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): KORE 10300, or placement, or consent of instructor

KORE 20200. Intermediate Korean II. 100 Units.

As a continuation of Beginning Korean, this course is to help students increase their communication skills (both oral and written) in the Korean language. Through an integrated framework of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, this course aims to increase fluency and accuracy in Korean. Videotapes and additional reading materials will be used in a supplementary fashion and approximately 100 Chinese characters will be introduced for the achievement of basic literacy. Classes are conducted mostly in Korean and meet for fifty-minute periods five times a week. Must be taken for a letter grade.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20100, or placement, or consent of instructor

KORE 20300. Intermediate Korean III. 100 Units.

As a continuation of Beginning Korean, this course is to help students increase their communication skills (both oral and written) in the Korean language. Through an integrated framework of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, this course aims to increase fluency and accuracy in Korean. Videotapes and additional reading materials will be used in a supplementary fashion and approximately 100 Chinese characters will be introduced for the achievement of basic literacy. Classes are conducted mostly in Korean and meet for fifty-minute periods five times a week. Must be taken for a letter grade.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20200, or placement, or consent of instructor

KORE 21100-21200-21300. Fourth-Year Modern Korean I-II-III.

Fourth-Year Modern Korean I-II-III

KORE 21100. Fourth-Year Modern Korean I. 100 Units.

KORE 21100 is designed for the students who aim to improve their speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills to an advanced level. This course will focus on enhancing speed, accuracy, and comprehension in advanced listening and reading of authentic texts (such as newspaper articles, essays, poems, reports etc.) as well as the refinement of writing skills in various styles. Students will also discuss social and cultural issues in Korea using their analytic skills and knowledge acquired in class.

Instructor(s): Wonkyung Na     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: KORE 23003, placement or consent of instructor. Must be taken for a quality grade.

KORE 21200. Fourth-Year Modern Korean II. 100 Units.

KORE 21200 is the second quarter of the Fourth-Year Modern Korean sequences. It is designed to continue to improve students' speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills to an advanced level. This course will be focusing on enhancing speed, accuracy, and comprehension in advanced listening and reading of authentic texts (such as interviews, movies, novels, essays, reports, etc.) as well as the refinement of writing skills in various styles. Students will also discuss social, cultural, and political issues in Korea using their analytic skills and knowledge acquired in class.

Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: KORE 21100, placement or consent of instructor. Must be taken for a quality grade.

KORE 21300. Fourth-Year Modern Korean III. 100 Units.

In KORE 21300, students will learn basic principles, methods, and techniques in translation and apply appropriate strategies and methods to the practice and description of translation. Students will watch prerecorded lecture videos, complete their weekly translation assignments (Korean to English and English to Korean), and participate in group or individual sessions to discuss their translation works. Students will also choose a literary work or a text of their own choice for their final translation project. The materials covered in this class include medical guidelines, campaign flyers, newspaper articles, reports, brochures, resume, usiness/academic emails, and editorials.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: KORE 21200, placement or consent of instructor. Must be taken for a quality grade.