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Department of Comparative Human Development

Chair
Margaret Beale Spencer

Professors
Jennifer Cole
Susan Goldin-Meadow
Sydney Hans
Susan Levine
John A. Lucy
Dario Maestripieri
Martha K. McClintock
Richard Shweder

Associate Professors
William Goldstein
Guanglei Hong
Micere Keels
Jill Mateo
Lindsey Richland

Assistant Professors
Anna Mueller
Eugene Raikhel

Faculty Associates
Kathleen Cagney
E. Summerson Carr
Salikoko Mufwene
Kristen Schilt
Linda Waite
Amanda Woodward

Emeritus Faculty
R. Darrell Bock
Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
Irene Elkin
Ray Fogelson
Eugene T. Gendlin
David E. Orlinsky
Nancy Stein
Susan Stodolsky
Richard Taub
Judith Farquhar


The Department of Comparative Human Development was founded in 1940 by Carl Rogers (psychologist), Lloyd Warner (anthropologist), Robert Havighurst (sociologist), and Ralph Tyler (educator), to focus on the study of the individual within context. Its faculty believes that social life is too complex to be left within any one discipline. Consequently, the department brings together anthropologists, psychologists, sociologists, biologists, and applied statisticians whose work extends disciplinary boundaries and synthesizes theories, insights, questions, and methods from across the social science spectrum.  

Some current research programs include the impact of globalization on family relationships and the transition to adulthood, the relation of language to thought, the health consequences of social experiences, cultural politics of gender and sexual identity, models of biopsychological development, the nature of the self, the ethical and moral issues raised by increasingly multicultural societies, variations in the learning process in educational settings, and methods for investigating causality.

Each student is given faculty assistance in (1) planning a program of courses and training; (2) fulfilling the Divisional and Departmental steps leading to the Ph.D. degree; (3) obtaining a professional position after graduation. Each entering student is assigned to a faculty advisor who will serve until the student chooses a research advisor. The student should also consult with the Comparative Human Development Secretary for information regarding procedures.

Information on How to Apply

The application process for admission and financial aid for all Social Sciences graduate programs is administered through the divisional Office of the Dean of Students. The Application for Admission and Financial Aid, with instructions, deadlines and department specific information is available online at: https://apply-ssd.uchicago.edu/apply/

Questions pertaining to admissions and aid should be directed to admissions@ssd.uchicago.edu or (773) 702-8415. Most of the documents needed for the application can be uploaded through the online application. Any additional correspondence and materials sent in support of applications should be mailed to:

The University of Chicago
Division of the Social Sciences
Admissions Office, Foster 107
1130 East 59th Street
Chicago, IL 60637

Department Course Guidelines

Terms:

Required- Every Comparative Human Development Graduate Student must take this course

Distribution- Students need to take at least one qualified course in each of the 6 Graduate areas

Specialization- Students must take two additional courses in one of the 6 areas in which they wish to focus their studies

Every CHD student must take the following courses for a quality grade:

  • CHDV 40000 HD Concepts
  • Six distribution courses, one in each program area:
    • Comparative Behavioral Biology (1)
    • Society, Institutions, Culture and the Life Course (2)
    • Cultural Psychology, Psychological Anthropology, Immigration Studies (3)
    • Health, Vulnerability and Culture (4)
    • Language and Communication in Thought and Interaction (5)
    • Methods in Human Development Research (M)
  • Intermediate Statistics from among the following: 
CHDV 30101Applied Statistics in Human Development Research100
PPHA 31000Statistics for Public Policy I (**)100
PPHA 31100Statistics for Public Policy II (**)100
STAT 22000Statistical Methods and Applications100

(**) Both courses must be taken in sequence to fulfill requirement

  • CHDV 42401 Trial Research in Human Development-I and CHDV 42402 Trial Research in Human Development-II. May be taken pass/fail.
  • Two additional CHD courses in chosen area of specialization. If Methods in Human Development Research is your area of specialization, you must choose an additional area of specialization to take two courses in.

Students are not required to complete all these requirements by the end of their second year. However, they must have five quality grades by the end of spring of their first year, and ten quality grades by the end of the second year. A grade of B or better is required to satisfy the requirements of these courses. On average a graduate student should take at least two courses for quality grades in each quarter of their first two years. In addition, students will participate in elective courses and workshops in the department, and the University in consultation with their advisors.

Required Courses
CHDV 40000 HD Concepts will introduce students to the history, theoretical bases, and concepts of the field of human development, and to the major areas of inquiry in the Department of Comparative Human Development. This is taken during the fall quarter of the first or second year.

The seminars (CHDV 42401 Trial Research in Human Development-I and CHDV 42402 Trial Research in Human Development-II) will launch students into their research projects and will guide them from the beginning to the completion of those projects.

All students are required to enroll in a trial research seminar in the winter quarter of the first year and the autumn quarter of the second year. Trial research papers are due by spring quarter of the second year. The trial research project must be completed and formally approved by the faculty during the spring quarter of the student’s second year, then presented at the student Trial Research Conference. Students are expected to report regularly on the progress of their research to the trial research seminars. The trial research is carried out under the direction of the research advisor and is read by one other faculty member.

Advisors

Each student is assigned a faculty member at the beginning of the first year of study to serve as a research advisor. Students may change research advisors as their needs and interests evolve, but students are expected to be affiliated with one or more research advisors throughout their graduate careers

Evaluations

All students are evaluated each year in the program. To be considered in good standing and for continuation of financial aid, first and second year students must have earned at minimum five quality grades (B or better) over autumn and winter quarters by the time of the spring review, with satisfactory spring grades expected to follow. The evaluation at the end of the second year is particularly important, as it determines whether a student will be permitted to conduct dissertation research.

Students are expected to maintain an average of B+ or better. A student who can demonstrate basic competence in the core curricular areas may petition the faculty through the Chair's office to place into an advanced course in the same area. A well-qualified student may place out of intermediate statistics by examination provided by the instructor of the statistics course. If a student can demonstrate that they are unable to take any of the designated Methods courses, they may petition through the Chair's office to have an equally relevant and rigorous course from another department count towards the requirement.

Workshops

The University's Council on Advanced Studies oversees a series of interdisciplinary workshops, each of which reflects the research interests of a particular group of faculty members and graduate students.  The following workshops are sponsored by faculty members and organized by graduate students from the Department of Comparative Human Development (often in collaboration with faculty and students from other departments): Comparative Behavioral Biology; Self and Subjectivity; Education.  A full list of workshops is available at http://cas.uchicago.edu/

Courses

For more recently updated course plans, please see the Courses link at the top of this page, the Comparative Human Development Website, or the quarterly Time Schedules.

Programs

Students in consultation with faculty advisors develop their program of study appropriate to their professional goals and research interests. The department's central areas of study are described below.

Comparative Behavioral Biology (1)

This program investigates behavioral processes at the social, psychological and biological levels of organization in both humans and nonhuman animals. Current research is concentrated in three main areas. In the area of behavioral and reproductive endocrinology, research conducted with rodents and humans investigates the social and behavioral control of fertility and reproduction and the role of hormone behavior interactions in development throughout the life span. Specific topics of interest include mechanisms and function of estrous and menstrual synchrony, facultative adjustment of sex ratios, pheromonal communication, reproductive senescence, psychosomatics in obstetrics and gynecology, and the behavioral modulation of the immune function. In the area of comparative development, we use nonhuman primate and rodent models of parenting and development to investigate social, emotional, and endocrine aspects of mother infant attachment and infant development, with particular emphasis on interindividual variability both within and outside the normal range. Other topics of interest include affiliative and aggressive behavior, mating strategies, nonverbal communication and social cognition in rodents, primates and humans. In the area of social neuroscience, one topic of interest is evaluative processes, e.g., affective, attitudinal, or emotional operations by which individuals discriminate hostile from hospitable environments. Of interest as well is in the role of social and autonomic factors in individuals endocrine and cellular immune response to stress and illness vulnerability. Throughout, the research approach is characterized by the integration of social and biological levels of analysis. Example courses listed below have been offered in previous years but may not be offered in this academic year.

CHDV 30901Biopsychology of Sex Differences100
CHDV 34300Primate Behavior and Ecology *100
CHDV 34800Kinship and Social Systems *100
CHDV 37500Research Seminar in Animal Behavior I **100
CHDV 37502Research Seminar in Animal Behavior II **100
CHDV 37503Research Seminar in Animal Behavior III **100
CHDV 37850Evolutionary Psychology *100
CHDV 37950Evolution and Economics of Human Behavior100
CHDV 40900Behavioral Ecology100
PSYC 48001Mind and Biology Proseminar I (=CHDV 38000) **000
PSYC 48002Mind and Biology Proseminar II (=CHDV 38100) **000
PSYC 48003Mind and Biology Proseminar III (=CHDV 38200) **100
CHDV 48414Evolution of Human Development *100

(*) Satisfies the distribution requirement.

(**) All three quarters of sequence must be taken in order to receive a letter grade.

Society, Institutions, Culture and the Life Course (2)

The Department of Comparative Human Development has a long tradition of examining “development” not just in childhood, but over the entire life course. A basic premise of our approach is that how people change over their lives is shaped by, and also shapes, social institutions, cultural practices, material circumstances and biological potential. We are also interested in how normative models of human development become institutionalized, materialized, and potentially contested as they travel across different cultural or economic settings. Some current areas of research include the influence of families, peers, neighborhoods and economic inequality on individual trajectories and outcomes; the role of youth and generational change in contemporary social life; and how early childhood exposure to social and psychological deprivation contributes to subsequent vulnerability or resilience. A particular strength of the department is the study of how children learn in school settings and the role of gesture in learning and cognition. Faculty focused on education have unique expertise in the quantitative analysis of large data sets to distinguish the cross-cutting effects of age, cohort, and institutional context. We also seek to develop new experimental and qualitative methods that assess the relationship between cognitive competence and interaction in instructional settings. Faculty and students interested in life-course issues also engage in cross-cultural research in places as diverse as Madagascar, Mexico, India and Papua New Guinea. Example courses listed below have been offered in previous years but may not be offered in this academic year.

CHDV 23900Introduction to Language Development100
CHDV 30304Urban Neighborhoods and Urban Schools: Community Economic Opportunity and the Schools *100
CHDV 30305Inequality in Urban Spaces100
CHDV 31000Cultural Psychology: Philosophical and Theoretical Foundations *100
CHDV 31600Seminar in Language Development100
CHDV 31901Language, Culture, and Thought *100
CHDV 32100Culture, Power, Subjectivity100
CHDV 32101Culture and Power, Part II: Discourse and Performativity100
CHDV 40207Development in Adolescents *100
CHDV 40306Academic and Behavior Gender Gaps Along the Pathway to Degree Attainment100
CHDV 41160New Perspectives on Vulnerability *100
PSYC 43200Seminar in Language Development (=CHDV 41601) *100
PSYC 46650Embodiment, Thinking, and Learning100
CHDV 48414Evolution of Human Development *100

(*) Satisfies the distribution requirement.

Cultural Psychology, Psychological Anthropology, Immigration Studies (3)

Coming to terms with transnational migration and defining the scope and limits of tolerance for ethnic, religious and cultural diversity in North America and Europe has become one of the most pressing concerns for states and citizens in liberal democracies in the 21st century. The Department of Comparative Human Development has long been a leading center for training in psychological anthropology, cultural psychology, culture and mental health, and the cross cultural study of human development, with special attention to what the anthropologist Clifford Geertz once called “the force and durability of ties of religion, language, custom, locality, race, and descent in human affairs.” Faculty and students investigate ethnic and cultural sources of diversity in emotional and bodily functioning, conceptions of self and subjectivity, sexuality and gender identity, moral evaluation, and social cognition. We are also concerned with the social and political production and management of social differences as well as the conflicts that arise in the context of contemporary migration. Ethnographic field work both in the United States and abroad is an important component of this program, although students and faculty use multiple methods (qualitative and quantitative, observational, clinical and experimental) to understand the similarities and differences in psychological functioning across human populations. The program encourages the comparative social and cultural analysis of what people know, think, feel, desire and value in India, Japan, China, Russia, Africa and the Middle East, as well as research on the institutions, ideologies and economic circumstances that shape the experience of minorities in places ranging from Norway to France to the United States. Example courses listed below have been offered in previous years but may not be offered in this academic year.

CHDV 30117Transnational Kinship, Intimacy and Migration100
CHDV 30320Violence and Trauma100
CHDV 30401Intensive Study of a Culture: Lowland Maya History and Ethnography100
CHDV 30600Social Psychology100
CHDV 31000Cultural Psychology: Philosophical and Theoretical Foundations *100
CHDV 31901Language, Culture, and Thought *100
CHDV 32100Culture, Power, Subjectivity *100
CHDV 32101Culture and Power, Part II: Discourse and Performativity *100
CHDV 32212Love, Capital and Conjugality: Africa and India in Comparative Perspective100
CHDV 33301Culture, Mental Health, and Psychiatry *100
CHDV 33302Disordered States100
CHDV 41160New Perspectives on Vulnerability *100
CHDV 42214Ethnographic Writing100
CHDV 43302Illness and Subjectivity *100
CHDV 43600Processes of Judgement and Decision Making100
CHDV 44700Seminar: Topics in Judgement and Decision Making100
CHDV 45600When Cultures Collide: The Multicultural Challenge *100
CHDV 45601Moral Psychology and Comparative Ethics100
CHDV 48415Displaced Nations and the Politics of Belonging100

(*) Satisfies the distribution requirement.

Health, Vulnerability and Culture (4)

The Department of Comparative Human Development maintains a tradition of examining health, illness and vulnerability from a variety of social science perspectives. We understand health, illness and vulnerability as experiences that are deeply shaped by inter-related social, political-economic, and psychobiological processes. We are also committed to the idea that how human beings experience distress is inextricable from the ways in which we recognize, represent and respond to it. We are thus equally concerned with the biosocial mechanisms through which health, illness and vulnerability become embodied in particular persons, as we are with the cultural and linguistic processes through which concepts such as “health,” “illness” and “vulnerability” are produced, enacted, institutionalized and contested. A particular strength of our program is the study of mental health and illness and of psychiatry as a social institution. Current areas of research include including culture and mental health; the comparative study of medical and healing systems; psychopathology and resilience across the life course; the psychosocial determinants of malignant and infectious disease; disability and vulnerability as conditions of ethical and political life; colonialism and traumatic social memory; the social consequences of the neurosciences and genetics; and illness, subjectivity and embodiment. Faculty and students employ a range of ethnographic, experimental and epidemiological methods, and have carried out fieldwork in settings including China, France, India, Madagascar, Russia, Scandinavia and the United States. Example courses listed below have been offered in previous years but may not be offered in this academic year.

CHDV 30320Violence and Trauma100
CHDV 30405Anthropology of Disability100
CHDV 31800Modern Psychotherapies *100
CHDV 33301Culture, Mental Health, and Psychiatry *100
ANTH 33620Medicine and Anthropology (=CHDV 33620)100
CHDV 36400Theories of Emotion and the Psychology of Well Being *100
CHDV 38701Social and Cultural Foundations of Mental Health100
CHDV 40110Color, Ethnicity, Cultural Context, and Human Vulnerability100
CHDV 41160New Perspectives on Vulnerability *100
CHDV 43302Illness and Subjectivity *100
CHDV 43400The Social Lives of Brains100
CHDV 44200Emerging Concepts in Medical and Psychological Anthropology100
CHDV 45205Pushing the Boundary: Current Debates on Animals and the Species Divide100

(*) Satisfies the distribution requirement.

Language and Communication in Thought and Interaction (5)

This program area supports research and training on how language and other forms of social communication support and shape individual thought and social interaction. The program encompasses three intersecting areas. First, it compares communicative modalities across species, especially among the social mammals, with particular attention to the role played by language in human evolution and development by enabling the emergence of self, culture, and conceptual thought. Second, it compares linguistic and other communicative traditions across human societies with respect to their effects on thought and interaction, with particular attention to the impact of language diversity, multilingualism, the interplay of verbal and nonverbal communication, and language socialization. And third, it compares both within and across societies the various specialized structures and discursive uses of language deployed within specialized institutional settings and ideological regimes such as education, therapy, science, religion, politics, etc. Across all three areas, there is an emphasis on bringing together a firm grounding in the formal analysis of the communicative modalities with substantive understanding of the psychological and social fields within which they operate. Example courses listed below have been offered in previous years but may not be offered in this academic year.

CHDV 23900Introduction to Language Development *100
CHDV 31901Language, Culture, and Thought *100
PSYC 43200Seminar in Language Development (=CHDV 41601) *100
CHDV 43550Gesture100
CHDV 45501Cognition and Education *100
CHDV 53350Gesture, Sign, and Language100

(*) Satisfies the distribution requirement.

Methods in Human Development Research (M)

Research on human development over the life span and across social and cultural contexts thrives on multiple theoretical perspectives. This research requires creation and improvement of a wide range of research methods appropriately selected for and tailored to specific human development problems. Faculty in the department employ research methods that span the full range from primarily qualitative to primarily quantitative and to strategic mix of both. Across all the substantive domains in Comparative Human Development, theoretical understanding is greatly advanced by methodology; therefore the Department pays serious attention to research design, data collection, analytic strategies, and presentation, evaluation, and interpretations of evidence. The Department has contributed some of the most influential work on psychological scaling on the basis of the item response theory (IRT), multivariate statistical methods, analysis of qualitative data, modeling of human growth, and methods for cross-cultural analysis. Current research interests include (a) assessment of individual growth and change in important domains of development that are often intertwined, (b) examination and measurement of the structure, process, and quality of individual and group experiences in institutionalized settings such as families, schools, clinics, and neighborhoods, and (c) evaluation of the impact of societal changes or interventions on human development via changes in individual and group experiences, with particular interest in the heterogeneity of growth, process, and impact across demographic sub-populations and across social cultural contexts. Example courses listed below have been offered in previous years but may not be offered in this academic year.

CHDV 30005Statistical Methods of Research-2100
CHDV 30101Applied Statistics in Human Development Research *100
CHDV 30102Introduction to Causal Inference *100
CHDV 32411Mediation, Moderation, and Spillover Effects *100
CHDV 37802Challenging Legends and Other Received Truths: A Socratic Practicum100
CHDV 39301Qualitative Research Methods100
SOCI 40112Ethnographic Methods100
CHDV 42214Ethnographic Writing *100
CHDV 43248Research Methods in Behavior and Development100

(*) Satisfies the distribution requirement.

Comparative Human Development Courses

CHDV 30101. Applied Statistics in Human Development Research. 100 Units.

This course provides an introduction to quantitative methods of inquiry and a foundation for more advanced courses in applied statistics for students in social sciences who are interested in studying human development in social contexts. The course covers univariate and bivariate descriptive statistics, an introduction to statistical inference, t test, two-way contingency table, analysis of variance, simple linear regression, and multiple regression. All statistical concepts and methods will be illustrated with applications to a series of scientific inquiries organized around describing and understanding adolescent transitions into adulthood across demographic subpopulations in contemporary American society. We will use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97) throughout the course to reveal disparities between subpopulations in opportunities and life course outcomes. At the end of the course, students should be able to define and use descriptive and inferential statistics to analyze data and to interpret analytical results. No prior knowledge in statistics is assumed. High school algebra and probability are the only mathematical pre-requisites. Every student is required to participate in a lab section. Students will review the course content and learn to use the Stata software in the lab under the TA’s guidance.

Instructor(s): G. Hong     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): At least one college-level mathematics course, can be a high school AP course, First priority for CHDV grads and 2nd priority CHDV undergrad majors
Note(s): CHDV Distribution, M*, M*
Equivalent Course(s): CHDV 20101

CHDV 30102. Introduction to Causal Inference. 100 Units.

This course is designed for graduate students and advanced undergraduate students from the social sciences, education, public health science, public policy, social service administration, and statistics who are involved in quantitative research and are interested in studying causality. The goal of this course is to equip students with basic knowledge of and analytic skills in causal inference. Topics for the course will include the potential outcomes framework for causal inference; experimental and observational studies; identification assumptions for causal parameters; potential pitfalls of using ANCOVA to estimate a causal effect; propensity score based methods including matching, stratification, inverse-probability-of-treatment-weighting (IPTW), marginal mean weighting through stratification (MMWS), and doubly robust estimation; the instrumental variable (IV) method; regression discontinuity design (RDD) including sharp RDD and fuzzy RDD; difference in difference (DID) and generalized DID methods for cross-section and panel data, and fixed effects model. Intermediate Statistics or equivalent is a prerequisite. This course is a pre-requisite for “Advanced Topics in Causal Inference” and “Mediation, moderation, and spillover effects.”

Instructor(s): G. Hong     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Statistics or equivalent such as STAT 224/PBHS 324, PP 31301, BUS 41100, or SOC 30005 is a prerequisite.
Note(s): Graduate course, open to advanced undergraduates. CHDV Distribution, M*, M*
Equivalent Course(s): STAT 31900,SOCI 30315,PBHS 43201,PLSC 30102

CHDV 30150. Language and Communication. 100 Units.

This course can also be taken by students who are not majoring in Linguistics but are interested in learning something about the uniqueness of human language, spoken or signed. It covers a selection from the following topics: What is the position of spoken language in the usually multimodal forms of communication among humans? In what ways does spoken language differ from signed language? What features make spoken and signed language linguistic? What features distinguish linguistic means of communication from animal communication? How do humans communicate with animals? From an evolutionary point of view, how can we account for the fact that spoken language is the dominant mode of communication in all human communities around the world? Why cannot animals really communicate linguistically? What do the terms language "acquisition" and "transmission" really mean? What factors account for differences between "language acquisition" by children and by adults? Are children really perfect language learners? What factors bring about language evolution, including language speciation and the emergence of new language varieties? How did language evolve in mankind? This is a general education course without any prerequisites. It provides a necessary foundation to those working on language at the graduate and undergraduate levels.

Instructor(s): Salikoko Mufwene     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): CHDV Distribution, B*,C*; 5*
Equivalent Course(s): CHDV 20150,LING 20150,LING 30150

CHDV 30239. Language and Labor. 100 Units.

In this class we analyze the role played by language in labor management from the training of the workers, selecting them, and monitoring them at the workplace. We show how Taylorization (i.e. a form of work management based on breaking down occupations into small tasks dissociated from the skills of the workers) has reshaped not only the labor process but also the discourse on workers’ skills, including language skills. We also look at the ways in which language performance in the late modernity corporate world has increasingly become what many workers are recruited and therefore paid for.

Instructor(s): Vigouroux, Cecile     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): CHDV Distributions: C*; 2*, 5*
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 37525,LING 30239

CHDV 30240. Language and Economy: an Interdisciplinary Approach. 100 Units.

This course is about the relationship between language and economy, focusing on the ways in which the subject matter can be addressed theoretically and methodologically. Through reading some key texts, we will analyze how disciplines such as economics, linguistics, and anthropology have conceptualized this relationship. Among many topics, we will address issues about language development and language commodification, and about notions such as linguistic market and language as public good. We will explore ways in which linguistics and economics perspectives on the role of language in economic development and that of economic factors in language practices can be mutually enriching.

Instructor(s): Vigouroux, Cecile     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): CHDV Distributions: C*; 2*,5*
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 37530,LING 30241,CHDV 20240

CHDV 30245. Approaches to Social Literacy. 100 Units.

This course focuses on understanding the ways in which literacy practices and events are social phenomena inextricably linked to specific social and political circumstances. Looking at reading and writing not as simply cognitive accomplishments of individual minds but as socially embedded practices enables us to reflect on what counts as literacy for whom and in which context, how it is performed in different settings (home, school, workplace), and the extent to which it is a source of inequality among people.

Instructor(s): Vigouroux, Cecile     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): CHDV Distribution: C*; 2*, 5*
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 37520,LING 30242

CHDV 30249. Language and Migration. 100 Units.

This class offers a broad range of perspectives on issues regarding language in the context of migration. For instance we analyze the ways in which language has been instrumentalized by Nation-States to regiment and restrain the mobility of targeted populations. We deconstruct the straightforward correlation between socio-economic integration and language competence in discourse produced by politicians and some academics alike. We also analyze how different types of mobility (e.g., slavery, colonization, and free individual migration) produce, at different times, differing sociolinguistic dynamics.

Instructor(s): C. Vigouroux     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): CHDV Distribution: C*; 3*, 5*
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 37116,LING 30249

CHDV 30322. Reasoning Development. 100 Units.

This course examines the lifespan development of thinking and reasoning skills. We will examine the development of types of reasoning including causal, symbolic, analogical and explanation based thinking, discuss the role of aging on reasoning, and consider the roles of context and environment versus genetic and evolutionary foundations. Finally we will consider implications for educational contexts.

Instructor(s): Richland, L.     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): CHDV Distribution, B*; 2*

CHDV 30401. Intensive Study of a Culture: Lowland Maya History and Ethnography. 100 Units.

The survey encompasses the dynamics of first contact; long-term cultural accommodations achieved during colonial rule; disruptions introduced by state and market forces during the early postcolonial period; the status of indigenous communities in the twentieth century; and new social, economic, and political challenges being faced by the contemporary peoples of the area. We stress a variety of traditional theoretical concerns of the broader Mesoamerican region stressed (e.g., the validity of reconstructive ethnography; theories of agrarian community structure; religious revitalization movements; the constitution of such identity categories as indigenous, Mayan, and Yucatecan). In this respect, the course can serve as a general introduction to the anthropology of the region. The relevance of these area patterns for general anthropological debates about the nature of culture, history, identity, and social change are considered.

Instructor(s): J. Lucy     Terms Offered: Autumn,TBD
Note(s): CHDV Distribution: C*
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 21230,ANTH 30705,CHDV 20400,CRES 20400,LACS 30401,LACS 20400

CHDV 30405. Anthropology of Disability. 100 Units.

This seminar undertakes to explore "disability" from an anthropological perspective that recognizes it as a socially constructed concept with implications for our understanding of fundamental issues about culture, society, and individual differences. We explore a wide range of theoretical, legal, ethical, and policy issues as they relate to the experiences of persons with disabilities, their families, and advocates. The final project is a presentation on the fieldwork.

Instructor(s): M. Fred     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Third- or fourth-year standing
Note(s): CHDV Distribution: C, D; 4
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 20405,ANTH 30405,HMRT 25210,HMRT 35210,SOSC 36900,CHDV 20505,MAPS 36900

CHDV 30440. Inequality, Health, and The Life Course. 100 Units.

By virtue of who we are born to and the social world that surrounds us as we grow, some individuals have a better chance of living a long, healthy life than others. In this course, we leverage sociological and social scientific concepts, theories and methods to examine how these inequalities in morbidity, mortality, and health behaviors develop and change across the life course from infancy to later life. We will pay particular attention to how individual characteristics (namely gender, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and sexual orientation, but also genetic vulnerabilities) interact with social-structural, institutional, and cultural realities to shape individual’s physical and mental health. We will also discuss how social conditions, particularly during key developmental stages, can have lifelong consequences for individual’s health and well-being.

Instructor(s): A. Mueller     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): CHDV Distribution: B*, C*; 2*, 4*
Equivalent Course(s): SOCI 20248,SOCI 30248,CHDV 20440

CHDV 30609. Women’s Rights, Cultural Nationalisms and Moral Panics. 100 Units.

Contemporary history is rife with a tension between the rise of a rights discourse and accompanying moral panics. This dialectic constitutes the central theme of this course.  Why is it that women’s economic success, political recognition, and rights to their bodies have been accompanied by “moral panics” over the visibility, mobility, and sexuality of women and girls?  And what might this tell us about changing forms of differential citizenship in the contemporary world?  In order to take up these questions, this course offers a historical and anthropological perspective on the questions of gender and freedom/ moral panic/ differential citizenship.  We focus our inquiry on empirical examples drawn from Africa and India. 

Instructor(s): Cole, J., Majumdar, R.     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Undergrads with consent of instructors
Note(s): CHDV Distribution, 2*,3*
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 40101,SALC 43105,ANTH 35218,CDIN 43105

CHDV 30669. African Mobilities: Theories and Ethnography. 100 Units.

It would be difficult to overstate the centrality of the “migration crisis narrative” in current discussions of migration in Europe. Even before the refugee crisis this past year, images of overcrowded boats sinking in the Mediterranean, and the strident nationalist discourse with which so many European states have responded, had placed the issue front and center in the European political landscape. Although our attention this past summer was largely focused on the exodus out of Syria, it has long been the case that many of these migrants also hail from Africa. Generally, changes in the landscape of mobility have made the presence of Africans in global migration streams increasingly apparent. In light of these issues, this course examines African migration, but it is as much focused on theories of migration as it is on the specificities of African mobility. To that end, the class tacks back and forth between analyses of mobility within Africa, and studies of migration more generally. Topics to be addressed include governmentality and the creation of borders, the production of immobility, kinship and migration, and the role of mobility in the reproduction of African societies. Readings will include studies of migration from within the African continent, to Europe and to the United States.

Instructor(s): Cole, J.     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): CHDV Distribution, B*,C*; 2*,3*
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 32226

CHDV 31000. Cultural Psychology: Philosophical and Theoretical Foundations. 100 Units.

There is a substantial portion of the psychological nature of human beings that is neither homogeneous nor fixed across time and space. At the heart of the discipline of cultural psychology is the tenet of psychological pluralism, which states that the study of "normal" psychology is the study of multiple psychologies and not just the study of a single or uniform fundamental psychology for all peoples of the world. Research findings in cultural psychology thus raise provocative questions about the integrity and value of alternative forms of subjectivity across cultural groups. In this course we analyze the concept of "culture" and examine ethnic and cross-cultural variations in mental functioning with special attention to the cultural psychology of emotions, self, moral judgment, categorization, and reasoning.

Instructor(s): R. Shweder     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Third- or fourth-year standing. Instructor consent required.
Note(s): CHDV Distribution, B*, C*; 2*, 3*
Equivalent Course(s): AMER 33000,ANTH 24320,ANTH 35110,GNSE 21001,GNSE 31000,PSYC 23000,PSYC 33000,CHDV 21000

CHDV 31600. Seminar in Language Development. 100 Units.

Advanced undergraduates and MAPSS students should register for PSYC 33200. Psychology graduate students should register for PSYC 43200. This course addresses the major issues involved in first-language acquisition. We deal with the child's production and perception of speech sounds (phonology), the acquisition of the lexicon (semantics), the comprehension and production of structured word combinations (syntax), and the ability to use language to communicate (pragmatics).

Instructor(s): S. Goldin-Meadow     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): CHDV Distribution, B*; 2*,5*
Equivalent Course(s): PSYC 33200

CHDV 32200. Anthropology and ‘The Good Life’: Ethics, Morality, Well-Being. 100 Units.

This course takes a critical, historical and anthropological look at what is meant by “the good life.” Anthropologists have long been aware that notions of “the good” play an essential role in directing human behavior, by providing a life with meaning and shaping what it means to be a human being. Over the past several years, however, there has been an increasing demand for clarification on what is meant by “the good life,” as well as how cultural conceptions of “the good” relate to science, politics, religion, and personal practice. In this course, we will take up that challenge by exploring what is meant by “the good,” focusing on three domains in which it has most productively been theorized: ethics, morality, and well-being. Through a close reading of ethnographic and theoretical texts, as well as through analysis of documents and resources used and produced by different communities in order to explore the good life, we will gain an understanding of the different theoretical and methodological approaches for understanding the good in the social sciences, the various cultural logics shaping knowledge and practices of the good, and how human experience is shaped by those iterations in the process. The topics to be discussed include: the good life, moral reason, moral relativism, utility, deontology, virtue, happiness, well-being, flourishing, techniques of the self, spiritual exercises, professional ethics, neuroethics, and the moral sentiments.

Instructor(s): Francis Mckay     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Upper-level undergrads by consent. Some knowledge of moral philosophy useful, but not necessary to take the course. CHDV Distribution: C*; 3*
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 24345,ANTH 35130,MAPS 32200

CHDV 37201. Language in Culture I. 100 Units.

Among topics discussed in the first half of the sequence are the formal structure of semiotic systems, the ethnographically crucial incorporation of linguistic forms into cultural systems, and the methods for empirical investigation of “functional” semiotic structure and history.

Instructor(s): M. Silverstein     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor
Note(s): CHDV Distribution: 5*
Equivalent Course(s): LING 31100,PSYC 47001,ANTH 37201

CHDV 37202. Language in Culture II. 100 Units.

The second half of the sequence takes up basic concepts in sociolinguistics and their critique.

Instructor(s): Kristina Wirtz     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): LING 31200,PSYC 47002,ANTH 37202

CHDV 37801. Evolutionary Psychology. 100 Units.

This course explores human social behavior from the perspective of a new discipline: evolutionary psychology. In this course we will read and discuss articles in which evolutionary theory has been applied to different aspects of human behavior and social life such as: developmental sex differences, cooperation and altruism, competition and aggression, physical attractiveness and mating strategies, incest avoidance and marriage, sexual coercion, parenting and child abuse, language and cognition, and psychological and personality disorders.

Instructor(s): D. Maestriperi, D. Gallo     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Undergraduates must have permission of instructor.
Note(s): CHDV Distributions: A*; 1*
Equivalent Course(s): PSYC 41450,CHDV 41451,CHDV 37850

CHDV 37850. Evolutionary Psychology. 100 Units.

This course explores human social behavior from the perspective of a new discipline: evolutionary psychology. In this course we will read and discuss articles in which evolutionary theory has been applied to different aspects of human behavior and social life such as: developmental sex differences, cooperation and altruism, competition and aggression, physical attractiveness and mating strategies, incest avoidance and marriage, sexual coercion, parenting and child abuse, language and cognition, and psychological and personality disorders.

Instructor(s): D. Maestriperi, D. Gallo     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Undergraduates must have permission of instructor.
Note(s): CHDV Distributions: A*; 1*
Equivalent Course(s): PSYC 41450,CHDV 41451,CHDV 37801

CHDV 37950. Evolution and Economics of Human Behavior. 100 Units.

This course explores how evolutionary biology and behavioral economics explain many different aspects of human behavior. Specific topics include evolutionary theory, natural and sexual selection, game theory, cost-benefit analyses of behavior from an evolutionary and a behavioral economics perspective, aggression, power and dominance, cooperation and competition, biological markets, parental investment, life history and risk-taking, love and mating, physical attractiveness and the market, emotion and motivation, sex and consumer behavior, cognitive biases in decision-making, and personality and psychopathology.

Instructor(s): D. Maestripieri     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): CHDV Distribution, A*; 1*
Equivalent Course(s): PSYC 27950,PSYC 37950,BIOS 29265,ECON 14810,CHDV 27950

CHDV 38901. Intermediate Modern Spoken Yucatec Maya 1. 100 Units.

The course will emphasize learning the rudiments of the contemporary spoken language to enable further work on the language (or related ones) and/or to facilitate the use of the language for other historical or anthropological projects. Regularly scheduled class time will be evenly divided between practice in speaking and hearing the language and discussions of basic grammar, resources (e.g., grammars, dictionaries, text collections, etc.), the language family, cultural and historical context, salient linguistic issues especially in the areas of morphology and semantics, pragmatics and usage, and practical research methods.

Instructor(s): J. Lucy     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Students should have completed the first year Yucatec sequence prior to registration.
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 28901,CHDV 28901,LACS 38901

CHDV 39900. Readings: Human Development. 100 Units.

This course is often taken with the student's adviser in preparation for their thesis proposal.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn,Winter,Spring
Prerequisite(s): Instructor consent required.

CHDV 40000. HD Concepts. 100 Units.

Our assumptions about the processes underlying development shape how we read the literature, design studies, and interpret results.  The purpose of this course is two-fold in that, first, it makes explicit both our own assumptions as well as commonly held philosophical perspectives that impact the ways in which human development is understood. Second, the course provides an overview of theories and domain-specific perspectives related to individual development across the life-course.  The emphasis is on issues and questions that have dominated the field over time and, which continue to provide impetus for research, its interpretation, and the character of policy decisions and their implementation. Stated differently, theories have utility and are powerful tools. Accordingly, the course provides a broad basis for appreciating theoretical approaches to the study of development and for understanding the use of theory in the design of research and its application. Most significant, theories represent heuristic devices for “real time” interpretations of daily experiences and broad media disseminated messages.

Instructor(s): J. Lucy     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHD Grad Students Only
Note(s): CHDV Distribution, R

CHDV 40102. Advanced Topics in Causal Inference. 100 Units.

This course provides an in-depth discussion of selected topics in causal inference that are beyond what are covered in the introduction to causal inference course. The course is intended for graduate students and advanced undergraduate students who have taken the “introduction to causal inference” course or its equivalent and want to extend their knowledge in causal inference. The course is particularly suitable for students who plan to conduct scientific research that involve investigations of causal relationships as well as for those with strong methodological interests. Topics will include (1) alternative matching methods, randomization inference for testing hypothesis and sensitivity analysis; (2) marginal structural models and structural nested models for time-varying treatment; (3) Rubin Causal Model (RCM) and Heckman’s scientific model of causality; (4) latent class treatment variable; (5) measurement error in the covariates; (6) the M-estimation for the standard error of the treatment effect for the use of IPW; (7) the local average treatment effect (LATE) and its problems, sensitivity analysis to examine the impact of plausible departure from the IV assumptions, and identification issues of multiple IVs for multiple/one treatments; (8) multilevel experimental designs and observational data for treatment evaluation; (9) nonignorable missingness and informative censoring issues.

Instructor(s): G. Hong, K. Yamaguchi, F. Yang     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Statistics such as STAT 224/PBHS 324, PP 31301, BUS 41100, or SOC 30005 and Introduction to causal inference or their equivalent are prerequisites.
Note(s): CHDV Distribution, M*
Equivalent Course(s): SOCI 40412

CHDV 40203. Youth of the Great Recession. 100 Units.

This research seminar is designed for graduate students who are eager to investigate how the Great Recession in the past decade has affected the life course trajectories of people, especially children and youth, in various demographic groups defined by the intersections of social class, race/ethnicity, gender, and urbanisity. Dramatic changes in the economic context have posed challenges to individuals, families, and communities to various degrees, which offer opportunities to revisit and possibly revise theories about human development. The class will raise big questions substantiated by the literature and will ask specific questions for empirical investigation. These questions will then evolve into research projects to be carried out collectively or individually through analyzing large-scale longitudinal data sets. The process will involve discussions of appropriate research designs, development of data analytic plans, and interpretations of empirical evidence. Throughout the course, students will receive hands-on training on how to write an empirical paper for an academic journal. Students are expected to produce single-authored or co-authored manuscripts at the end of the course. Pre-requisites for this course are at least one and preferably two applied statistics courses.

Instructor(s): G. Hong     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHDV 30101 or equivalent required; two or more applied statistics courses preferred
Note(s): CHDV Distribution: 2*

CHDV 40207. Development in Adolescents. 100 Units.

Adolescence is a period of rapid growth and development irrespective of circumstances, contextual conditions and supports; thus, it represents both significant challenges and unique opportunities. The conceptual orientation taken acknowledges the noted difficulties but also speculates about the predictors of resiliency and the sources of positive youth development achieved. The course delineates the developmental period's complexity made worse by the many contextual and cultural forces due to socially structured conditions; that fact interact with youths' unavoidable and unique meaning-making processes. As a function of some youths' privileging circumstances versus the low resource and chronic conditions of others, both coping and identity formation processes are emphasized as highly consequential. Thus, stage specific developmental processes are explored for understanding gap findings for a society's diverse youth given citizenship requirements expected of all. In sum, the course presents the experiences of diverse youth from a variety of theoretical perspectives. The strategy improves our understanding about the "what" of human development as well as dynamic insights about the "how" and “why.” Ultimately, the conceptual orientation described is critical for 1) designing better social policy, 2) improving  the training and support of socializing agents (e.g., teachers), and 3) enhancing human developmental outcomes (e.g., resilient patterns).

Instructor(s): M. Spencer     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Graduate students only.
Note(s): CHDV Distribution: 2*
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 40207

CHDV 40315. Inequality in Urban Spaces. 100 Units.

The problems confronting urban schools are bound to the social, economic, and political conditions of the urban environments in which schools reside. Thus, this course will explore social, economic, and political issues, with an emphasis on issues of race and class as they have affected the distribution of equal educational opportunities in urban schools. We will focus on the ways in which family, school, and neighborhood characteristics intersect to shape the divergent outcomes of low- and middle-income children residing with any given neighborhood. Students will tackle an important issue affecting the residents and schools in one Chicago neighborhood.

Instructor(s): M. Keels     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): CHDV Distribution, B*; 2*
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 20305,PBPL 20305,CHDV 20305

CHDV 40772. Self and Other. 100 Units.

In this seminar, we will examine the relationship between self and other. In order to develop a comprehensive account of this multifaceted and multiform relationship, we will critically investigate the relationship of self to different types of ‘others’ ranging from primary caregivers and society to immediate as well as distant and despised interlocutors. We will supplement this discussion with an inquiry into the possibility and limits of self without an other, and visit the question of how human consciousness differs from that of other primates. In the course of our discussions, we will critically engage issues concerning the development of the self, its unity, individuality, and agency, and the possibilities of creativity, resistance and the transformation of the self. 

,

By the end of the quarter, you are expected to develop a deeper understanding of the relationship between self and other.

Instructor(s): S. Numanbayraktaroglu     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): CHDV Distribution: 3*

CHDV 40851. Topics in Developmental Psychology I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): CHDV Distribution, 2*
Equivalent Course(s): PSYC 40851

CHDV 41451. Evolutionary Psychology. 100 Units.

This course explores human social behavior from the perspective of a new discipline: evolutionary psychology. In this course we will read and discuss articles in which evolutionary theory has been applied to different aspects of human behavior and social life such as: developmental sex differences, cooperation and altruism, competition and aggression, physical attractiveness and mating strategies, incest avoidance and marriage, sexual coercion, parenting and child abuse, language and cognition, and psychological and personality disorders.

Instructor(s): D. Maestriperi, D. Gallo     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Undergraduates must have permission of instructor.
Note(s): CHDV Distributions: A*; 1*
Equivalent Course(s): PSYC 41450,CHDV 37850,CHDV 37801

CHDV 41601. Seminar in Language Development. 100 Units.

Advanced undergraduates and MAPSS students should register for PSYC 33200. Psychology graduate students should register for PSYC 43200. This course addresses the major issues involved in first-language acquisition. We deal with the child's production and perception of speech sounds (phonology), the acquisition of the lexicon (semantics), the comprehension and production of structured word combinations (syntax), and the ability to use language to communicate (pragmatics).

Instructor(s): S. Goldin-Meadow     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): CHDV Distribution, B*; 2*, 5*
Equivalent Course(s): PSYC 43200

CHDV 41920. The Evolution of Language. 100 Units.

How did language emerge in the phylogeny of mankind? Was its evolution saltatory or gradual? Did it start late or early and then proceed in a protracted way? Was the emergence monogenetic or polygenetic? What were the ecological prerequisites for the evolution, with the direct ecology situated in the hominine species itself, and when did the prerequisites obtain? Did there ever emerge a language organ or is this a post-facto construct that can be interpreted as a consequence of the emergence of language itself? What function did language evolve to serve, to enhance thought processes or to facilitate rich communication? Are there modern “fossils” in the animal kingdom that can inform our scholarship on the subject matter? What does paleontology suggest? We will review some of the recent and older literature on these questions and more.

Instructor(s): S. Mufwene     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): CHSS 41920,ANTH 47305,EVOL 41920,PSYC 41920,LING 21920,CHDV 21920,LING 41920

CHDV 42300. Development through the Life Course. 100 Units.

This course explores the biological and social patterning of lives from infancy through old age. Readings will include class and contemporary theory and research related to varied stages of the life course. Discussion will focus on paradigmatic themes in life course development such as: the social situation of lives in time and place, the interconnectedness of lives and generations, the nature of developmental transitions, the timing of life experiences, and the continuity of lives through time. Examples will be drawn from populations of traditional concern within social welfare policy and social work practice.

Instructor(s): Sydney Hans     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): PhD Students Only
Note(s): CHDV Distribution: 2*
Equivalent Course(s): SSAD 50400

CHDV 42401-42402. Trial Research in Human Development - I-II.

This course is taken in the Spring quarter of the first year, and again in the Autumn quarter of the second year. The purpose of this seminar is to help students formulate and complete their trial research projects.

CHDV 42401. Trial Research in Human Development-I. 100 Units.

This course is taken in the Spring quarter of the first year, and again in the Autumn quarter of the second year.  The purpose of this seminar is to help students formulate and complete their trial research projects.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHD grad students only.
Note(s): CHDV Distribution, R

CHDV 42402. Trial Research in Human Development-II. 100 Units.

Second in required Trial Research Seminar sequence. This course is taken in the Autumn quarter of the second year. The purpose of this seminar is to help students formulate and complete their trial research projects.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHDV 42401 Trial Research in Human Development-I. CHD graduate students only.
Note(s): CHDV Distribution, R

CHDV 43255. Assembling the Biosocial. 100 Units.

Over recent decades research in the life sciences has increasingly drawn attention to the ways in which processes taking place outside “the body proper” profoundly shape the materializations of health and illness. Rather than understanding brains or genes as determinative and relatively immutable templates for human bodies and behaviors, researchers working on neuroplasticity and epigenetics have increasingly focused on understanding how social and material environments and experiences “get under the skin.” While many social scientists have welcomed these developments as validating long-held views about the social determination of health and illness, others have warned these seemingly paradigmatic shifts may only lead to new forms of reductionism. Perhaps most fundamentally, such emergent research has been described as the grounds for a renewed biosocial research agenda or for the rethinking of interdisciplinary work between the life and social sciences. This course traces both the discussions and their historical background, addressing topics including: the nature/culture distinction in anthropology, conceptualizations of “plasticity,” “development,” and “heredity” in the life and social sciences, and the forms of interdisciplinary exchange and conversation which biosocial research may require.

Instructor(s): Raikhel, E.     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): CHDV Distribution: 1*, 4*
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 40350

CHDV 43600. Processes of Judgement and Decision Making. 100 Units.

This course offers a survey of research on judgment and decision making, with emphasis placed on uncertainty and (intrapersonal) conflict. An historical approach is taken in which the roots of current research issues and practices are traced. Topics are drawn from the following areas: evaluation and choice when goals are in conflict and must be traded off, decision making when consequences of the decision are uncertain, predictive and evaluative judgments under conditions of uncertain, incomplete, conflicting, or otherwise fallible information.

Instructor(s): W. Goldstein     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): PSYC 43600

CHDV 43760. Sensitive Periods: How the Timing of Exper Alters Its Effect. 100 Units.

Sensitive periods are defined as phases in life when experience has the most effect on a particular brain system. Typically occurring during development, experience during sensitive periods has long-term implications for sensory processing, affective development, cognitive processes, and production of complex learned behavior such as language. We will combine an investigation of biological underpinnings with behavioral consequences of sensitive periods and ask questions such as: How are sensitive periods defined during development?  Are sensitive periods for a variety of behaviors different or the same? How does experience intersect with the brain to encode and modify a sensitive period? Can we re-open sensitive periods after their normal end - and do we want to?

Instructor(s): S. London     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): CHDV Distribution: 1*
Equivalent Course(s): NURB 33370,PSYC 43760

CHDV 43770. Social Structure, Culture, and Human Development. 100 Units.

What leads people to set certain goals (among a wide set of possibilities), order their preferences, and make certain decisions? How does common sense come to be “common?” Why do people report thinking one thing and then do the opposite? How do social emotions like shame or pride influence behavior and how do they become social in the first place? Like gravity, social structure (like social networks) and culture (like belief systems, social norms) facilitate and constrain what is possible and what is probable for feeling, thinking, and doing. Like gravity, social structure and culture are often invisible, taken for granted forces that are external to us, but coerce nonetheless. This course explores how social scientists have theorized and empirically studied social structure as well as culture in relationship to a wide range of social behaviors, as well as how structure and culture can change due to the efforts of individuals and groups. In our exploration of the role of social structures and culture and human development, we will discuss topics relating to educational and occupational attainment, identity development in adolescence and young adulthood, the experience of life course transitions, health and deviant behaviors, and mental and physical health. Additionally, this course will provide an overview of sociological social network research as well as a review of leading perspectives linking culture to human behavior.

Instructor(s): A. Mueller     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): CHDV Distribution: 2*, 4*
Equivalent Course(s): SOCI 40220

CHDV 43901. Concepts in the anthropology of medicine. 100 Units.

This is a graduate level introduction to the anthropology of medicine. Students will focus on a number of foundational readings in the anthropology of medicine, with an emphasis on links to broader social and cultural theory. Topics covered will include the problem of belief; local theories of disease causation and healing efficacy; the placebo effect and contextual healing; theories of embodiment; medicalization; structural violence; modernity and the distribution of risk; the meanings and effects of new medical technologies; and global health.

Instructor(s): E. Raikhel     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): CHDV Distribution: 4*
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 40355

CHDV 44214. Gender, Health & Medicine. 100 Units.

From the day we are born til the day we die, we experience a gendered world that shapes our opportunities, our social interactions, and even our physical health and wellbeing. This course will provide an introduction to sociological perspectives on gender, physical and mental health, and medicine while also providing a deep interrogation of the social, institutional, and biological links between gender and health. We will discuss inequalities in morbidity, mortality, and health behaviors of women, men, and transgendered individuals from different race, ethnic, and class backgrounds, and we will use sociological concepts, theories, and methods to understand why these differences appear. Finally, we will examine how medicine as an institution and medical practices as organizations sometimes contribute to and combat gender inequality in health. By the end of the course, you will be familiar with social scientific perspectives on (1) gender, (2) mental and physical health, and (3) the practice of medicine, as well as some of the fundamental debates in current medical sociology and sociology of gender.

Instructor(s): A. Mueller     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): CHDV Distribution: 2*, 4*
Equivalent Course(s): SOCI 40221,GNSE 42214,PBHS 31414,CRES 44214

CHDV 44700. Seminar: Topics in Judgement and Decision Making. 100 Units.

This course offers a survey of research on judgment and decision making, with emphasis placed on uncertainty and (intrapersonal) conflict. An historical approach is taken in which the roots of current research issues and practices are traced. Topics are drawn from the following areas: evaluation and choice when goals are in conflict and must be traded off, decision making when consequences of the decision are uncertain, predictive and evaluative judgments under conditions of uncertain, incomplete, conflicting, or otherwise fallible information.

Instructor(s): W. Goldstein     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): PSYC 44700

CHDV 45600. When Cultures Collide: The Multicultural Challenge. 100 Units.

Coming to terms with diversity in an increasingly multicultural world has become one of the most pressing public policy projects for liberal democracies in the early 21st century.  One way to come to terms with diversity is to try to understand the scope and limits of toleration for variety at different national sites where immigration from foreign lands has complicated the cultural landscape.  This seminar examines a series of legal and moral questions about the proper response to norm conflict between mainstream populations and cultural minority groups (including old and new immigrants), with special reference to court cases that have arisen in the recent history of the United States.

Instructor(s): R. Shweder     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): CHDV Distribution: C; 3*
Equivalent Course(s): PSYC 45300,ANTH 45600,HMRT 35600,GNDR 45600

CHDV 47903. Beginning Modern Spoken Yucatec Maya III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): J. Lucy     Terms Offered: Spring,TBD. Will tentatively be offered during 2016-17
Equivalent Course(s): CHDV 27903,LACS 47903,LACS 27903

CHDV 48001. Mind and Biology Proseminar I. 000 Units.

The goal of this proseminar is to give graduate students the opportunity to be exposed to and discuss the research in biopsychology currently conducted at the Institute for Mind and Biology. The Mind and Biology Proseminar meets four times a quarter (plus an orientation meeting in Autumn quarter, each time for two hours.  A meeting consists of a 45 – 60 minute research presentation by an IMB faculty member (or a guest speaker) and 60 minutes of discussion. Students will earn 100 units in Spring quarter after completing the three-quarter sequence.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Consent only
Equivalent Course(s): PSYC 48001

CHDV 48420. Science meets literature: Elias Canetti’s Auto-da-Fé and human. 100 Units.

In this graduate seminar we will read the 1935 novel Auto-da-Fé by Elias Canetti (1981 Nobel Prize for Literature) and discuss it from the perspectives of different disciplines such as psychology and psychoanalysis, anthropology and sociology, history and philosophy, and literary criticism. One of the main themes of the seminar will be the relationship between Canetti’s representation of human mental and social processes in the novel and our current understanding of the human mind and human interpersonal relationships (e.g., understanding other minds, interpersonal communication, power dynamics, etc.).

Instructor(s): Maestripieri, D.     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): CHDV Distribution, 1*, 2*, 5*
Equivalent Course(s): KNOW 41401,GRMN 48417

CHDV 49900. Research in Human Development. 100 Units.

This course is often taken with the student's adviser in preparation for their dissertation.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn,Winter,Spring
Prerequisite(s): Instructor consent required. CHD graduate students only.