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Committee on International Relations

Chair

  • Paul Staniland

Professors

  • Michael Albertus, Political Science
  • Ralph A. Austen (Emeritus), History
  • John W. Boyer, History
  • Mark Philip Bradley, History
  • Austin Carson, Political Science
  • Dipesh Chakrabarty, South Asian Languages and Civilizations, History
  • Chiara Cordelli, Political Science
  • Terry Clark, Sociology
  • Bruce Cumings, History
  • Marco Garrido, Sociology
  • Adom Getachew, Political Science
  • Tom Ginsberg, Law, Political Science
  • Andreas Glaeser, Sociology
  • Robert Gulotty, Political Science
  • Susan Gzesh, Law
  • Gary B. Herrigel, Political Science
  • James Hevia, History
  • Kimberley Kay Hoang, Sociology
  • William Howell, Political Science
  • Ryan Cecil Jobson, Anthropology
  • Benjamin Lessing, Political Science
  • Darryl Li, Anthropology
  • Charles Lipson (Emeritus), Political Science
  • Joseph P. Masco, Anthropology
  • John J. Mearsheimer, Political Science
  • Monika Nalepa, Political Science
  • Robert Pape, Political Science
  • Steven Pincus, History
  • Jennifer Pitts, Political Science
  • Paul Poast, Political Science
  • Kenneth Pomeranz, History
  • Eric Posner, Law
  • James T. Sparrow, History
  • Paul Staniland, Political Science
  • Susan Stokes, Political Science
  • Nathan Tarcov, Political Science, Social Thought
  • Rochelle Layla Terman, Political Science
  • Jennifer Trinitapoli, Sociology
  • Lisa Wedeen, Political Science
  • Dali Yang, Political Science
  • Dingxin Zhao, Sociology

Assistant Senior Instructional Lecturers

  • Matthias Staisch, International Relations 

Senior Lecturer 

  • Michael Reese, International Relations

Lecturer

  • Anjali Anand, International Relations

Director of Career Services and Senior Program Officer

  • Shelly Robinson

Career Preparation & Programming Manager

  • Gözde Erdeniz

Student Affairs Administrator

  • E.G. Enbar

Administrative and Events Program Specialist

  • Vanessa Carey

Business Administrator

  • Tekeisha Yelton-Hunter

General Information

The MA Program in the Committee on International Relations (CIR) is the nation's oldest and preeminent professional research degree in International Relations.  Students enroll in courses across the Social Sciences as well as UChicago's Business, Law, and Public Policy schools.  They specialize in two of our five field concentrations: International Security, Conflict Studies and Contentious Politics; International Political Economy and Development; Comparative Studies in Political Institutions and Identity; Human Rights, Environment, and International Law; and Research Methods in the Social Sciences. 

CIR students take nine graduate courses and work directly with UChicago faculty on their MA thesis. Students are assisted in their course selections, and offered weekly mentorship for their research, by postdoctoral preceptors and by CIR staff.

CIR is highly selective for admission and offers substantial merit aid.

We offer exceptional career preparation that is tailored to the dozens of distinct career paths our students are pursuing.  Our programming includes one-on-advising on how to prepare a competitive PhD and JD application; internship and fellowship support; fully funded local, national, and international career development treks; and visits by leading alums who provide mentorship in a variety of fields. 

Students interested in combining a CIR M.A. with an M.B.A. can apply to a joint degree program with the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. A dual M.A./M.A. degree with the Harris School of Public Policy and an M.A. /J.D. with the University of Chicago Law School are also available.

Program Requirements and Course Work

CIR students complete two core seminars, enroll in an MA thesis workshop sequence, and submit a faculty-approved MA thesis.

Course Work

Our core seminars, “International Order and Security”  and "International Political Economy" examine the theoretical and methodological approaches that have been broadly influential in the study of International Relations. The seminars feature a mix of foundational and contemporary texts. They furnish a common vocabulary, and core analytical skills, that help students understand how their research commitments have been shaped by past investigators. 

In addition, students must successfully complete the introductory seminar Perspectives in International Relations (offered in the Autumn Quarter) and participate in the master's thesis workshop throughout the academic year. Master's workshops are led by CIR preceptors and give students the opportunity to present and discuss their research projects as they develop from proposal to final draft.

Because Perspectives is offered only in the Autumn Quarter, students may not begin the CIR program at any other time of year.
Courses are selected with the guidance of a CIR preceptor. Students register for three graduate classes per quarter, beginning in the Fall and continuing through the Winter and Spring. They take graduate courses in the departments of Anthropology, Economics, History, Political Science, Sociology, the centers for Latin American, Middle Eastern, and South Asian Studies, and professional schools of the University.

The Master’s Thesis

Students write an article-length MA thesis under the supervision of a UChicago faculty member. Their preceptor provides weekly assistance, and serves as the paper’s second reader.
The preceptor organizes and leads an MA thesis workshop in the Winter and Spring.
Both the faculty sponsor and the preceptor provide feedback on the proposal, the first draft, and give a written evaluation for the final submission.
Approximately 40% of CIR students graduate in June, and 60% in August.

Sample Thesis Topics

Some recent MA paper titles include:
"From Knowledge to Power: The Social Sciences, Propaganda, and America’s Rise to Hegemony"
"The Structural Origins of Tax Havens"
"Listening to the People: How Declining Responsiveness Drives Populist Sentiments" 
"American White Nationalists: Discourses of the Nation, the State, and Globalization"

"'Doing Good Looks Good On You?' Evaluating Corporate Social Responsibility and Women's Empowerment at the UN Global Compact"
"Segregation and the Spatial Distribution of Violence in the Northern Ireland Conflict”
"Still Dying to Win: The Coercive Logic of Suicide Attacks against Autocracies”
"Practicing Nationalism in Historical Writing: Japan’s Changing Image in Official Chinese Historical Narratives, 1950s to 1990s"
"Mark the Earth with Ruin: Official Memory and Memorialization in Post-Genocide Cambodia and Rwanda"
"Clientelism and Programmatic Politics: The Political Economy of Export Taxes in Argentina"
"An Open Book?: A Look at How Democratic Security-Seekers Signal their Intentions"
"Globalization and the Convergence of Power"

M.A. with Specialization

Students may apply for a second year of study, the M.A. with specialization. This second year requires an additional three quarters of residence during which the student takes an additional nine courses. Students apply for the second year with specialization during their first year in residence.

Joint and Dual Degrees

The joint degree program with the Chicago Booth School of Business is administered through the Division of the Social Sciences. Students pursuing a joint degree must fulfill all the requirements of the CIR degree in addition to the requirements of the respective professional degree, though there are some exceptions. Students enrolled in the dual J.D. /M.A. program with the Law School take nine courses in their fourth year of study, three of which are typically law-school courses; the remaining six come from the CIR list of approved courses. Students enrolled in the joint M.B.A/M.A. program take a reduced course load of 14 courses in the Booth School of Business and the full nine courses in CIR. Students interested in the dual M.A./M.A. degree program should contact the Harris School of Public Policy for more information.

Admission

CIR applicants must meet the formal requirements of the Graduate Social Sciences Division.

With one exception, applicants are no longer required to submit Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores.  Applicants to the joint CIR and Booth School of Business degree program must submit either GRE or Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) scores.

All financial aid is merit-based, and CIR offers tuition scholarships at the time of admission.

Applicants from non-English speaking countries must provide evidence of English proficiency by submitting scores from either the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS).

Some non-native English speakers are exempt, if they have studied in an English language University. Please contact our Dean of Students Office with any questions: ssd-admissions@uchicago.edu

How to Apply

The Application for Admission and Financial Aid, with instructions and deadlines, is available online at: https://apply-ssd.uchicago.edu/apply/.

Applicants interested in the dual J.D./M.A. program must apply separately to both the Law School and the Committee on International Relations. Applicants interested in the joint M.B.A./M.A. program must submit their application to The University of Chicago Booth School of Business, which then refers the application to CIR. Please contact the Harris School of Public Policy regarding the application procedure for the dual M.A./M.A. degree.
For additional information about our program, please contact E.G. Enbar, our Student Affairs Administrator, at 773-702-8312 oregenbar@uchicago.edu.
Please also visit our website, at: https://cir.uchicago.edu/

Further Information

Additional program information may be found at the Committee's website, http://cir.uchicago.edu/. You can contact E.G. Enbar, Student Affairs Administrator, at (773) 702-8312 or egenbar@uchicago.edu.

International Relations Courses

INRE 30000. Perspectives on International Relations. 000 Units.

This required, non-credit course is designed to introduce students to the craft of research in International Relations. For the first half of Autumn quarter, the full cohort will meet for lectures on two central themes: (i) the fundamental aspects of conducting research in the social sciences, and, specifically, in International Relations; and (ii) preparation of the MA thesis proposal. Then, the three preceptor student groups will meet for workshops over the latter half of the quarter. The purpose of the workshops is to give each student the opportunity to present his or her proposal draft.

Instructor(s): Paul Staniland     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Open only to CIR students.

INRE 30600. Constructing a Society of Human Rights: A Psychological Framework. 100 Units.

This course is designed to discuss the ways that cultural and social psychology contribute to understandings about human rights conceptually, and how human rights issues emerge from social dynamics. Over the course of the quarter, students will learn about theories on intergroup conflict and prejudice, how an individual's beliefs emerge from social contexts and shape their relationships with others, how obedience to authority is created and abused, and how social positioning and narratives influence conceptions of self and other. We will also discuss the relevance and impact of psychological study and data on human rights issues.

Equivalent Course(s): HMRT 25220, PBPL 25220, CHDV 25220

INRE 30960. Geopolitical Forecasting. 100 Units.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the practices entailed in high-performance geopolitical event forecasting, with an eye to both intellectual and professional applications. It will survey a number of cornerstone academic works drawn from the fields of psychology, political science, economics, and decision science in pursuit of a rigorous understanding of the difficulties entailed in accurately predicting important geopolitical events. It will also allow students to gain hands-on experience in making effective forecasts themselves.

Instructor(s): Reese, Michael J     Terms Offered: Spring

INRE 31602. Human Rights: Philosophical Foundations. 100 Units.

In this class we explore the philosophical foundations of human rights, investigating theories of how our shared humanity in the context of an interdependent world gives rise to obligations of justice. Webegin by asking what rights are, how they are distinguished from other part of morality, and what role they play in our social and political life. But rights come in many varieties, and we are interested in human rights in particular. In later weeks, we will ask what makes something a human right, and how are human rights different from other kinds of rights. We will consider a number of contemporary philosophers (and one historian) who attempt to answer this question, including James Griffin, Joseph Raz, John Rawls, John Tasioulas, Samuel Moyn, Jiewuh Song, and Martha Nussbaum. Throughout we will be asking questions such as, "What makes something a human right?" "What role does human dignity play in grounding our human rights?" "Are human rights historical?" "What role does the nation and the individual play in our account of human rights?" "When can one nation legitimately intervene in the affairs of another nation?" "How can we respect the demands of justice while also respecting cultural difference?" "How do human rights relate to global inequality and markets?" (A) (I)

Instructor(s): B. Laurence     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): MAPH 42002, HIST 29319, HIST 39319, LLSO 21002, HMRT 21002, PHIL 21002, HMRT 31002, PHIL 31002

INRE 31700. Human Rights: History and Theory. 100 Units.

This course is concerned with the theory and the historical evolution of the modern human rights regime. It discusses the emergence of a modern "human rights" culture as a product of the formation and expansion of the system of nation-states and the concurrent rise of value-driven social mobilizations. It proceeds to discuss human rights in two prevailing modalities. First, it explores rights as protection of the body and personhood and the modern, Western notion of individualism. Second, it inquires into rights as they affect groups (e.g., ethnicities and, potentially, transnational corporations) or states.

Instructor(s): Savitri Kunze, Pozen Center for Human Rights Social Science Teaching Fellow     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): LLSO 27100, HIST 39302, CRES 29302, HMRT 20200, HIST 29302, HMRT 30200

INRE 32002. Hacking for Defense. 100 Units.

The innovation toolkit (lean startup, human-centered design, prototyping) was developed to create new value under conditions of intense uncertainty. Typically, courses on innovation focus that effort on new venture creation, but our large institutions--both public and private--wield tremendous influence and power. We believe those organizations should be more responsive to changing conditions and that they deserve commitment from the best and brightest when it comes to the application of innovation. All institutions within the Department of Defense and Intelligence Communities (DoD/IC) are large, complex, and as impactful on society as any that one can identify. They face intense pressure to adapt their missions to changing constituencies, evolving geopolitical demands, technology revolutions, social norms, and complex regulations. This course aims to train students in how to apply the innovation toolkit to such organizations and their challenges.

Equivalent Course(s): PPHA 33830

INRE 32100. Civil-Military Relations and the Politics of Militaries. 100 Units.

How do we define a military? What is a military's purpose? How have militaries around the world embedded themselves into the social and institutional fabric of the state? How do military leaders act compared to their civilian counterparts when placed in similar political roles? This seminar will help students answer the aforementioned questions by introducing them to the literature on civil-military relations. The general structure of the class readings will focus on two primary themes. The first half of the course will introduce students to long-standing debates over the role of politicization in military organizations and whether such trends are desirable or not. The latter half of the class will focus on research that analyzes the militarization of politics and how such trends might subvert traditional notions of the military profession. This course is intended for CIR students and all course assignments will be structured around helping students complete the writing of their MA theses. Non-CIR students should contact the instructor directly about taking the class.

Instructor(s): Kevin Weng     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): CIR students only.

INRE 33000. Ethics in International Relations. 100 Units.

Ethical questions pervade international politics. Do affluent states have an obligation to make economic sacrifices to mitigate the progression of global warming? Are human rights universal? Should states waive the intellectual property rights of pharmaceutical companies to enable global access to vaccines? Can military intervention be justified despite its breach of sovereignty? Despite the frequent invocation of normative language in global politics, scholars of international relations have only recently started to turn their attention toward studying ethics as an important political phenomenon. This marks a shift away from considering ethics as epiphenomena to interests and power. This seminar explores the role of ethics in international relations, both in theory and in practice. It draws on readings from normative international relations theory and political philosophy to take up ethical dilemmas encountered in world affairs in the context of debates about the environment, humanitarian intervention, nuclear weapons, development, and global health.

Instructor(s): Turco, Linnea     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Open to undergraduates with instructor consent
Equivalent Course(s): PLSC 33002, PLSC 23002

INRE 34600. Case Study Methods. 100 Units.

How do social scientists utilize case studies as a method for identifying causal relationships? What are the epistemological assumptions that underlie the use of case studies? How similar or different are these assumptions from those of large-N and other quantitative methodologies? What are some of the limitations of case study research? This seminar will help students address the aforementioned questions by introducing them to ongoing methodological debates within the social sciences surrounding the use of single and comparative case studies. The course is organized according to a "snowball method" of first cementing a baseline understanding of certain individual lessons (e.g. single case selection) before gradually proceeding to larger themes (e.g. comparative case studies) that incorporate and reinforce the lessons learned from previous weeks.

Instructor(s): Kevin Weng     Terms Offered: Spring Winter
Note(s): CIR students only!

INRE 34700. Academic Presentation in International Relations & Thesis Preparation. 100 Units.

This class will provide instruction in the norms of publicly presenting one's research in front of an academic audience. Using examples drawn from the literature on International Relations and Comparative Politics, students will learn about the typical practices of structuring a research project for academic consumption. Specific topics will include: addressing alternative hypotheses, formulating a literature review, addressing missing data issues and selection bias, formulating an empirical puzzle, tenets of constructive criticism, etc. At certain intervals in the course, students will present their own work-in-progress research to the class body where they will be expected to utilize the lessons from previous sessions.

Instructor(s): K. Weng     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This course is intended for CIR students in the final stages of writing their Master's Thesis. Non-CIR students should contact the instructor if they wish to attend the class.

INRE 34800. Historical Processes of State Formation. 100 Units.

How did states come into being? How do we assess "state-ness" or the "strength" of state institutions? Why did nation-states become the primary actor in the international system instead of alternative forms of political organization such as empires, city-states, or city-leagues? What explains variations in the institutional makeups of states? This course helps students formulate an initial set of answers to the previous set of questions by providing an overview of the state-formation literature. Specifically, the class will cover theories that address how states come into being, organize their societies, extract resources, and structure their political institutions. Course readings will initially start with an introduction to varying conceptualizations of the state before moving onto a discussion of how to operationalize and measure degrees of "state-ness". The remaining course readings will explore themes surrounding war, colonialism, civil society, taxation, economic development, & (ultimately) state breakdown.

Instructor(s): K. Weng     Terms Offered: Winter

INRE 34900. Comparative State Formation. 100 Units.

The course introduces students to the seminal arguments and ideas on the origins and long-term evolution of nation-states around the world. The syllabus is organized around the most salient debates in the literature. For example, wars and state-building, domestic conflict and institutions, integration to world capitalism, the natural resource curse, social resistance, nationalism, etc. Throughout these topics, the readings allow inter-region and within-region comparisons. Students will discuss seminal publications that provide the basis for contemporary debates on state formation, without privileging any particular research approach or community of scholars. The syllabus draws from major publications across the social sciences, especially political science, economics, and sociology. In this way, the course provides an opportunity for graduate and undergraduate students to discuss and collectively dissect arguments based on different theoretical perspectives, cultivating critical thinking skills.

Instructor(s): Cabal, Manuel      Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): INRE 24900, PLSC 24910

INRE 34950. Latin American Political Development. 100 Units.

The course introduces students to classic and recent theories on the evolution of political institutions in Latin American countries. Why did Latin American countries build weaker states than Europe and the US? What countries of the region are more developed and why? Why is Latin America the most unequal region in the world? Why have the democracies of the region been historically so vulnerable and ephemeral? Where and why did ethnic conflict appeared in the past decades? We will understand, evaluate, and discuss the seminal arguments and ideas on the origins and long-term evolution of Latin American nations. The course is of interest to students focused on economic development and international security, as the "state" and its capabilities have major consequences for the economic trajectory of nations and for the ability to guarantee peace within their territories. The syllabus is organized around major topics on comparative politics, such as colonial legacies, trade-led state-building, federalism, party systems, revolutions, industrialization, democratization, and ethnicity and citizenship. Through these topics, the students will learn about the political institutions of a variety of countries in the region from a historical perspective. Students will also be able to compare different theoretical approaches across the social sciences, especially political science, sociology, and political economy. The course is specially designed to practice academic skills for master-level

Instructor(s): Cabal, Manuel     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): PLSC 24950

INRE 36001. Society, Politics and Security in Israel. 100 Units.

This graduate course examines Israel's unique DNA through a thorough examination of its history, society, politics and security challenges. We shall explore these traits as manifested in the defining chapters of Israel's history, since the early stages of the Zionist driven immigration of Jews to the Holy Land, through the establishment of the Jewish State in 1948, until present time. Students will work with primary sources, diverse theoretical perspectives, and rich historiographical material to better understand the Israeli experience, through domestic, regional and international perspectives. Particular attention will be given to the emergence of the Israeli vibrant society and functioning democracy in the background of continuous conflict and wars. The course will explore topics such as: How Israel reconciles between the imperatives and narratives of democracy and Jewishness, between collective ethos and heterogeneous tribalism, and between protracted security challenges and resilience. We will also discuss the multifaceted aspects of the changing Israeli security doctrine and practice, in light of regional threats and international involvement.

Instructor(s): M. Elran     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): PBPL 28139, JWSC 28139

INRE 37000. Latin American Political Development. 100 Units.

The course introduces students to classic and recent theories on the evolution of political institutions in Latin American countries. The syllabus is organized around major topics on comparative politics, such as colonial legacies, trade-led state-building, federalism, party systems, revolutions, industrialization, democratization, and ethnicity and citizenship. Through these topics, the students will learn about the political institutions of a variety of countries in the region from a historical perspective. Students will also be able to compare different theoretical approaches across the social sciences, especially political science, sociology, and economics. The course provides an opportunity for graduate and undergraduate students to discuss and collectively dissect major ideas in comparative politics, cultivate the ability to think theoretically about political phenomena, and critically assess social sciences research.

Instructor(s): Cabal, Manuel     Terms Offered: TBD

INRE 39650. Transnational Organized Crime: Contemporary Issues. 100 Units.

This course delves into global impacts of transnational organized criminal networks on political, social, and economic outcomes. Students will grapple with the successes and failures of international and state approaches to combating transnational organized crime, and will examine the ways in which international organizations, governments, and communities interact with transnational criminal groups and illicit markets. The goal of this course is to provide students with an understanding of contemporary issues of TOC (drug trafficking, cybercrime, human trafficking, migrant smuggling, arms trafficking, illicit trade in wildlife and non-renewable resources, etc.), and challenge them to take a forward-looking approach to analyzing criminal markets and identifying emerging trends.

Instructor(s): Tinti, Peter      Terms Offered: Winter

INRE 39900. What Was Multilateralism? 100 Units.

A foundational institution of modern international relations, multilateralism has been "in crisis" since its emergence in the 19th century. As a practice for reordering international relations, it has failed to universalize its normative goal of equivalence among states. Why? The "no universalism" school proliferates the study of functional alternatives to multilateralism, including the rise of networked bilateralism and the (re-)turn to informal coordination among the few under the guise of inclusive conference diplomacy. The "no equivalence" school narrates the failure of multilateralism as a revival and path-dependent evolution of its imperialist predecessor. We will explore how each school developed based on a close reading of bedrock social theory and the speech of practitioners. The goal of the course is to appreciate how multilateralism's crisis is endemic for structural reasons. In addition to the usual accoutrements, students will write in one of three public-facing formats: encyclopedia entry, syllabus, or op-ed blog post.

Instructor(s): Staisch, Matthias     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Open to undergraduates with instructor consent
Equivalent Course(s): PLSC 29901, PLSC 39901

INRE 40801. Seminar on the International Politics of Asia. 100 Units.

This seminar is a graduate-level survey of the contemporary cross-national politics of Asia. It centers the perspectives brought to bear on these issues by the state and society of modern India. The course covers four overarching areas of scholarship: (1) statebuilding and its associated practices of national identity construction; (2) civil-military relations; (3) intrastate conflict and contentious politics including human rights and the rule of law; (4) the political economy of development and environmental sustainability since liberalization; and (5) regional geopolitical and geoeconomic competition. This survey is offered distinctly from, but as a pre-requisite for, participation in CIR's March 2020 Asian International Relations Seminar in Mumbai and Delhi. The course emphatically welcomes all students with a substantive interest in the region's politics, regardless of their ability to join us for this subsequent trip.

Instructor(s): Michael Reese, Matthias Staisch     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Open to CIR students and all others with instructors' consent

INRE 41500. MA Research Methods. 000 Units.

This in-person course will foster the development of the students' scholarship through regular interaction with their preceptors. In this course, students will work with preceptors to both synthesize the individualized coursework into a cohesive curriculum and to plan and execute the MA thesis, from choosing research questions, selecting an appropriate research design, elaborating their chosen methodology, conducting research, and writing up their results.

Instructor(s): John Hansen, Michael Albertus, James Evans     Terms Offered: Autumn Spring Winter
Equivalent Course(s): CMES 41500, MAPS 41500, MACS 41500

INRE 42000. Writing about Complex Issues. 100 Units.

This course will challenge students to engage critical questions of human security in the context of three contemporary case studies that have come to represent "policy quagmires" at the international level: international stabilization efforts in the Sahel region of Africa; the US-led "War on Drugs" in Latin America and the Caribbean; and the migration "crisis" in Europe. Students will be required to think critically about existing policy approaches pursued by various actors in these settings. Drawing from a range of sources and disciplines, students will learn how to analyze these issues, write persuasively in a variety of formats, and come away better equipped to research and write about other complex international crises. In all three case studies, the prevailing development-security nexus, promoted and financed by the international community and national governments, has proved insufficient as a framework for meeting respective challenges. Meanwhile, non-state actors, including criminal networks, armed groups, civil society organizations, NGOs, and humanitarian agencies compete and collaborate with state actors and each other to shape security and governance outcomes according to their own interests and ideologies. Students will submit written assignments on each of the three case studies. A key component of this course will be editing and analyzing the work of their peers.

Instructor(s): Tinti, Peter     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Open to undergraduates with instructor consent

INRE 43000. Core Seminar: International Order and Security. 100 Units.

This seminar is a graduate-level course on international order and security, with a focus on the pragmatic intersections between scholarship and real-time policy-applicable forecasting. The central objective will be to help students develop the skills to relate the empirical world to the theoretical, developing skills that will contribute to useful and appropriate independent research. By the end of this part of the core sequence, students will be able to (1) formulate compelling research questions in the study of anarchic political systems; (2) center their investigations on well-specified alternative explanatory accounts drawn from a focused consideration of the existing literature; and (3) link social scientific theories of politics to their multifaceted empirical implications.

Instructor(s): Reese, M.J.     Terms Offered: Autumn Winter
Note(s): Open only to CIR students

INRE 43100. Core Seminar: Global Governance, Rights, and Norms. 100 Units.

TBD

Terms Offered: Autumn

INRE 43200. Core Seminar: Global Governance, Rights, and Norms. 100 Units.

TBD

Instructor(s): Turco, Linnea     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Open only to CIR students

INRE 43800. Core Seminar: International Political Economy. 100 Units.

This seminar is a graduate-level survey of international political economy (IPE). It addresses three prominent questions: (1) How do governments coordinate to regulate the cross-border flow of goods, services, and capital? In particular, what are the relative merits of relying on decentralized, or market-based institutions, as opposed to centralized, or state-based ones, for doing so? (2) What are the distributional implications of these coordinating devices? Specifically, what kind of cleavages constitute the distributional struggles that characterize today's global economy? (3) Why are the systems of international exchange prone to periodic crisis, and how do governments seek to restore stability, and insure against future volatility? By the end of this part of the core sequence, students will be able to (1) critically evaluate competing (empirical) measurements of the key concepts which constitute theoretical propositions in IPE; and (2) craft a research design that adequately matches a theoretical claim in IPE with relevant empirical data.

Instructor(s): M. Staisch     Terms Offered: Autumn,Winter
Note(s): Open only to CIR students

INRE 43801. Seminar on the International Politics of Asia. 100 Units.

This seminar is a graduate-level survey of the contemporary cross-national politics of Asia. It centers the perspectives brought to bear on these issues by the state and society of modern India. The course covers four overarching areas of scholarship: (1) statebuilding and its associated practices of national identity construction; (2) civil-military relations; (3) intrastate conflict and contentious politics including human rights and the rule of law; (4) the political economy of development and environmental sustainability since liberalization; and (5) regional geopolitical and geoeconomic competition. This survey is offered distinctly from, but as a pre-requisite for, participation in CIR's March 2020 Asian International Relations Seminar in Mumbai and Delhi. The course emphatically welcomes all students with a substantive interest in the region's politics, regardless of their ability to join us for this subsequent trip.

Instructor(s): M. Reese, M. Staisch     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Open to CIR students and all others with instructors' consent

INRE 46500. MA Thesis Workshop. 000 Units.

This required, non-credit course is designed to continue the preceptor-group collaboration established in Autumn's Perspectives (INRE 30000). The purpose of the workshop is to give each student the opportunity to present his or her thesis research as it develops during their first year in the CIR program. Must be taken in each of Winter and Spring quarters.

Terms Offered: Spring

INRE 49700. Reading/Research: International Relations. 100 Units.

This course allows students the opportunity to receive course-credit for their thesis research. It may only be taken once.

Instructor(s): P. Staniland     Terms Offered: Autumn Spring Winter
Prerequisite(s): Open only to 1st year CIR students