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Department of the Visual Arts

This is an archived copy of the 2012-13 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://catalogs.uchicago.edu.

Chair

  • Jessica Stockholder, Professor

Professors

  • Charles Cohen, Art History
  • Elizabeth Helsinger, English, Art History
  • Laura Letinsky, Cinema and Media Studies
  • Jessica Stockholder

Associate Professors

  • Matthew Jesse Jackson, Art History
  • William Pope.L

Assistant Professors

  • Jason Salavon, Computation Institute
  • David Schutter
  • Catherine Sullivan
  • Karthik Pandian, Harper Schmidt Fellow

Professor of Practice in the Arts

  • Geof Oppenheimer

Senior Lecturer

  • Judy Hoffman, Cinema and Media Studies

Lecturers

  • Katherine Desjardins
  • Amber Ginsburg
  • Shane Huffman
  • Scott Wolniak

Affiliates

  • Bill Brown, English
  • Darby English, Art History
  • W. J. T. Mitchell, English, Art History
  • Rebecca Zorach, Art History

Associates

  • Susanne Ghez, Renaissance Society
  • Stephanie Smith, Smart Museum

Emeritus Faculty

  • Herbert George
  • Vera Klement
  • Thomas Mapp
  • Robert C. Peters

 

The Department of Visual Arts (DOVA), a department within the Humanities Division at the University of Chicago, and situated in The Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts at the University of Chicago, is proud to offer a Masters of Fine Arts.

This MFA program is distinguished in its focused attention on understanding how the pluralism of today’s art making practices relate to one another and creating conversations that bridge between DOVA and other areas of study at the University of Chicago. Our faculty  are diverse in their interests,  committed teachers who are engaged in a lively and sustained dialogue within the department, and deeply engaged with their own work.

Our students work in sculpture, photography, painting, installation, performance, video and new media. Students are admitted to the program based on the quality of the portfolio, and  the level of interest and capacity in engaging this interdisciplinary program within a university environment. The faculty focus on working with our students to develop their own work and enabling them to leave the University with the tools to support a lifetime of art making. As part of this process, the department encourages students to explore not only the artistic issues pertinent to their work, but also the theoretical, social and historical issues that intersect and bracket it.

The MFA is a two-year program (six quarters), comprised of 18 courses. Many of these course credits are earned through the development of individual work in conversation with the faculty.

First and second year students work together to articulate their work, and to sharpen their skills of critical thinking and writing. Students come to the program with diverse intellectual, cultural and artistic backgrounds and different art making practices. We all work together to articulate a common language with which to discuss and make art in this critical and supportive community.

As part of the MFA program, DOVA hosts a lively visiting artist program under the auspices of the Open Practice Committee (OPC). In addition The University of Chicago provides an enormously rich intellectual environment full of engaging lectures and workshops in all areas of study. Our students are often interested in events hosted by the Center for Gender Studies, the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture, the Mass Culture Studies Workshop, the Department of Cinema and Media Studies, and the Department of Art History. We also offer workshops that focus on professional and pedagogical issues, both in DOVA and in the Career and Placement Services Office, to assist students in preparing for a career in the arts.

Each year, DOVA supports a faculty led trip to visit museums and galleries outside of Chicago; past trips have included New York City and Beijing.  Information about our recent trip to Beijing can be found here .

 

Curriculum

MFA students register for 300 credits (three courses at 100 credits each) per quarter. A total of 1800 credits, or eighteen courses, is required for the degree.

The basic requirements for the MFA are listed below:

1. Graduate Studio Project (9 Courses / 900 Credit Hours)

Students receive course credit for time spent in their studio developing their work. As part of this requirement students will present work to faculty and students for critique regularly throughout the year. Students register for at least 100 credit hours of Graduate Studio Project (ARTV 40000) per quarter, and may register for up to 300 hours per quarter provided that they are on track for meeting their other course requirements (see Graduate Seminars and Electives).

2. Graduate Seminars (3 Courses / 300 Credit Hours)

In order to provide a core of common intellectual experience, all students are required to take three quarters of the Graduate Seminar in Visual Arts (ARTV 39200) during their first year. The content of these seminars varies with instructors, but may focus on many different issues in contemporary theory and criticism.

3. Electives (6 Courses / 600 Credit Hours)

Students are required to take six graduate-level electives. At least three of the six electives must originate in departments outside of DOVA. 

4. Thesis Presentation

In the fall quarter of the second year each student will work with a committee of two faculty members who will assist in the preparation of the thesis work. In the final quarter of the program each degree candidate presents studio work in an MFA exhibition. In addition to this exhibition, students will be expected to submit a short but focused written abstract of their work.

5. Standards Of Performance

Each graduate student must maintain high standards of engagement and achievement in studio and academic performance, including evidence of substantial growth in their work.

For additional information, please email dova@uchicago.edu  or visit our website.

 

How to Apply

The application process for admission and financial aid for all graduate programs in the Humanities is administered through the divisional Office of the Dean of Students. The Application for Admission and Financial Aid, with instructions, deadlines and department specific information is available online at: http://humanities.uchicago.edu/prospective/admissions.html .  Additional information about financial aid and the admissions process can be found on the DOVA website .

 

Visual Arts Courses

ARTV 31001. Figure Drawing: Trans/Figuration. 100 Units.

Figure drawing is an experience that engages us visually, physically, emotionally, and psychologically. This many-faceted relationship is examined through the use of a variety of traditional and experimental materials, set-ups, and drawing methods. Assignments and class critiques investigate different models of stylistic invention, ranging from realism to comic expression. This studio class includes readings, field trips, and class projects that address the human form as source for developing your own visual responses to related issues—such as identity, narrative, and social critique.

Instructor(s): K. Desjardins     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 21001

ARTV 31700. Drawing as Process. 100 Units.

Drawing is often understood as a means to an end. The drawing, since the early Renaissance, has stood as an iconic representation for how thinking works: in preparation lines are forged to flesh out form, strike propositions, or experiment in possibilities. What this has come to mean historically is that drawing is a stage looking to an inevitable greater focus in another media. Drawings will lead to final paintings, sculptures, or moving images. But, sometimes too, drawings believe in themselves to be their own economy, to be succinct and to be in their own right a finished statement. Sometimes a drawing is the only way a set of criteria can be made clear.  In this course, we will analyze the nature of drawing’s history and embrace the notion of process as a questionable thing. If drawing is a form of vitality, then why not consider it as an end? Through exercises and problems posed, drawing will be a process of understanding and a making known, while at once being a venture into a seeing through, to drawing, its primordial function, and the making of a finite work as a statement in itself.
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Instructor(s): D. Schutter     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 21700

ARTV 32000. Introduction to Sculpture. 100 Units.

This course introduces the fundamentals of sculptural practice. Building on the historical, aesthetic, and technical strategies of making and thinking about sculpture, students are directed toward the realization of 3D objects. Assignments are intended to explore materials and process so as to facilitate students' development of an idea to a completed object. Discussions and gallery visits help engender an understanding of sculpture within a societal and historical context. Visits to galleries required.

Instructor(s): G. Oppenheimer     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 22200,TAPS 28448

ARTV 32200-32202. Introduction to Painting I-II.

This studio course introduces students to the fundamental elements of painting (its language and methodologies) as they learn how to initiate and develop an individualized investigation into subject matter and meaning. This course emphasizes group critiques and discussion. Courses taught concurrently.

ARTV 32200. Introduction to Painting I. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): K. Desjardins     Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 22000

ARTV 32202. Introduction to Painting II. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): K. Desjardins     Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 22002

ARTV 32300. Sculpture. 100 Units.

This course is a continuation of ARTV 22200 and deepens the student's understanding of the interlocking relations between material, meaning, and culture. As an art form that engages with the same space as the viewer, this class takes up as challenges the eternal sculptural problems of presence, material/cultural value, and embodiment. A specific focus of this class is the relationship between the art object and the cultural environment it is situated in. Context and presentation strategies for art making within and outside of the traditional gallery context are emphasized. Slide presentations, gallery visits, and critical discussion supplement studio work time. Field trips required.

Instructor(s): G. Oppenheimer     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300 required; ARTV 22200 and/or ARTV 24550 recommended
Equivalent Course(s): TAPS 28449,ARTV 22300

ARTV 32305. Performing Tableware. 100 Units.

Performing Tableware takes the actions and objects of the table as a site of research. Through demonstrations, readings and production, tableware will be considered in the context of contemporary practices in design, sculpture, installation, and performance.  Materially rooted in ceramics, this course gives students the opportunity to highlight, interrupt or subvert the patterns associated with sitting around table. Student will engage in the full range of ceramic processes in this course. Developing projects through a process of questioning behavior and the intimate functions of objects of the table, students will extend and challenge their material knowledge. The class will provide workshops on techniques grounded in the traditions of tableware including china painting, glaze decals, and demonstrations on mold-making for slipcasting multiple objects.

Instructor(s): A. Ginsburg     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 22305

ARTV 32500. Digital Imaging. 100 Units.

This studio course introduces fundamental tools and concepts used in the production of computer-mediated artwork. Instruction includes a survey of standard digital imaging software and hardware (i.e., Photoshop, scanners, storage, printing, etc), as well as exposure to more sophisticated methods. We also view and discuss the historical precedents and current practice of media art. Using input and output hardware, students complete conceptually driven projects emphasizing personal direction while gaining core digital knowledge.

Instructor(s): J. Salavon     Terms Offered: Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 22500,CMST 28801,CMST 38801

ARTV 32502. Data and Algorithm in Art. 100 Units.

An introduction to the use of data sources and algorithmic methods in visual art, this course explores the aesthetic and theoretical possibilities of computational art-making. Focusing on the diverse and ever expanding global data-feed, we will craft custom software processes to create works investigating the visual transformation of information. Additionally, software programming may be deployed independently, without a connection to source material. While placing an emphasis on creating new work, we will also survey the history of this type of art practice.

Instructor(s): J. Salavon     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Note(s): No prior experience with programming is necessary.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 22502

ARTV 33800. Introduction to Video. 100 Units.

This course is an introduction to video making with digital cameras and nonlinear (digital) editing. Students produce a group of short works, which is contextualized by viewing and discussion of historical and contemporary video works. Video versus film, editing strategies, and appropriation are some of the subjects that are part of an ongoing conversation.  

Instructor(s): S. Wolniak     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 23800,CMST 28900,CMST 38900,TAPS 28427

ARTV 33850. Introduction to Film Production. 100 Units.

This intensive lab introduces 16mm film production, experimenting with various film stocks and basic lighting designs. The class is organized around a series of production situations with students working in crews. Each crew learns to operate and maintain the 16mm Bolex film camera and tripod, as well as Arri lights, gels, diffusion, and grip equipment. The final project is an in-camera edit.

Instructor(s): J. Hoffman     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 23850,CMST 28920,CMST 38920,TAPS 28451

ARTV 33900. Drawing. 100 Units.

This intensive multilevel studio course is dedicated to investigations of genre, technique and format in relation to subject matter and individual expression.  Guided and self-directed experiments are used to develop visual work within conceptual and thematic frameworks.  Art historical examples and contemporary strategies in 2-dimensional art are presented as models.  Students are expected to produce a body of work consisting of studies, sketches and finished projects in a range of scales and materials. Classes are dedicated to studio work, lectures, critiques and field trips.

Instructor(s): S. Wolniak     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 23900

ARTV 33904. Senior Creative Thesis Workshop. 100 Units.

This seminar will focus on how to craft a creative thesis in film or video. Works-in-progress will be screened each week, and technical and structural issues relating to the work will be explored. The workshop will also develop the written portion of the creative thesis. The class is limited to seniors from CMS and DOVA, and MAPH students working on a creative thesis.

Instructor(s): J. Hoffman     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CMST 23930; CMST 23931; departmental approval of senior creative thesis project.
Equivalent Course(s): CMST 23904,ARTV 23904

ARTV 33905. Creative Thesis Workshop. 100 Units.

This seminar will focus on how to craft a creative thesis in film or video. Works-in-progress will be screened each week, and technical and structural issues relating to the work will be explored. The workshop will also develop the written portion of the creative thesis. The class is limited to seniors from CMS and DOVA, and MAPH students working on a creative thesis.

Instructor(s): Judy Hoffman     Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter
Prerequisite(s): CMST 23930; CMST 23931 or 27600; departmental approval of senior creative thesis project.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 23905,CMST 33905

ARTV 33930. Documentary Production I. 100 Units.

This class is intended to develop skills in documentary production so that students may apply for Documentary Production II. Documentary Production I focuses on the making of independent documentary video.  Examples of various styles of documentary will be screened and discussed.  Issues embedded in the documentary genre, such as the ethics and politics of representation and the shifting lines between fact and fiction will be explored.  Pre-production methodologies, production, and post-production techniques will be taught.  Students will be expected to develop an idea for a documentary video, crews will be formed, and each crew will produce a five-minute documentary.  Students will also be expected to purchase an external hard drive.

Instructor(s): J. Hoffman     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Prior or concurrent enrollment in CMST 10100 recommended
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 23930,CMST 23930,CMST 33930,HMRT 25106,HMRT 35106

ARTV 33931. Documentary Production II. 100 Units.

This course focuses on the shaping and crafting of a nonfiction video. Students are expected to write a treatment detailing their project. Production techniques focus on the handheld camera versus tripod, interviewing and microphone placement, and lighting for the interview. Postproduction covers editing techniques and distribution strategies. Students then screen final projects in a public space.

Instructor(s): J. Hoffman
Prerequisite(s): CMST 23930/ARTV 23930
Equivalent Course(s): CMST 23931,ARTV 23931,CMST 33931

ARTV 34000. Introduction to Black and White Film Photography. 100 Units.

Photography is a familiar medium due to its ubiquitous presence in our visual world, including popular culture and personal usage. In this class, students learn technical procedures and basic skills related to the 35mm camera, black and white film, and print development. They also begin to establish criteria for artistic expression. We investigate photography in relation to its historical and social context in order to more consciously engage the photograph's communicative and expressive possibilities. Course work culminates in a portfolio of works exemplary of the student's understanding of the medium. Field trips required.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Note(s): Camera and light meter required.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 24000,CMST 27600,CMST 37600

ARTV 34201. Collage. 100 Units.

This studio course explores collage as a means for developing content and examining complex cultural and material relationships. Projects and assigned texts outline the history of collage as a dynamic art form with a strong political dimension, as well as critically addressing how it is being used today.

Instructor(s): S. Wolniak     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 24201

ARTV 34202. Art and Everyday Materials. 100 Units.

This course introduces students to the practice of employing non-traditional materials to make 2D and 3D objects. Drawing on the long history of artists who have employed everything from ephemeral to edible materials alongside more traditional media, students will engage the varied techniques and processes of using found objects to make artwork. Assignments are intended to consider every facet of artistic creation, from selection and transformation of materials to the presentation of a completed work. Discussions, readings and required museum visits will reflect on the nature of art and its relationship to life.

Instructor(s): K. Pandian     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 24202

ARTV 34210. Multi-media Studio: The Aleatoric. 100 Units.

ale·a·tor·ic: adj \ˌā-lē-ə-ˈtȯr-ik: characterized by chance or indeterminate elements. This studio course addresses how artists throughout time and across cultures have embraced chance and “randomness” as an integral part of the creative process. Through a series of studio projects, you will be challenged to explore how “official” Western aesthetic canons of taste (such as artistic skill, control, and “genius”) were brought into question through chance and aleatoric strategies, particularly during the 20th century. This opened doors to experimentation with unorthodox methodologies, exploration of the unconscious, re-consideration of so-called “outsider” art—and more. Readings, discussions, and field trips put these practices into cultural and theoretical context. Although this course employs drawing-based tools for developing ideas, you will be afforded ample room to expand beyond 2D --in to sculpture, video, installation, photography, performance and/or hybrids forms—in order to realize a clear and contemporary response to our theme as a final project.

Instructor(s): K. Desjardins     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Note(s): All media and levels welcome.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 24210

ARTV 34301. Writing for Performance. 100 Units.

This course is an exploration of select texts for performance written by performance artists primarily but not entirely operating within the context of art. Via historical context and literary technique, students read, discuss, and analyze texts by various authors spanning the history of performance art: Hugo Ball, John Cage, Richard Foreman, Carolee Schneeman, Joseph Bueys, Karen Finley, Nature Theater of Oklahoma, John Leguizamo, and create and perform their own writing. Field trips and attendance at first class are required.

Instructor(s): W. Pope.L     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 24301,TAPS 28414

ARTV 34401-34402. Photography I-II.

The goal of this course is to develop students’ investigations and explorations in photography, building on beginning level experience and basic facility with this medium. Students pursue a line of artistic inquiry by participating in a process that involves experimentation, reading, gallery visits, critiques, and discussions, but mostly by producing images. Primary emphasis is placed upon the visual articulation of the ideas of students through their work, as well as the verbal expression of their ideas in class discussions, critiques, and artist’s statements. As a vital component of articulating ideas and inquiry, students will refine their skills, e.g., black and white or color printing, medium or large format camera usage, or experimenting with light-sensitive materials. Courses taught concurrently and can be repeated as part of an ongoing, developing photographic project.

ARTV 34401. Photography I. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): S. Huffman     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300; and 24000.
Note(s): Camera and light meter required. Courses taught concurrently and can be repeated as part of an ongoing, developing photographic project.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 24401,CMST 27602,CMST 37602

ARTV 34402. Photography II. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): S. Huffman     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300; and 24000.
Note(s): Camera and light meter required. Courses taught concurrently and can be repeated as part of an ongoing, developing photographic project.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 24402,CMST 27702,CMST 37702

ARTV 34550. Shopcraft: Methods and Materials. 100 Units.

Designed as a complementary course to the DOVA sculpture sequence, Shopcraft explores the tools and techniques available to students in the wood shop. Topics covered include shop safety; the properties of woods; the planning and material selection process for sculpture, furniture, and other woodworking applications; the care and use of hand tools; and interpreting and creating scale drawings and conceptual plans. A series of small projects designed to challenge and expand students' design, drafting, and woodworking skills are assigned. In addition, students are invited to incorporate projects from sculpture classes or their individual studio practice into the course.
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Instructor(s): D. Wolf     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 24550,TAPS 27900

ARTV 35100. Nonfiction Film: Representations and Performance. 100 Units.

This course attempts to define nonfiction cinema by looking at the history of its major modes (e.g., documentary, essay, ethnographic, agitprop film), as well as personal/autobiographical and experimental works that are less easily classifiable. We explore some of the theoretical discourses that surround this most philosophical of film genres (e.g., ethics and politics of representation; shifting lines between fact and fiction, truth and reality). The relationship between the documentary and the state is examined in light of the genre's tendency to inform and instruct. We consider the tensions of filmmaking and the performative aspects in front of the lens, as well as the performance of the camera itself. Finally, we look at the ways in which distribution and television effect the production and content of nonfiction film.

Instructor(s): J. Hoffman
Equivalent Course(s): CMST 28200,ARTV 25100,CMST 38200,HMRT 25101,HMRT 35101

ARTV 35412. The Interaction of Light and Matter: Art and Science. 100 Units.

Co-taught by a physicist and an architect/designer, this experimental course exploresthe relationship between light and matter with a special focus upon low-level light.  Topics include: light phenomena as they are perceived within various environments as well as the physiological and cultural impact of light.  Instructors: Sidney Nagel, Stein-Freiler Distinguished Service Professor, Department of Physics, and Visiting Architect/Designer Jamie Carpenter of James Carpenter Design Associates, Inc. (http://www.jcdainc.com/).  This course is sponsored by the Gray Center for Arts and Inquiry and the Mellon Residential Fellowship for Arts Practice and Scholarship Program, which is supporting a long-tem experimental collaboration between Nagel and Carpenter.

Instructor(s): J. Carpenter, S. Nagel     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Open to PhD, MFA, MA, and advanced undergraduate students from a wide variety of fields by consent only. For permission, please send a paragraph describing your background and interest in the course to lbdanzig@uchicago.edu
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 25412

ARTV 36214. Working From Life. 100 Units.

This class is an multidisciplinary intensive into the ways in which artistic production is dependent on and part of larger cultural tropes. Utilizing contemporary culture as a framework, how does art form connective tissues with the worlds that happen outside of the artists studio? Visual art is a communicative form that requires subject matter and this class will investigate the myriad of ways that artists mine culturally meaningful materials, forms, and images as both subjects and as palette.  Participation in several field trips and out-of-class film screenings is required. Reference materials are drawn from a variety of disciplines.

Instructor(s): G. Oppenheimer     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 26214

ARTV 36216. Comedy Central. 100 Units.

Comedy is a serious subject and art is no laughing matter, but levity displays a type of intellegence that is both profound and nimble and must be met on it's own terms. Toward that end, this interdisciplinary seminar will investigate: the various modes through which comedy infects contemporary art, questions of form in the art of comedy, performative objects, the object of comedic performance, and the seriousness of play. A number of guest speakers from various backgrounds will lecture, lead discussions, and projects. Assignments include weekly readings, performative actions, and two short writing assignments, one on a key thinker on the subject of the comedic, the other a creative writing assignment. A final project of your choice can be a traditional research paper (10–12 pages) or a creative project with your choice of medium. Readings include selections from Friedrich Schiller's "Letters upon the Æsthetic Education of Man," Henri Bergson's "Laughter," Sigmund Freud's "Joke and Its Relation to the Unconscious," Lewis Hyde's "Trickster Makes This World," David Robbin's "Concrete Comedy," and others. Note this is not a studio class, and while we will conduct a number of exercises in class, participants are expected to be working on thier individual projects outside of class throughout the term in consultation with the instructor via office hours. Prior experience working with video is useful. An exhibition from the seminar in the form of a YouTube channel will go live at the end of the seminar. Comedy Central is produced in collaboration with the Open Practice Committee.

Instructor(s): Z. Cahill     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Note(s): Field trips and screenings are required.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 26216

ARTV 36300. Introduction to Stage Design. 100 Units.

This course explores the application of the visual and aural arts to the varied forms of design for the stage (i.e., scenic, lighting, costume, sound). We pay particular attention to the development of a cogent and well-reasoned analysis of text and an articulate use of the elements of design through a set of guided practical projects.

Instructor(s): T. Burch     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Lab fee required. This course is offered in alternate years.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 26000

ARTV 36500. History of International Cinema I: Silent Era. 100 Units.

This course introduces what was singular about the art and craft of silent film. Its general outline is chronological. We also discuss main national schools and international trends of filmmaking.

Instructor(s): J. Lastra     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Prior or concurrent enrollment in CMST 10100. Required of students majoring in Cinema and Media Studies.
Note(s): This is the first part of a two-quarter course.
Equivalent Course(s): CMST 28500,ARTH 28500,ARTH 38500,ARTV 26500,CMLT 22400,CMLT 32400,CMST 48500,ENGL 29300,ENGL 48700,MAPH 36000

ARTV 36750. Chicago Film History. 100 Units.

Students in this course screen and discuss films to consider whether there is a Chicago style of filmmaking. We trace how the city informs documentary, educational, industrial, narrative feature, and avant-garde films. If there is a Chicago style of filmmaking, one must look at the landscape of the city; and the design, politics, cultures, and labor of its people, as well as how they live their lives. The protagonists and villains in these films are the politicians and community organizers, our locations are the neighborhoods, and the set designers are Mies van der Rohe and the Chicago Housing Authority.

Instructor(s): J. Hoffman
Equivalent Course(s): CMST 21801,ARTV 26750,CMST 31801,HMRT 25104,HMRT 35104

ARTV 37200. Painting. 100 Units.

Presuming fundamental considerations, this studio course emphasizes the purposeful and sustained development of a student's visual investigation through painting, accentuating both invention and clarity of image. Requirements include group critiques and discussion.

Instructor(s): K. Desjardins, D. Schutter     Terms Offered: Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300; and 22000 or 22002
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 27200

ARTV 37910. Drawing After 1953. 100 Units.

For course description contact Art History.

Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 27610,ARTH 37610,ARTV 27910

ARTV 38204. Political Documentary Film. 100 Units.

This course explores the political documentary film, its intersection with historical and cultural events, and its opposition to Hollywood and traditional media. We will examine various documentary modes of production, from films with a social message, to advocacy and activist film, to counter-media and agit-prop. We will also consider the relationship between the filmmaker, film subject and audience, and how political documentaries are disseminated and, most importantly, part of political struggle.

Instructor(s): J. Hoffman
Equivalent Course(s): CMST 28201,ARTV 28204,CMST 38201

ARTV 39200. Graduate Seminar: ARTV. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): D. Schutter, W. Pope.L, M. J. Jackson     Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring

ARTV 40000. Graduate Studio Project. var Units.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring

ARTV 55500. Race, Media and Visual Culture. 100 Units.

For course description contact CDIN Center for Disciplinary Innovation.

Equivalent Course(s): CDIN 51300,ARTH 49309,CMLT 51500,CMST 51300,ENGL 51300