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Department of Romance Languages and Literatures

This is an archived copy of the 2012-13 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://catalogs.uchicago.edu.

Chair

  • Emilio Kourí

Professors

  • Arnold Davidson
  • Frederick A. de Armas
  • Philippe Desan
  • Emilio Kourí
  • Armando Maggi
  • Robert J. Morrissey
  • David Nirenberg
  • Larry F. Norman
  • Thomas Pavel
  • Anne Robertson
  • Mauricio Tenorio
  • Rebecca West
  • Rebecca Zorach

Associate Professors

  • Daisy Delogu
  • Daniel Desormeaux
  • Agnes Lugo-Ortiz
  • Mario Santana
  • Justin Steinberg

Assistant Professors

  • Alison James
  • Miguel Martínez
  • Alfredo César Melo
  • Rocco Rubini

Senior Lecturers

  • Nadine Di Vito, College
  • Claude Grangier, College
  • Ana María Fiuza Lima, College
  • María C. Lozada, College
  • Janet Sedlar, College
  • Veronica Vegna, College

Lecturers

  • Marie Berg, College
  • Céline Bordeaux, College
  • Irena Cajkova, College
  • Alice McLean, College
  • Mar Rosàs Tosas
  • Lidwina Van den Hout-Huijben, College

Emeritus Faculty

  • Paolo Cherchi
  • René de Costa
  • Peter F. Dembowski
  • George Haley
  • James Lawler
  • Elissa Weaver

Program

The Department of Romance Languages and Literatures offers graduate programs leading to a Ph.D. in French and Francophone Literatures, Hispanic and Luzo-Brazilian Studies, and Italian Studies, as well as in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies (REMS). These programs include the study of literary history, established and current critical methodologies, literary theory and analysis, the sociology of literature, literature and history, cultural studies, film, and foreign language acquisition and pedagogy.

The Department has developed a unique program of theoretical and practical teacher training in Romance languages and literatures. All Ph.D. students are funded with fellowships that allow them to gain teaching experience in the undergraduate language program - first as language assistants, then as autonomous lecturers. This system allows for a high degree of professional training and competitive funding, without distracting students from their graduate studies.

The Department admits applicants only for the Ph.D. degree, and does not offer a terminal M.A. program. Admitted students without a master's degree may receive an M.A. after their first year of study in the French, Italian, or Hispanic and Luzo-Brazilian program. The REMS program does not admit students without an M.A.

Students in the Department are provided opportunities to broaden their knowledge in a variety of ways. Each language program offers students several programs for study and research abroad, and the Department invites distinguished scholars and writers from the United States and abroad to lecture and to teach. The France-Chicago Center—a Franco-American research institution dedicated to fostering contact among French and American students, professors, and professionals—organizes and sponsors conferences and colloquia, provides fellowships and travel grants, funds visiting faculty members from France, and organizes lectures. The Fulbright Distinguished Chair in Modern Italian Studies enables the Department to invite a prominent visitor from Italy each year; past visiting professors have included Roberto Antonelli, Laura Barile, Gianni Celati, and Gianpiero Brunetta. Each year, the Edward Larocque Tinker Visiting Professorship in Latin American and Iberian Studies brings prominent scholars and other professionals to the University for research and teaching. We have brought poets, playwrights, novelists, and distinguished critics such as José Miguel Wisnik (Brazil), Jorge Edwards (Chile), Luciano García-Lorenzo (Spain), Javier Lasarte (Venezuela), and Anthony Stanton (México). Romance Languages and Literatures also benefits from faculty collaboration in the Department of Cinema and Media Studies, the committees on the History of Culture, Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities, and Social Thought, along with the centers for Gender and Sexuality, Latin American Studies, and Race, Politics and Culture.

Students are also encouraged to participate in and coordinate graduate workshops. Some of the current workshops include Caribbean Studies; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Latin American History; Mass Culture; Medieval Studies; Modern France and the Francophone World; Poetry and Poetics; Renaissance; and Reproduction of Race and Racial Ideologies;  among others. The Department features its own workshop on Western Mediterranean Culture.

Upon completion of the Ph.D., students have had great success in finding tenure-track positions at such institutions as Wesleyan University, The University of Pennsylvania, The University of Colorado, The University of Oregon, The State University of New York at Buffalo, Syracuse University, Victoria University of Wellington (New Zealand), and other excellent colleges and universities.

Further details regarding programs of instruction in each of the Romance languages and literatures, residency requirements, examinations, etc., can be found online at: http://rll.uchicago.edu/ .

The application process for admission and financial aid for all graduate programs in Humanities is administered through the divisional Office of the Dean of Students. The Application for Admission and Financial Aid, with instructions, deadlines and department specific information is available online at: http://humanities.uchicago.edu/prospective/admissions.html .

Questions pertaining to admission and aid should be directed to humanitiesadmissions@uchicago.edu or (773) 702-1552.

Romance Languages and Literatures - Catalan Courses

CATA 36212. Women’s Narratives: Cinema and Literature in Contemporary Catalonia. 100 Units.

This course explores some of the major trends in contemporary literary and visual production in Catalan culture through the analysis of novels, short stories, poems, graphic novels and films by women writers, artists and filmmakers. An introduction to the historical and cultural background from which women’s verbal and visual production in Catalan has emerged will be provided, as well as a discussion of the processes through which its manifestations have come into being with reference to social and cultural change. The course favors a historical, interdisciplinary and intertextual approach that facilitates interconnected readings of the texts selected for in-depth analysis. In order to enable the students to engage with the texts under study in an informed and scholarly manner, a number of theoretical approaches to narratology, feminism, social and cultural history, psychoanalysis, poststructuralism and postmodernism are also part of the course.
,
,The course is divided into three major thematic groups, and each group is represented by at least two texts. All texts have been produced in the last fifteen years, with the exception of Mercè Rodoreda’s La Plaça del Diamant/The Time of the Doves, published in 1962, which has been included because Rodoreda constitutes a crucial turning point in the history of female-authored literature in Catalan, and because of the lasting effects of her influence on younger writers.

Instructor(s): M. Lunati     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Classes will be conducted in English. All texts are available either in English or in Spanish (or both) for those students who might find it difficult to read them in the original Catalan. Films have English subtitles.
Equivalent Course(s): CATA 26212,GNSE 26212,SPAN 26212,SPAN 36212

CATA 37513. Barcelona Imagined. 100 Units.

This course will explore literary representations of the urban space of Barcelona in twentieth and twenty-first century narrative. In addition to the presence and movement of fictional characters within and beyond the city, we will examine the role of the city in autobiographical essays and personal writings of the authors studied. Theoretical perspectives (de Certeau, Lefebvre, Bruno, Grosz) will also be employed in light of the intersections of identity politics and urban space in the studied literary texts. Topics to be examined and debated include space and memory, marginality, urban planning and architecture, public and domestic space, linguistic identity, gaze, gender and sexuality, flânerie, homelessness, and dystopia. Authors studied may include Mercè Rodoreda, Montserrat Roig, Eduardo Mendoza, Carmen Laforet, Esther Tusquets, and Juan Marsé.

Instructor(s): M. McCarron     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): SPAN 27513,SPAN 37513,CATA 27513

Romance Languages and Literatures - French Courses

FREN 31501. Approches à l’analyse littéraire. 100 Units.

This course will focus on the metaliterary production of authors such as Deschamps, Boileau, Verlaine, Breton, Sartre, and Robbe-Grillet in order to see how literature has theorized and reinvented itself across time.

Instructor(s): D. Delogu     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20500 and one previous literature course taught in French.
Note(s): Taught in French.
Equivalent Course(s): FREN 21501

FREN 32100. L’historien antillais au 19e siècle: conquête d’une culture nationale. 100 Units.

Au XVIIIe siècle, un esclave à Saint-Domingue ou d’ailleurs, n’a aucun droit à la parole: on parle pour lui, de lui et sans lui. À la veille même de la première abolition de l’esclavage en France le 16 pluviôse an II (4 février 1794), une députation (un blanc, Louis-Pierre Dufaÿ, un mulâtre libre, Jean-Baptiste Mills, et un ancien esclave noir, Jean-Baptiste Belley) se présente à la Convention à Paris le 15 pluviôse an II (3 février 1794) pour faire valoir d’abord leur droit à la parole républicaine et ensuite les droits civils et politiques de leurs «concitoyens». Au XIXe siècle, peu après de la Révolution haïtienne et la Déclaration de l’Indépendance en 1804, c’est une nouvelle classe d’écrivains et d’hommes politiques haïtiens qui vont émerger sur la scène internationale avec comme première préoccupation l’aménagement d’un espace public où ils se font le porte-parole d’une Nation unique, composée en majorité d’anciens esclaves qui entendent glorifier l’histoire de leur lutte armée, défendre le principe de liberté universelle et surtout témoigner l’indépendance de leur culture. Ce séminaire se penchera précisément sur la pensée culturelle de cinq historiens antillais de l’époque dont les œuvres ont connu des sorts différents: Beaubrun Ardouin (1796-1865), Pompée Valentin (Baron de) Vastey (1781-1820), Louis-Boisrond Tonnerre (1776-1806), Thomas Madiou (1814-1884) et Joseph Saint-Rémy (1815-1858). On cherchera à explorer en profondeur les différentes prémisses qui fondent leurs travaux d’historiens et de polémistes.

Instructor(s): D. Desormeaux     Terms Offered: Autumn

FREN 32213. Feminist Theory and Counter-Cinema. 100 Units.

Feminism in Great Britain, France, and America has produced a rigorous intellectual, theoretical, and aesthetic legacy within the field of film studies. This course will explore the central debates of feminist psychoanalytic film theory (the patriarchal unconscious; Hollywood narrative; the gaze; genre; visual/female pleasure; masochism; the female spectator; resistant spectators) and criticism as we also integrate the contemporary movement of feminist historiography into our central mode of inquiry. The theoretical debates surrounding the critique of language, the question of feminine writing, cinécriture, and the female author will inform our investigation of the radical aesthetics of feminist counter cinema. Films include: Queen Christina; Orlando; Craig’s Wife; Le Bonheur; Vertigo; Hiroshima, Mon Amour; Mahogany; Salome; Fuses; Riddles of the Sphynx; Film About a Woman Who...; Jeanne Dielman; Tapage Nocturne; Sex is Comedy.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Wild     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): FREN 22213,GNSE 20208,GNSE 30308,CMST 40202

FREN 33600. Littérature et société: Flaubert et Marx. 100 Units.

Notre approche de Flaubert sera essentiellement sociologique. Trois romans seront étudiés (Madame Bovary, Un cœur simple et L’Education sentimentale) en relation directe avec des textes de Marx sur l’aliénation, la marchandise, la révolution de 1848 (Capital, Manuscripts de 1844, L’Idéologie allemande et Le 18 Brumaire de Louis Bonaparte).

Instructor(s): P. Desan     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Readings and classes conducted in French. Open to French majors and minors, and others with consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): FREN 23600

FREN 33801. Bresson Against Cinema. 100 Units.

Robert Bresson is one of the most ambitious, most enigmatic filmmakers. In an era of reflexive, ironic post-classical cinema, it sometimes seemed as though he sought to ignore film history altogether, to defy its habits and conventions – to re-invent the medium in his own terms. Yet Bresson delves deeply into questions of cinema as a mode of perception, of knowledge and belief, as a way to explore social being and singularity: the individual inextricably, often tragically bound in the transactions of modern life. In this course we will consider Bresson’s sources, his modes of narration, the relation of text and image, visual style and sound practice; we will seek to define the special mode of attention that his films command. All readings are in English.

Instructor(s): N. Steimatsky
Equivalent Course(s): CMST 23801,FREN 23801

FREN 34000. Travelling in Early Modern Times. 100 Units.

We will see how the expansion of commerce in the sixteenth century produces a new form of travel literature, an object for imagination where the Other (in reality or in fiction) helps to reflect on the cultural and moral values of Europe. We will read the primary texts of Marco Polo, Columbus, Las Casas, Sepúlveda, Mendieta, De Acosta, Rabelais, Montaigne, Jean de Léry, André Thevet. We will also read critical studies by Claude Lévi-Strauss and Tzvetan Todorov.

Instructor(s): P. Desan     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Advanced undergraduates accepted with consent of instructor.
Note(s): Most readings in French. Papers in French for French grad students and in English for others.
Equivalent Course(s): REMS 34000

FREN 34100. Nature and the Natural in the Middle Ages. 100 Units.

This course will consider medieval representations and understandings of nature and the natural in its many guises – theological, legal, allegorical, scientific, political, sexual – in order to see how the human comes to define itself in relation to the created world.

Instructor(s): D. Delogu     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20500 and one previous literature course taught in French.
Note(s): Taught in English with separate discussion session for students in French.
Equivalent Course(s): FREN 24100

FREN 34112. Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Emile ou de l'éducation. 100 Units.

In his treatise on education, Rousseau has to find a way out of a deep paradox inherent to the Enlightenment psychology: how could he account for the socialization of a human being with the conceptual resources of a solipsistic psychology? The course will consist in close readings of selected sections from Rousseau's Emile ou de l'éducation (GF Flammarion, 2009).

Instructor(s): V. Descombes     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taught in French
Equivalent Course(s): SCTH 35802,FREN 24112

FREN 35100. Comedy, Immorality and Theatricality: Molière's first grandes comédies. 100 Units.

Molière created a revolution in modern comic theater with his first three grandes comedies, five-act satirical plays that tackled the prominent social and cultural problems of the day: marriage and feminism, religion and hypocrisy, and the refined artifice of court and salon society. We will conduct close readings of L’Ecole des femmes, Tartuffe and Le Misanthrope, relating them to key currents in seventeenth-century thought and literature (Pascal, La Bruyère, La Fontaine, etc). We will also examine their theatrical dimension, working in conjunction with the preparation for a Court Theatre staging of two of the comedies.

Instructor(s): L. Norman     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This course will be bilingual (French and English), all texts will be read in French and most courses (aside from those dedicated to theatrical adaptation) conducted in French. Those taking the course in TAPS may conduct written work in English.
Equivalent Course(s): FREN 25100,REMS 35100,TAPS 28471

FREN 35301. Beautiful Souls, Adventurers, and Rogues. The European 18th Century Novel. 100 Units.

The course will examine several major eighteenth-century novels, including Manon Lescaut by Prevost, Pamela and fragments from Clarissa by Richardson, Shamela and fragments from Joseph Andrews by Fielding, Jacques le Fataliste by Diderot, and The Sufferings of Young Werther by Goethe.

Instructor(s): T. Pavel     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Not open to first-year undergraduates.
Note(s): Taught in English. A weekly session in French will be held for French majors and graduate students.
Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 24401,CMLT 34401,SCTH 38240,FREN 25301

FREN 36003. Introduction à l'autobiographie. 100 Units.

This course traces the history of the autobiographical genre in France from the eighteenth century to the present. The study of key texts will be accompanied by an introduction to some critical perspectives. We will give special emphasis to questions of reference and authenticity, identity and subject formation, and gender and the family. Authors include Rousseau, Chateaubriand, Stendhal, Colette, Perec, and Sarraute.

Instructor(s): A. James     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20500
Note(s): Taught in French.

FREN 38600. Fiction, Ideals, and Norms. 100 Units.

This course will discuss the ways in which fiction imagines a multitude of individual cases meant to incite reflection on moral practices. The topics will include: the distance between the “I” and its life, the birth of moral responsibility, and the role of affection and gratitude. We will read philosophical texts by Elisabeth Anscombe, Charles Taylor, Robert Pippin, Hans Joas, Charles Larmore, and Candace Vogler, and literary texts by Shakespeare, Balzac, Theodor Fontane, Henry James, Carson McCullers, and Sandor Marai. 

Instructor(s): T. Pavel     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): FREN 28600,CMLT 28601,CMLT 38601,SCTH 38211

FREN 39200. Edgar Quinet au carrefour de la littérature et de l’histoire. 100 Units.

Thinker, poet, historian, Edgar Quinet had a profound influence in nineteenth-century France. Very much a European, he had a deep understanding of Vico and was among the very first to introduce German thought into France. He opened new perspectives in the understanding of medieval culture as well as the French Revolution and the Empire. In this course we will study selected works of Quinet such as Ahsvérus, Merlin l’Enchanteur, Histoire de mes idées, and La Révolution, placing them in the broader context of nineteenth-century French culture.

Instructor(s): R. Morrissey     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20500 and one previous literature course taught in French.
Note(s): Readings and discussion in French (but comments in English are also welcome). Papers and student presentations in French or English depending on student's concentration.
Equivalent Course(s): FREN 29200

FREN 40212. Models of Philosophy/Religion as a Way of Life. Units.

In the first part of this course, we will examine Stoicism as a way of life through a reading of Pierre Hadot’s commentary (in French) on Epictetus’ Manual, supplemented by other writings of Hadot. The second part of the course will be devoted to the topic of Judaism as a way of life, focusing on the writings of Joseph Soloveitchik.  The third part of the course will consider a number of historically and theoretically heterogeneous essays that take up different aspects of our theme.  Depending on the interests of the seminar participants, texts for this part of the course may include the writings of Francis of Assisi, essays by Michel Foucault, Hilary Putnam, and Wittgenstein’s “Lectures on Religious Belief”. (I)

Instructor(s): A. Davidson     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Reading knowledge of French required. Limited enrollment; Students interested in taking for credit should attend 1st seminar before registering. Consent only.
Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 50511,DVPR 50211,HIJD 50211,PHIL 50211

FREN 41301. The Concept of Institution: From Modern Political Philosophical to Social Philosophy. 100 Units.

Modern political philosophy is an inquiry into the legitimacy of political authority (why should I be submitted to a Sovereign?). Social philosophy is an inquiry into the meaning of social action : what does it take for an agent to be acting socially?
,According to the French School of sociology (Durkheim, Mauss, Lévi-Strauss, Dumont), human beings are social beings insofar as their lifes are governed by collective representations and institutions. This view can be presented as a way of dealing with the paradoxes of a purely political view of social life as found in social contract theories of political sovereignty.
,First, we will assess Durkheim’s reading of Jean-Jacques Rousseau Social Contract as having anticipated the sociological understanding of social life by overcoming a purely atomistic view of political associations (with the concept of a “general will” and its foundation in the “moral” constitution of the people, i.e. its collective habits and social institutions).
,Then, we will consider contemporary proposals to locate the concept of institution within the framework of a philosophy of action (Anscombe, “On Brute Facts”; Castoriadis, The Imaginary Institution of Society).

Instructor(s): V. Descombes     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): SCTH 51301,PHIL 52201

FREN 43713. Neo-Avant-Wave: Post-War Film Experiment in France. 100 Units.

The New Wave. The Neo-Avant Garde. Rarely have these film and art movements been placed into an explicit historical or theoretical dialog or dialectic. It will be the task of this seminar to do just that. We will begin our study with a brief look into the pre-WWII situation of radical art and film movements, and classic theories of the avant-garde and neo-avant-garde. Turning our attention to the rise of Lettrism within the context of post-war film and art culture, we will subsequently evaluate the conditions that surrounded the emergence of New Wave filmmaking and criticism, and that include the Situationist International and Nouveau Réalisme. As we move toward and beyond the events of May 1968, we will bring our study of social documentary, politically militant forms, collective film and art practices, and historiography to bear on purportedly stable understandings of the New Wave, its art historical forebearers, and its heirs. Reading knowledge of French is required. While some of our texts will appear in English translation, many will not. The seminar will be conducted in English, but the last thirty minutes of each session will be conducted in French. This component is intended to improve students’ oral proficiency, but it will not be used in student evaluation. Screenings are mandatory. With some possible exceptions, films will be subtitled. Students enrolled in FREN 43713 will be required to complete all reading and writing in French.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Wild     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 43701,CMST 63701

Romance Languages and Literatures - Italian Courses

ITAL 32101. Dante's "Divine Comedy-3: Paradiso" 100 Units.

An in-depth study of the third cantica of Dante's masterpiece, considered the most difficult but in many ways also the most innovative. Read alongside his scientific treatise the Convivio and his political manifesto the Monarchia.

Instructor(s): J. Steinberg     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Completion of the previous courses in the sequence not required, but students should familiarize themselves with the Inferno and the Purgatorio before the first day of class. Taught in English.

ITAL 32900. Vico's New Science. 100 Units.

This course offers a close reading of Giambattista Vico’s masterpiece, New Science (1744) – a work that sets out to refute “all opinions hitherto held about the principles of humanity.” Vico, who is acknowledged as the most resolute scourge of any form of rationalism, breathed new life into rhetoric, imagination, poetry, metaphor, history, and philology in order to promote in his readers that originary “wonder” and “pathos” which sets human beings on the search for truth. However, Vico argues, the truths that are most available and interesting to us are the ones humanity “authored” by means of its culture and history-creating activities. For this reason the study of myth and folklore as well as archeology, anthropology, and ethnology must all play a role in the rediscovery of man. The New Science builds an “alternative philosophy” for a new age and reads like a “novel of formation” recounting the (hi)story of the entire human race and our divine ancestors. In Vico, a prophetic spirit, one recognizes the fulfillment of the Renaissance, the spokesperson of a particular Enlightenment, the precursor of the Kantian revolution, and the forefather of the philosophy of history (Herder, Hegel, and Marx). The New Science remained a strong source of inspiration in the twentieth century (Cassirer, Gadamer, Berlin, Joyce, Beckett, etc.) and may prove relevant in disclosing our own responsibilities in postmodernity.

Instructor(s): R. Rubini     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taught in English.
Equivalent Course(s): FNDL 21408,CMLT 22501,CMLT 32501,ITAL 22900

ITAL 33101. Early Italian Lyric: Dante and His Rivals. 100 Units.

This course examines Dante’s complicated relationship with other contemporary and near-contemporary lyric poets. In particular, we examine Dante’s texts as part of a dense web of contending vernacular discourses instead of as the final word or telos of our studies. For this reason, special emphasis is given to the sonnet form as a ritualized genre in which poetic communities are formed and contending philosophical, political, and sociological visions of society are constructed and deconstructed. The role of books and manuscript culture is especially important as we try to understand the material production and reception of the emergent vernacular literature, and its role and function in late medieval urban Italy.

Instructor(s): J. Steinberg     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): The first hour will be dedicated to close reading of poem/s in Italian. Auditors without knowledge of Italian are welcome to arrive for the discussion after that. Interested undergraduates, please contact instructor before the first day of class.
Equivalent Course(s): ITAL 23101

ITAL 33203. Rome in Film and Literature. 100 Units.

We shall analyze films and fictional works that reflect both realities and myths about the “Eternal City,” Rome. Classical Rome will not be studied; instead the focus will be on a trajectory of works, both written and cinematic, that are set in and explore late nineteenth to late twentieth-century Rome. The goal is to analyze some of the numerous diverse representations of modern Rome that portray historical, political, subjective, and/or fantastical/mythopoetic elements that have interacted over time to produce the palimpsest that is the city of Rome. Books by D’Annunzio, Moravia, Pasolini and Malerba; films by Fellini, Visconti, Rossellini, Bertolucci, Pasolini, and Moretti.

Instructor(s): R. West     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taught in English; Italian majors will read the texts in the original Italian.
Equivalent Course(s): ITAL 23203,CMST 23202,CMST 32302

ITAL 34100. Goldoni. 100 Units.

This class is a close reading (in context) of some selected works by Carlo Goldoni, Italy’s most prominent playwright of the eighteenth century. It includes discussion of Goldoni’s so-called “reform” of Italian theater, whereby elements of Renaissance and Baroque comedy where refashioned to serve a prototypical bourgeois theater; and Goldoni’s antagonism with Carlo Gozzi, promoter of a more exotic yet old-fashioned type of comedy. In the latter part of the course we will focus on the Goldoni-Renaissance in the twentieth century, spearheaded by renowned stage director Giorgio Strehler (1921-1997).

Instructor(s): R. Rubini     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taught in Italian.
Equivalent Course(s): ITAL 24100

ITAL 34803. Outsiders I: Elsa Morante. 100 Units.

One of the most innovative and original writers of the twentieth-century Italy, Elsa Morante (1912-1985) did not enjoy canonization and full integration into the modern Italian novel tradition during her life. From the late 1940s to her death, her works stimulated numerous critical debates, but she remained fundamentally an “outsider” whose art could not find a comfortable place in the prevailing niches into which her more “insider” contemporaries were placed. In this course we shall read and analyze in detail her novels and essays, and consider the earlier and more recent critical reception of her corpus. We shall also consider her influence on subsequent writers, and the ways in which her poetics and practice interact in important ways with feminist, queer, and political theories of current interest. Given that her major novels are translated into English, the course is open to non-specialists of Italian literature, although students concentrating on Italian literature will read the original versions.

Instructor(s): R. West     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): GNSE 28601,ITAL 24803

ITAL 36600. Bruno/Campanella. 100 Units.

This course analyzes the philosophy and theology of Giordano Bruno and Tommaso Campanella, two crucial figures of European sixteenth-century culture. As philosophers, theologians, poets, and narrators, Bruno and Campanella embody the literary, religions, and philosophical syncretism of the Italian Renaissance. To study these authors necessarily entails a close analysis of Florentine Neo-Platonism, Hermetism, magic, and apocalyptism, along with the literary traditions that molded the Italian renaissance. We discuss Bruno’s Italian Dialogues, De umbris idearum (his first major treatise on artificial memory), and a selection of his later Latin poems. We then examine Campanella’s La Città del sole, most of his philosophical poems, De Antichristo, and a selection of his theological treatises.

Instructor(s): A. Maggi     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Classes conducted in English. Texts in English and the original.
Equivalent Course(s): ITAL 26600,RLIT 36600

Romance Languages and Literatures - Portuguese Courses

PORT 32500. The Travels of Fernão Mendes Pinto. 100 Units.

Most people think that pirates have no scientific interests, and that businesspeople lack literary inclinations. They also think that the sciences and the arts are powerful antidote to dubious trading practices. The Portuguese writer Fernão Mendes Pinto (c.1509-1583), however, was a committed pirate, a traveler in Asia and Africa, a dubious tradesman, an inept secret agent, an amateur anthropologist and, not least, a very great writer. The course will discuss his only book, Peregrinação (published posthumously in 1614). The book will be read in Rebecca Catz’s English translation.

Instructor(s): M. Tamen     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): No knowledge of Portuguese is required.
Equivalent Course(s): PORT 22500

PORT 35013. Plato on Poets. 100 Units.

Plato is famous among literary people, though not necessarily among philosophers, for having peppered some of his works with attacks on poets and poetry. The course will argue for a nuanced description of such attacks and for a connection between some of his arguments on poets and poetry and some of his general philosophical arguments (e.g., on knowledge). Among the topics to be discussed will be the relationship between what poets know, what poets can do, and what poets say (namely what they say they know). Of particular interest will also be the connection between Plato’s descriptions of poets and Socrates’ notions of obeying a voice, a dream or an oracle. Works to be discussed include the Apology and the Ion (in their entirety), as well as substantial sections of the Republic, Phaedo, Phaedrus and, not least, Gorgias.

Instructor(s): M. Tamen     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): No knowledge of Greek is required.
Equivalent Course(s): PORT 25013,SCTH 30612

PORT 37100. Introduction to Brazilian Culture: Essay, Fiction, Cinema, and Music. 100 Units.

During the twentieth century, literature, social thought, music and cinema were completely intertwined in Brazil. This class is an introduction to Brazilian culture through these four types of cultural production and their interaction. We will read authors such as Euclides da Cunha, Gilberto Freyre, Mario de Andrade, Clarice Lispector, and listen to samba, bossa nova, and tropicalismo.

Instructor(s): A. Melo     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): PORT 27100,CRES 37100,LACS 27105,LACS 37105

PORT 38000. Brazil and the Global South. 100 Units.

In this course, we will examine the cultural and literary relationships between Brazil and Lusophone African Countries, and Brazil and Spanish America. As most contemporary comparative studies in literature (Postcolonial Studies, Marxism, World-Systems Theory applied to Literature) have been focused on the dichotomies between colonizer/colonized, western/non-western, center/periphery, North/South, Prospero/Caliban, one question ensues: how should one account for this relationship between two “third-world,” “non-western,” “underdeveloped” countries? Would this South-South relationship be emulative or collaborative? What kind of power dynamic was engendered among those countries? We will try to answer those questions.

Instructor(s): A. Melo     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): PORT 28000,LACS 28013,LACS 38013

PORT 42101. Brazilian & Latin American Essay. 100 Units.

The essay of “national identity investigation” is a very Latin American genre. Throughout the nineteenth and twentieth century Latin American intellectuals were engaged in the nation-building project, trying to understand what would be the meaning of their national culture, employing sociological, anthropological and philosophical insights. In this class we will approach this long tradition through specific thematic clusters. On each thematic cluster, we will find writers from Spanish America and Brazil. I invite students to bridge some gaps between these two essaystic traditions of the Latin American culture, analyze their differences and similarities.

Instructor(s): A. Melo     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 42101

Romance Languages and Literatures - Renaissance and Early Modern Studies Courses

REMS 33200. Renaissance Epic: Camões, Ercilla, Tasso. 100 Units.

Due to the prestige and cultural ascendancy of its classical models, epic was considered the highest literary genre of the sixteenth-century repertoire, which forced Renaissance authors of epic poetry to explicitly compete against their illustrious predecessors and among themselves. This provides a perfect basis to study some mechanisms of textual production in Renaissance poetry, but it will also help us to raise issues around the European (and global) circulation of literary goods, cultural competition, the relation between epic, nation, and empire, or the contested place of epic among the constitutive discourses of colonialism. We will read three major Renaissance epic poems written and distributed in the same years: Alonso de Ercilla’s The Araucaniad (1569-1590), Luís de Camões’s The Lusiads (1572), and Torquato Tasso’s Jerusalem Delivered (1581).

Instructor(s): M. Martínez     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Texts will be provided in both the original languages and in English. In order to enrich the discussion, reading in the original will be encouraged for students with different language backgrounds and skills.
Equivalent Course(s): SPAN 23200,SPAN 33200

REMS 34000. Travelling in Early Modern Times. 100 Units.

We will see how the expansion of commerce in the sixteenth century produces a new form of travel literature, an object for imagination where the Other (in reality or in fiction) helps to reflect on the cultural and moral values of Europe. We will read the primary texts of Marco Polo, Columbus, Las Casas, Sepúlveda, Mendieta, De Acosta, Rabelais, Montaigne, Jean de Léry, André Thevet. We will also read critical studies by Claude Lévi-Strauss and Tzvetan Todorov.

Instructor(s): P. Desan     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Advanced undergraduates accepted with consent of instructor.
Note(s): Most readings in French. Papers in French for French grad students and in English for others.
Equivalent Course(s): FREN 34000

REMS 35100. Comedy, Immorality and Theatricality: Molière's first grandes comédies. 100 Units.

Molière created a revolution in modern comic theater with his first three grandes comedies, five-act satirical plays that tackled the prominent social and cultural problems of the day: marriage and feminism, religion and hypocrisy, and the refined artifice of court and salon society. We will conduct close readings of L’Ecole des femmes, Tartuffe and Le Misanthrope, relating them to key currents in seventeenth-century thought and literature (Pascal, La Bruyère, La Fontaine, etc). We will also examine their theatrical dimension, working in conjunction with the preparation for a Court Theatre staging of two of the comedies.

Instructor(s): L. Norman     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This course will be bilingual (French and English), all texts will be read in French and most courses (aside from those dedicated to theatrical adaptation) conducted in French. Those taking the course in TAPS may conduct written work in English.
Equivalent Course(s): FREN 25100,FREN 35100,TAPS 28471

There are currently no courses offered in this subject.

Romance Languages and Literatures - Spanish Courses

SPAN 31700. La novela histórica del presente. 100 Units.

Narratives of recovery and transmission of the historical past play a prominent role in contemporary fiction. In the case of Spanish literature —in Spanish as well as Basque, Catalan, and Galician— the attention given by novelists to the memory of the Civil War, the dictatorship, and the Transition to democracy is such that it could be argued that a new form of historical novel, a sort of “historical novel of the present” (which founds its counterpart in the “history of the present” that has emerged as a booming field among historians), has become one of the dominant modes of postmodern fictional writing. In this course we will explore this recent development in historical fiction through the works of authors like Carmen Martín Gaite, Manuel Vázquez Montalbán, Manuel Rivas, Javier Cercas, Carme Riera, Bernardo Atxaga, Jaume Cabré, Dulce Chacón, and Isaac Rosa.

Instructor(s): M. Santana     Terms Offered: Winter

SPAN 31800. Culturas populares en el mundo ibérico (siglos XVI-XVII) 100 Units.

The popular classes of early modern Europe engaged in a rich array of cultural practices, including the production and consumption of a wide variety of literary materials. In the Iberian peninsula, moreover, some of the central cultural phenomena of the period are difficult to understand without taking into account the specifically popular social distribution of their uses and appropriations. In this seminar we will explore, for instance, popular readings of the Amadís, carnivalesque discourses and practices, the complexity and multiplicity of the romancero, the development of popular print and pliegos de cordel, the theater of playwrights such as Gil Vicente, Lope de Rueda, Lope de Vega, and Cervantes, or the autobiographies of the Catalan tanner Miquel Parets and the Valencian typographer Juan Martín Cordero. In order to seriously engage in a theoretical discussion about the complex notion of popular culture, we will also read classic essays by Bakhtin, Burke, Ginzburg, De Certeau, Chartier, Gramsci, Frow, Fiske, Caro Baroja, Redondo, and Maravall.

Instructor(s): M. Martinez     Terms Offered: Winter

SPAN 31900. ¿Cuerpos Desechables? Estéticas de la No-Vida en las Literaturas Hispanoamericanas (de la Conquista al siglo XXI) 100 Units.

In this seminar we will conduct a theoretical exploration of the aesthetic procedures through which human life has been represented as expendable in Spanish-American literature from the Conquest to the twenty-first century, as well as an examination of the historical and philosophical contexts within which such figurations emerged. The course will focus on case studies that correspond to four key moments in the history of the region: conquest and colonization, slavery and the formation of national states in the nineteenth century, the triumph of a capitalist export economy at the turn of the twentieth, and the violent challenges posed by globalization and narcotráfico in the contemporary context. Among the issues and texts we may engage are Fray Bartolomé de las Casas and Francisco de Vitoria’s sixteenth-century dispute on the right of conquest and the Brevísima relación de la destrucción de las Indias, Esteban Echevarría’s El matadero, Lucio Mansilla’s Una excursión a los indios ranqueles, Juan F. Manzano’s Autobiografía de un esclavo, Manuel Zeno Gandía’s La charca, and Fernando Vallejo’s La virgen de los sicarios.

Instructor(s): A. Lugo-Ortiz     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 31900,HMRT 31901,CRES 31900

SPAN 33200. Renaissance Epic: Camões, Ercilla, Tasso. 100 Units.

Due to the prestige and cultural ascendancy of its classical models, epic was considered the highest literary genre of the sixteenth-century repertoire, which forced Renaissance authors of epic poetry to explicitly compete against their illustrious predecessors and among themselves. This provides a perfect basis to study some mechanisms of textual production in Renaissance poetry, but it will also help us to raise issues around the European (and global) circulation of literary goods, cultural competition, the relation between epic, nation, and empire, or the contested place of epic among the constitutive discourses of colonialism. We will read three major Renaissance epic poems written and distributed in the same years: Alonso de Ercilla’s The Araucaniad (1569-1590), Luís de Camões’s The Lusiads (1572), and Torquato Tasso’s Jerusalem Delivered (1581).

Instructor(s): M. Martínez     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Texts will be provided in both the original languages and in English. In order to enrich the discussion, reading in the original will be encouraged for students with different language backgrounds and skills.
Equivalent Course(s): SPAN 23200,REMS 33200

SPAN 35312. Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz: Broche de oro del Barroco hispánico. 100 Units.

La trayectoria lírica de sor Juana conforma, en conjunto, su manifiesto poético. Como no podía ser menos en una poeta de su tipo, la monja mexicana nunca se limitó a sólo reproducir los moldes existentes ni a respetar las convenciones literarias: se apropió de las tradiciones poéticas de su tiempo, dominadas por los hombres, las hizo suyas a base de sutiles variaciones y rupturas; las llevó más lejos que cualquier otro poeta contemporáneo. Después de sor Juana nadie emuló a Calderón, Quevedo o Góngora como ella; después de ella no volvió a haber gran poesía española hasta mucho tiempo después: el broche resplandeciente que cerró los siglos de oro fue, precisamente, la obra de esta poetisa americana; de ahí el título del curso.

Instructor(s): M. L. Tenorio     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): SPAN 25312,LACS 25312,LACS 35312

SPAN 36212. Women’s Narratives: Cinema and Literature in Contemporary Catalonia. 100 Units.

This course explores some of the major trends in contemporary literary and visual production in Catalan culture through the analysis of novels, short stories, poems, graphic novels and films by women writers, artists and filmmakers. An introduction to the historical and cultural background from which women’s verbal and visual production in Catalan has emerged will be provided, as well as a discussion of the processes through which its manifestations have come into being with reference to social and cultural change. The course favors a historical, interdisciplinary and intertextual approach that facilitates interconnected readings of the texts selected for in-depth analysis. In order to enable the students to engage with the texts under study in an informed and scholarly manner, a number of theoretical approaches to narratology, feminism, social and cultural history, psychoanalysis, poststructuralism and postmodernism are also part of the course.
,
,The course is divided into three major thematic groups, and each group is represented by at least two texts. All texts have been produced in the last fifteen years, with the exception of Mercè Rodoreda’s La Plaça del Diamant/The Time of the Doves, published in 1962, which has been included because Rodoreda constitutes a crucial turning point in the history of female-authored literature in Catalan, and because of the lasting effects of her influence on younger writers.

Instructor(s): M. Lunati     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Classes will be conducted in English. All texts are available either in English or in Spanish (or both) for those students who might find it difficult to read them in the original Catalan. Films have English subtitles.
Equivalent Course(s): CATA 26212,CATA 36212,GNSE 26212,SPAN 26212

SPAN 37401. Literaturas del Caribe Hispánico en el siglo XX. 100 Units.

This course will explore some key examples of the literatures of the Spanish-speaking Caribbean (Cuba, Puerto Rico, and Santo Domingo) during the twentieth century, including those of its migrant and exile communities. Questions concerning the literary elaboration of the region’s histories of slavery and colonialism, militarization, and territorial displacements will be at the center of our discussions. Among the authors we may read are Fernando Ortiz, Antonio Pedreira, Pedro Henríquez Ureña, Luis Palés Matos, Nicolás Guillén, René Marqués, Pedro Pietri, Alejo Carpentier, Ana Lydia Vega, Eduardo Lalo, and Pedro Juan Gutiérrez.

Instructor(s): A. Lugo-Ortiz     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): SPAN 27401,LACS 22713,LACS 32713

SPAN 37513. Barcelona Imagined. 100 Units.

This course will explore literary representations of the urban space of Barcelona in twentieth and twenty-first century narrative. In addition to the presence and movement of fictional characters within and beyond the city, we will examine the role of the city in autobiographical essays and personal writings of the authors studied. Theoretical perspectives (de Certeau, Lefebvre, Bruno, Grosz) will also be employed in light of the intersections of identity politics and urban space in the studied literary texts. Topics to be examined and debated include space and memory, marginality, urban planning and architecture, public and domestic space, linguistic identity, gaze, gender and sexuality, flânerie, homelessness, and dystopia. Authors studied may include Mercè Rodoreda, Montserrat Roig, Eduardo Mendoza, Carmen Laforet, Esther Tusquets, and Juan Marsé.

Instructor(s): M. McCarron     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CATA 37513,SPAN 27513,CATA 27513

There are currently no courses offered in this subject.