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Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations

This is an archived copy of the 2012-13 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://catalogs.uchicago.edu.

Chair

  • Theo P. van den Hout, Oriental Institute

Professors

  • Fred M. Donner
  • Walter T. Farber, Oriental Institute
  • Cornell Fleischer
  • McGuire Gibson, Oriental Institute
  • Norman Golb
  • Janet H. Johnson, Oriental Institute
  • Dennis G. Pardee
  • Robert K. Ritner, Oriental Institute
  • Martha T. Roth, Oriental Institute
  • Gil Stein, Oriental Institute
  • Matthew W. Stolper, Oriental Institute
  • Theo P. van den Hout, Oriental Institute
  • John E. Woods, History

Associate Professors

  • Orit Bashkin
  • Rebecca Hasselbach, Oriental Institute
  • Hakan Karateke
  • Franklin D. Lewis
  • Brian Muhs, Oriental Institute
  • Tahera Qutbuddin
  • David Schloen, Oriental Institute
  • Ada Holly Shissler
  • Christopher Woods, Oriental Institute
  • K. Aslihan Yener, Oriental Institute

Assistant Professors

  • Ahmed El Shamsy
  • Petra Goedegebuure, Oriental Institute
  • Nadine Moeller, Oriental Institute
  • Na’ama Rokem
  • Andrea Seri, Oriental Institute

Professorial Lecturer

  • Farouk Mustafa

Senior Lecturers

  • Ariela Finkelstein
  • Saeed Ghahremani

Lecturers

  • Osama Abu-Eledam
  • Kagan Arik
  • Stuart Creason
  • Muhammad Eissa
  • Noha Forster
  • Hripsime Haroutunian
  • Kay Heikkinen

Research Associates (Associate Professors)

  • W. Raymond Johnson, Oriental Institute
  • Donald S. Whitcomb, Oriental Institute

Research Associate (Assistant Professors)

  • Scott Branting

Emeritus Faculty

  • Lanny D. Bell, Oriental Institute
  • Robert D. Biggs, Oriental Institute
  • Menachem Brinker
  • John A. Brinkman, Oriental Institute
  • Richard L. Chambers
  • Miguel Civil, Oriental Institute
  • Robert Dankoff
  • Peter F. Dorman, Oriental Institute
  • Gene B. Gragg, Oriental Institute
  • Harry A. Hoffner, Oriental Institute
  • Halil Inalcik, History
  • Wadad Kadi
  • Heshmat Moayyad
  • John R. Perry
  • Jaroslav Stetkevych
  • William Sumner, Oriental Institute
  • Edward F. Wente, Oriental Institute

 

The Department

The work of the department encompasses the ancient civilizations of the Near East, Near Eastern Judaica, and the Islamic civilizations of the Middle East, including Egypt and North Africa, and the history, languages, and literatures of the modern Middle East.

The fields of study in which M.A. and Ph.D. programs are currently offered are, in the Ancient Section: Ancient Near Eastern History, Comparative Semitics, Cuneiform Studies (Assyriology, Hittitology, Sumerology), Egyptology, Hebrew Bible and the Ancient Near East, Near Eastern Art and Archaeology (Anatolian, Egyptian, Iranian, Islamic, Mesopotamian, Syro-Palestinian), Near Eastern Judaica, and Northwest Semitic Philology; and in the Medieval and Modern Section: Arabic Language and Literature, Islamic History and Civilization, Islamic Thought, Medieval Judaica and Judeo- Arabic, Modern Hebrew Language and Literature, Persian Language and Literature, and Ottoman and Turkish Studies. The department also has a joint program with Linguistics and offers courses in Armenian and Central Asian studies in collaboration with other departments at the University.

The department has two main objectives. First, it strives to provide the specific course work and training needed for its own students to develop into outstanding scholars in their chosen fields. Second, it offers more general courses that provide its own students a broader background in areas outside their specific fields while presenting students in other departments the opportunity to incorporate relevant Middle Eastern material into their own studies. The department also publishes the Journal of Near Eastern Studies, one of the leading academic journals in ancient Near Eastern and Islamic studies.

The Oriental Institute

The department is associated with the Oriental Institute, a research institute dedicated to the study of the origin and development of civilization in the ancient Near East. The Institute maintains several expeditions in the field, and research projects are carried on in its headquarters at the University. Its research archives, manuscript collection, documents from Oriental Institute excavations, and similar materials are resources for the students in the department. The department’s office is housed in the Oriental Institute building, and many of its members belong to the faculty of the Oriental Institute.

The Center for Middle Eastern Studies

The department is also associated with the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, which offers a master’s degree in Middle Eastern studies and coordinates activities at the University dealing with the Middle East in the Islamic and modern periods. Many members of the department faculty are also members of the Center’s executive committee; and the workshops, lectures, language circles, and similar activities of the Center are, like those of the Oriental Institute, a resource for the students in the department.

The Degree of Doctor of Philosophy

Students with an undergraduate degree may apply directly to the department’s Ph.D. program; a master’s degree in a related field is not prerequisite. The department does not admit students for a terminal M.A. degree, although work done in the first two years of the Ph.D. program qualifies students to receive an M.A. degree. This interim M.A. normally requires the completion of 18 courses, of which 15 must be taken for a quality grade while three may be taken on a pass/fail basis. All students must high pass one of the two required modern research language reading exams (typically French and German) before the beginning of their second year and complete an M.A. thesis in the second year.

At the end of the second year, all students are reviewed and a determination made as to whether they will be allowed to continue in the Ph.D. program. Students who do continue build upon the work used for the M.A. degree; normally the completion of additional 9-18 courses is required, depending on the field, before embarking upon research for the doctoral dissertation. Exact requirements vary by field, but all students must high pass their second modern research language reading exam before the beginning of their third year and pass a battery of comprehensive exams, usually at the end of their fourth year. A dissertation proposal of original research to be undertaken is presented to the faculty at a public hearing, usually in the fifth year; acceptance allows the student to be admitted to candidacy and to continue the research that will lead to the completed dissertation. A formal dissertation defense is required before the Ph.D. degree is awarded.

Because the department believes that firsthand knowledge and experience of the Middle East are an essential part of a student’s training, advanced students are encouraged to apply for grants to support study in a Middle Eastern country, whether for language acquisition, archaeological field work, or dissertation research.

Inquiries

Specific information about the department and its programs may be obtained from our website (http://nelc.uchicago.edu/ ) or by e-mail (ne-lc@uchicago.edu ). Within the framework outlined above, individual requirements are established for each student in consultation with the faculty adviser and the section counselor.

Application

The application process for admission and financial aid for all graduate programs in the Division of the Humanities is administered through the divisional Office of the Dean of Students. The Application for Admission and Financial Aid, with instructions, deadlines and department-specific information is available online at http://humanities.uchicago.edu/prospective/admissions.html .

Questions pertaining to admissions and aid should be directed to humanitiesadmissions@uchicago.edu or (773) 702-1552.

Foreign students must provide evidence of English proficiency by submitting scores from either the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS).

We encourage you to check our website at http://nelc.uchicago.edu/ particularly with regard to your application. The application form has a place to indicate the department/program; from the pull down menu choose Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations. For field of specialization, please be sure to enter one of the fields of study exactly as listed on NELC’s web page. We need these fields to sort information in our database. You may wish to specify your area of interest further in your statement of purpose.

Courses

Modern Languages: Language acquisition is taught at the elementary and intermediate levels in modern Arabic, Armenian, Hebrew, Kazakh, Persian, Turkish, and Uzbek with advanced level courses in Arabic and Turkish. A wide variety of literature courses are taught in the various languages.

Ancient Languages: Courses are offered in the fundamentals of Akkadian, Ancient Anatolian Languages, Egyptian, Ge’ez, Classical Hebrew, Sumerian, and Ugaritic, while more advanced courses cover specific genres of ancient texts dealing with religion, medicine, law, government, history, etc.

Near Eastern Art and Archaeology: Courses in Anatolian, Egyptian, Islamic, Mesopotamian, and Syro-Palestinian art and archaeology offer grounding in site archaeology and the material culture of the ancient Near East and include instruction on archaeological method and theory, landscape archaeology, computer applications, etc.

Near Eastern History and Civilization: A wide variety of courses cover the history, religion, law, literature (in translation), culture, and thought of the many ancient and modern civilizations of this region.

Please see the University’s Time Schedules for specific course offerings in a given quarter.

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Akkadian Courses

AKKD 30347. Middle Babylonian Texts. 100 Units.

We will work on a number of Middle Babylonian texts, including kudurrus and archival documents.

Instructor(s): A. Seri     Terms Offered: Autumn

AKKD 30353. Late Babylonia Letters. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): M. Stolper     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): AKKD 10103 or permission of instructor.

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Ancient Anatolian Languages Courses

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Arabic Courses

ARAB 30201-30202-30203. High Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic I-II-III.

This is a three course sequence in High Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic.

ARAB 30201. High Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic I. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): F. Mustafa     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): ARAB 20103 or equivalent
Note(s): Open to qualified undergraduates with consent of the instructor

ARAB 30202. High Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic II. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): F. Mustafa     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARAB 30201 or equivalent

ARAB 30203. High Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic III. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): F. Mustafa     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARAB 30202 or equivalent

ARAB 30301-30302-30303. High Intermediate Classical Arabic I-II-III.

This is a three-segment course offered in three quarters; Autumn, Winter and Spring. The main objective of the complete three segment is to develop strong pedagogical strategies in the four Arabic language skills to acquire proficiency in handling Arabic classical texts. By the end of the three quarters students should  know the distinctive features of classical Arabic texts and the various genres and sources of such texts. They will build strong command on expanded grammatical features and structural rules governing classical texts of different variations. Students will be able to produce written documents reflecting reading comprehension, personal opinions and text critique. Students should be able to make oral presentation and conduct research using electronic resources as well as traditional classical sources. The class is conducted entirely in Arabic with occasional use of English in translation and explanation of complex cultural and linguistic issues.

ARAB 30301. High Intermediate Classical Arabic I. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): M. Eissa     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): ARAB 20103 or equivalent

ARAB 30302. High Intermediate Classical Arabic II. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): M. Eissa     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARAB 30201 or equivalent

ARAB 30303. High Intermediate Classical Arabic III. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): M. Eissa     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARAB 30302 or equivalent

ARAB 30390. Arabic in Social Context. 100 Units.

Designed for the advanced student of MSA, this course aims to improve listening comprehension and instill an awareness of the social associations accompanying different speech/writing styles. Students will intensively listen to  audio /video materials  clustered around the themes of diglossia and code-switching; gendered discourse; urban-rural; class. A heavily aural course, class activities will involve student presentations (group and solo), discussion groups, and to a lesser degree, textual analysis.

Instructor(s): N. Forster     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): 3 years of Arabic or consent of instructor
Note(s): This course is open to qualified undergraduate students

ARAB 30551. History and Modern Arabic Literature. 100 Units.

The class studies historical novels and the insights historians might gain from contextualizing and analyzing them. The Arab middle classes were exposed to a variety of newspapers and literary and scientific magazines, which they read at home and in societies and clubs, during the late nineteenth century and the early twentieth. Such readers learned much about national identity, gender relations and Islamic reform from historical novels popularized in the local press.  Some of these novels were read not only by adults, but also by children, and consequently their ideas reached a very large audience. The novels’ writers paid great attention to debates concerning political theory and responded to discourses that were occurring in the public spheres of urban Middle East centers and, concurrently, appropriated and discussed themes debated among Orientalists and Western writers. The class will explore these debates as well as the connections between the novel and other genres in classical Arabic literature which modern novels hybridized and parodied.  It will survey some of the major works in the field, including historical novels by Gurji Zaydan, Farah Antun, Nikola Haddad, and Nagib Mahfuz.

Instructor(s): O. Bashkin     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Reading knowledge of Arabic (namely three years of Arabic at least) is required; students are expected to read the novels as part of their homework assignment.
Note(s): Open to qualified undergraduates

ARAB 40386. Abbasid Prose: Ibn al-Muqaffa', Jahiz, Tawhidi, Badi' al-Zaman. 100 Units.

Spanning five centuries and a vast geographical area—from 132/750 to the capture of Baghdad by the Mongols in 656/1258, and from Iran and the Central Asian lands in the East, through Iraq, Syria/Palestine and the Arabian peninsula, to Egypt in the West—the Abbasid period has been called the ‘golden age’ of Arabic prose. The writers of this period developed several original genres and directions in artistic prose, including epistles and essays, translations of world literature and unique forms of fiction, mirrors for princes and supplications to God. In this course we will read from the works of four of its preeminent practitioners: Ibn al-Muqaffaʿ, al-Jāḥiẓ, Abū Ḥayyān al-Tawḥīdī, and Badīʿ al-Zamān al-Hamadhānī, to examine its aesthetic sensibilities as well as its social, political, and religious underpinnings. We will also read some medieval literary critical material relevant to the subject. Through a close analytical reading of excerpts from the masterpieces of the Abbasid age, this class will probe the culture and contradictions of medieval Arabic society.

Instructor(s): T. Qutbuddin     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): 3 years of Arabic or instructor's permission.
Note(s): Open to qualified undergraduates.

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Aramaic Courses

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Armenian Courses

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Egyptian Courses

EGPT 30120. Introduction to Demotic. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): J. Johnson     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): EGPT 10201 and/or EGPT 20210
Equivalent Course(s): ANCM 32100

EGPT 30121. Demotic Texts. 100 Units.

Continuation of EGPT 30120

Instructor(s): R. Ritner     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): EGPT 30120 or Consent of the Instructor

There are currently no courses offered in this subject.

There are currently no courses offered in this subject.

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Hebrew Courses

HEBR 30501-30502-30503. Advanced Modern Hebrew I-II-III.

This course assumes that students have full mastery of the grammatical and lexical content at the intermediate level. However, there is a shift from a reliance on the cognitive approach to an emphasis on the expansion of various grammatical and vocabulary-related subjects. Students are introduced to sophisticated and more complex syntactic constructions, and instructed how to transform simple sentences into more complicated ones. The exercises address the creative effort on the part of the student, and the reading segments are longer and more challenging in both style and content. The language of the texts reflects the literary written medium rather than the more informal spoken style, which often dominates the introductory and intermediate texts.

HEBR 30501. Advanced Modern Hebrew I. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): STAFF     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 20503 or equivalent

HEBR 30502. Advanced Modern Hebrew II. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): STAFF     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 30501 or consent of instructor

HEBR 30503. Advanced Modern Hebrew III. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): STAFF     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 30502 or consent of instructor

HEBR 30601. Advanced Readings in Modern Hebrew I. 100 Units.

This course assumes that students have full mastery of the grammatical and lexical content at the intermediate level. However, there is a shift from a reliance on the cognitive approach to an emphasis on the expansion of various grammatical and vocabulary-related subjects. Students are introduced to sophisticated and more complex syntactic constructions, and instructed how to transform simple sentences into more complicated ones. The exercises address the creative effort on the part of the student, and the reading segments are longer and more challenging in both style and content. The language of the texts reflects the literary written medium rather than the more informal spoken style, which often dominates the introductory and intermediate texts.

Instructor(s): N. Rokem     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 20503 or equivalent

There are currently no courses offered in this subject.

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Near Eastern Art and Archaeology Courses

NEAA 30004. Archaeology of the Ancient Near East IV: Pre-Islamic Arabia. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: THIS COURSE IS NOT OFFERED AY 2012-2013
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 20004

NEAA 30006. Archaeology of the Ancient Near East-6; Egypt. 100 Units.

For course description contact NEAA.

Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 20006

NEAA 30011. Sem: Seals in Ancient Near East. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): M. Gibson     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): NEAA 20001
Note(s): Open to qualified undergraduates with instructor's consent

NEAA 30131. Problems in Mesopotamian Archaeology. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): M. Gibson     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): At least Intro to Mesopotamian Archeology AND Consent of Instructor.
Note(s): Open to qualified undergraduate students.

NEAA 30162. Topics: Mesopotamian History II: Uruk Mesopotamia and Neighboring Regions. 100 Units.

The Uruk period (4th millennium BC) saw the emergence of the earliest known state societies, urbanism, kingship, writing, and colonial network extending from Mesopotamia across the Jazira and into neighboring resource zones in the Taurus and Zagros mountains. This seminar examines Uruk Mesopotamia and neighboring regions from several perspectives – an examination of key sites in Mesopotamia and contemporaneous local late chalcolithic polities in Syria, southeast Anatolia and Iran. The seminar also considers the main theoretical issues involved in understanding inter-regional interaction in the social, economic, and political organization of this period.

Instructor(s): G. Stein     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Any introductory course in Near Eastern archaeology. Open to undergraduates with the permission of the instructor

NEAA 30801. Art, Architecture, and Identity in the Ottoman Empire. 100 Units.

Though they did not compose a “multi-cultural society” in the modern sense, the ruling elite and subjects of the vast Ottoman Empire came from a wide variety of regional, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. The dynamics of the Empire’s internal cultural diversity, as well as of its external relations with contemporary courts in Iran, Italy, and elsewhere, were continuously negotiated and renegotiated in its art and architecture. This course examines classical Ottoman architecture, arts of the book, ceramics, and textiles. Particular attention is paid to the urban transformation of Byzantine Constantinople into Ottoman Istanbul after 1453, and to the political, technical, and economic factors leading to the formation of a distinctively Ottoman visual idiom disseminated through multiple media in the sixteenth century.

Instructor(s): P. Berlekamp     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 23400,ARTH 33400,NEAA 20801

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Near Eastern History and Civilization Courses

NEHC 30401-30402-30403. Jewish History and Society I-II-III.

Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Students explore the ancient, medieval, and modern phases of Jewish culture(s) by means of documents and artifacts that illuminate the rhythms of daily life in changing economic, social, and political contexts. Texts in English.

NEHC 30401. Jewish History and Society I. 100 Units.

This section of the course concentrates on the ancient era of Jewish History and Society, beginning with the emergence of the kingdom of Israel in the tenth century B.C.E.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 20001,CRES 20001,NEHC 20401

NEHC 30402. Jewish History and Society II. 100 Units.

This section of the course concentrates on the medieval period of Jewish History and Society.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 20002,CRES 20002,NEHC 20402

NEHC 30403. Jewish History and Society III. 100 Units.

Topic: Jews in Muslim Lands. The history of Jews in Muslim lands was typically told as either as a model of a harmonious of coexistence, or, conversely, as a tale of perpetual persecution. Our class will try to read beyond these modes of analysis, by looking into particular contexts and the unique historical circumstances of a variety of Jewish communities whose members lived under Muslim rule. The class will explore the ways in which Jewish culture—namely, theology, grammar, philosophy, and literature—thrived, and was transformed, in the medieval and early modern periods, as a result of its fruitful interactions with Muslim and Arab cultures. Likewise we will study how liberal and communist Jews struggled to attain equal rights in their communities, and their understanding of various concepts of citizenship. Finally, the class will study the problems faced by Jews from Muslim lands as they immigrated to Israel in the 1950s. The class will discuss such concepts as “Sephardim,” “Mizrahim,” and “Arab-Jews,” as well as “Dhimmis” and “People of the Book” and investigate how their meaning changed in various historical contexts.

Instructor(s): O. Bashkin     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 20003,CRES 20003,NEHC 20403

NEHC 30404. Jewish Thought and Literature I: Introduction to the Hebrew Bible. 100 Units.

The course will survey all twenty-four books of the Hebrew Bible, clarify its precise relationship to the Old Testament, and introduce critical questions regarding its central and marginal figures and ideas, its literary qualities and anomalies, the history of its composition and transmission, its relation to other artifacts from the biblical period, its place in the history and society of ancient Israel, Judah and Judea, its relation to the larger culture of the ancient Near East, and the rise of canonicity and hermeneutics. Student responsibilities include primary and secondary readings, attending lectures, full participation in discussion sections, a guided visit to the Oriental Institute museum, a final exam on the lectures, and a final paper synthesizing the discussion sections.

Instructor(s): S. Chavel     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 20004,BIBL 30800,NEHC 20404,RLST 11004

NEHC 30405. Jewish Thought and Literature II: Narratives of Assimilation. 100 Units.

Topic: Narratives of Assimilation. This course offers a survey into the manifold strategies of representing the Jewish community in East Central Europe beginning from the nineteenth century to the Holocaust. Engaging the concept of liminality—of a society at the threshold of radical transformation—it will analyze Jewry facing uncertainties and challenges of the modern era and its radical changes. Students will be acquainted with problems of cultural and linguistic isolation, hybrid identity, assimilation, and cultural transmission through a wide array of genres—novel, short story, epic poem, memoir, painting, illustration, film. The course draws on both Jewish and Polish-Jewish sources; all texts are read in English translation.

Instructor(s): B. Shallcross     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 20005,FNDL 20414,NEHC 20405,SLAV 20203,SLAV 30303

NEHC 30406. Jewish Thought and Literature III: Biblical Voices in Modern Hebrew Literature. 100 Units.

The Hebrew Bible is the most important intertextual point of reference in Modern Hebrew literature, a literary tradition that begins with the (sometimes contested) claim to revive the ancient language of the Bible. In this course, we will consider the Bible as a source of vocabulary, figurative language, voice and narrative models in modern Hebrew and Jewish literature, considering the stakes and the implications of such intertextual engagement. Among the topics we will focus on: the concept of language-revival, the figure of the prophet-poet, revisions and counter-versions of key Biblical stories (including the story of creation, the binding of Isaac and the stories of King David), the Song of Songs in Modern Jewish poetry.

Instructor(s): N. Rokem     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 20006,NEHC 20406

NEHC 30568. Balkan Folklore. 100 Units.

This course is an overview of Balkan folklore from ethnographic, anthropological, historical/political, and performative perspectives. We become acquainted with folk tales, lyric and epic songs, music, and dance. The work of Milman Parry and Albert Lord, who developed their theory of oral composition through work among epic singers in the Balkans, help us understand folk tradition as a dynamic process. We also consider the function of different folklore genres in the imagining and maintenance of community and the socialization of the individual. We also experience this living tradition first hand through our visit to the classes and rehearsals of the Chicago-based ensemble "Balkanske igre."

Instructor(s): A. Ilieva     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): SOSL 26800,CMLT 23301,CMLT 33301,NEHC 20568,SOSL 36800

NEHC 30573. The Burden of History: A Nation and Its Lost Paradise. 100 Units.

This course begins by defining the nation both historically and conceptually, with attention to Romantic nationalism and its flourishing in Southeastern Europe. We then look at the narrative of original wholeness, loss, and redemption through which Balkan countries retell their Ottoman past. With the help of Freud's analysis of masochistic desire and Žižek's theory of the subject as constituted by trauma, we contemplate the national fixation on the trauma of loss and the dynamic between victimhood and sublimity. The figure of the Janissary highlights the significance of the other in the definition of the self. Some possible texts are Petar Njegoš's Mountain Wreath; Ismail Kadare's The Castle; and Anton Donchev's Time of Parting.

Instructor(s): A. Ilieva     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): SOSL 27300,CMLT 23401,CMLT 33401,NEHC 20573,SOSL 37300

NEHC 30634. North Africa, Late Antiquity-Islam. 100 Units.

Examination of topics in continuity and change from the third through ninth centuries CE, including changes in Roman, Vandalic, Byzantine, and early Islamic Africa. Topics include the waning of paganism and the respective spread and waning of Christianity, the dynamics of the seventh-century Muslim conquest and Byzantine collapse. Transformation of late antique North Africa into a component of Islamic civilization. Topography and issues of the autochthonous populations will receive some analysis. Most of the required reading will be on reserve, for there is no standard textbook. Readings in translated primary sources as well as the latest modern scholarship. Final examination and 10 page course paper.

Instructor(s): W. Kaegi     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 25701,CLAS 30200,CLCV 20200,CRES 25701,HIST 35701,NEHC 20634

NEHC 30852-30853. Seminar: Ottoman World/Suleyman I-II.

This two-quarter seminar focuses on the transformation of the Muslim Ottoman principality into an imperial entity--after the conquest of Constantinople in 1453--that laid claim to inheritance of Alexandrine, Roman/Byzantine, Mongol/Chinggisid, and Islamic models of Old World Empire at the dawn of the early modern era. Special attention is paid to the transformation of Ottoman imperialism in the reign of Sultan Süleyman the Lawgiver (1520-1566), who appeared to give the Empire its “classical” form. Topics include: the Mongol legacy; the reformulation of the relationship between political and religious institutions; mysticism and the creation of divine kingship; Muslim-Christian competition (with special reference to Spain and Italy) and the formation of early modernity; the articulation of bureaucratized hierarchy; and comparison of Muslim Ottoman, Iranian Safavid, and Christian European imperialisms. The first quarter comprises a chronological overview of major themes in Ottoman history, 1300-1600; the second quarter is divided between the examination of particular themes in comparative perspective (for example, the dissolution and recreation of religious institutions in Islamdom and Christendom) and student presentations of research for the seminar paper. In addition to seminar papers, students will be required to give an oral presentation on a designated primary or secondary source in the course of the seminar.

NEHC 30852. Seminar: Ottoman World/Suleyman I. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): C. Fleischer     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Upper level undergrads with consent only; reading knowledge of at least 1 European Language recommended
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 78201

NEHC 30853. Seminar: Ottoman World/Suleyman II. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): C. Fleischer     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): NEHC 30852
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 78202

NEHC 30891-30892. Seminar: Introduction to the Ottoman Press I-II.

This is a 2-quarter research seminar.  Part 1 may be taken independently. Course introduces students to the historical context and specific characteristics of the mass printed press (newspapers, cultural and political journals, etc.) in the Ottoman Empire in the 19th C.  We will investigate issues such as content, censorship, production, readership and distribution through secondary reading and the examination of period publications.

NEHC 30891. Seminar: Introduction to the Ottoman Press I. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): A. Shissler     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Knowledge of a relevant research language, (Ottoman Turkish, Armenian, Greek, Arabic, Ladino, French...) required.
Note(s): Open to undergraduates by permission.

NEHC 30892. Seminar: Introduction to the Ottoman Press II. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): A. Shissler     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): NEHC 30891. Knowledge of a relevant research language, (Ottoman Turkish, Armenian, Greek, Arabic, Ladino, French...) required.
Note(s): Open to undergraduates by permission.

NEHC 30901. Orality, Literature, and Popular Culture of Afghanistan and Pakistan. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): C. R. Perkins     Terms Offered: Winter 2013
Equivalent Course(s): SALC 26910,CMLT 26901,CMLT 36901,HIST 26905,HIST 36905,NEHC 20901,SALC 36901

NEHC 30996. History of Israeli-Arab Conflict. 100 Units.

This lecture course traces the development of the Arab-Israeli conflict from its nineteenth-century origins to the present day. It examines the social and ideological roots of Zionism and Palestinan Arab nationalism, the growth of Arab-Jewish hostility in Palestine during the late Ottoman and British mandate periods, the involvement of the Arab state and the great powers, the series of Arab-Israeli wars, the two intifadas, and the effects towards negotiated agreements between Israel and the Arab states and between Israel and the Palestinians.

Instructor(s): B. Wasserstein     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 25902,HIST 35902,INRE 36000,INST 25902,JWSG 25902,JWSG 35902,NEHC 20996

NEHC 46902. South Asia From the Peripheries: Afghanistan, Pakistan, and the Transnational. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): C.R. Perkins     Terms Offered: Autumn 2012
Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 46902,HIST 46601,SALC 46902

NEHC 48601. Readings in Indo-Persian Literature II. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): M. Alam, T. d'Hubert     Terms Offered: Autumn 2012
Equivalent Course(s): SALC 48601

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Near Eastern Languages Courses

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Persian Courses

PERS 30220. Poetics/Politics of Modern Iran. 100 Units.

This course is intended for those students who have learned Persian well enough to start enjoying Persian poetry in the original language. Starting from the Constitutional Revolution of 1906, each session a new poem (if not more) by a new poet will be discussed against the socio-political background of the time. The poets will include some women poets also, and the poems range in form, style and subject matter from traditional to modern, from satirical to prison poems and issues of human/women's rights. The students are expected to prepare for each session, participate actively in discussions, be ready for short presentations based on the assigned secondary literature, and write an essay. Primary texts are read and recited in Persian; secondary readings, discussions, and papers are in English.

Instructor(s): S. Ghahremani     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Knowledge of Persian and consent of instructor

PERS 30324. Masnavi of Rumi I. 100 Units.

The Masnavi of Mowlânâ Jalâl al-Din Rumi (1207-1273) constitutes the single most influential text in the Persian mystical tradition, read in the original from Bosnia to Bengal. This course will consider the literary background and achievement of the text; its poetic representation of Qur'an, hadith and mystical theosophy; its reception, commentary and translation history; and above all the structure and meaning of the poem. The first quarter will survey a select anthology of individual stories and themes in the Masnavi; while the second quarter will focus on a through-reading of at least one of the six books of this 25,000-line poem.

Instructor(s): F. Lewis     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): PERS 20103 or equivalent
Note(s): Open to Undergraduates with Consent of Instructor

PERS 30325. Masnavi of Rumi II. 100 Units.

The Masnavi of Mowlânâ Jalâl al-Din Rumi (1207-1273) constitutes the single most influential text in the Persian mystical tradition, read in the original from Bosnia to Bengal. This course will consider the literary background and achievement of the text; its poetic representation of Qur'an, hadith and mystical theosophy; its reception, commentary and translation history; and above all the structure and meaning of the poem. The first quarter will survey a select anthology of individual stories and themes in the Masnavi; while the second quarter will focus on a through-reading of at least one of the six books of this 25,000-line poem.

Instructor(s): F. Lewis     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): PERS 30324
Note(s): Open to Undergraduates with Consent of Instructor

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Sumerian Courses

There are currently no courses offered in this subject.

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Turkish Courses

TURK 30111-30112. Readings in Advanced Turkish I-II.

Gaining and improving advanced language skills in Modern Turkish through reading, writing, listening, and speaking with special emphasis on the proper usage of vocabulary and idiomatic expressions. This course is conducted in Turkish. Every meeting consists of three parts. In the first hour we work on our conversation skills: We either talk about general subjects or  debate a topic for which the students prepared in advance. In the second hour we work on a text which was translated as homework. We watch sections of a Turkish film in the third hour. I distribute a script of the part we are going to watch with blanks and the students fill in the blanks while watching the film.

TURK 30111. Readings in Advanced Turkish I. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): STAFF     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): TURK 20103 or equivalent
Note(s): Open to Undergraduates with Consent of Instructor

TURK 30112. Readings in Advanced Turkish II. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): K. Arik     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): TURK 30111 or equivalent.
Note(s): Open to Undergraduates with Consent of Instructor

TURK 40586. Advanced Ottoman Readings I. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): H. Karateke     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): TURK 30503 or equivalent
Note(s): Open to qualified undergraduate students

TURK 40589. Advanced Ottoman Historical Texts. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): C. Fleischer     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Open to qualified undergraduates with consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 58301

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Ugaritic Courses

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Uzbek Courses