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Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations

This is an archived copy of the 2012-13 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://catalogs.uchicago.edu.

http://ealc.uchicago.edu

Chair

  • Michael K. Bourdaghs

Professors

  • Michael K. Bourdaghs
  • Donald Harper
  • James Ketelaar, History
  • Edward L. Shaughnessy
  • Hung Wu, Art History
  • Judith Zeitlin

Associate Professors

  • Guy S. Alitto, History
  • Susan Burns, History
  • Kyeong Hee Choi
  • Jacob Eyferth

Assistant Professors

  • Paul Copp
  • Paola Iovene
  • Reginald Jackson
  • Hoyt Long

Senior Lecturers

  • Fangpei Cai
  • Hi Sun Kim
  • Hiroyoshi Noto
  • Youqin Wang
  • Jun Yang

Lecturers

  • Yoko Katagiri
  • Meng Li
  • Yuxiang Liu
  • Harumi Lory
  • Misa Miyachi
  • Ji Eun Kim
  • Laura Skosey

Emeritus Faculty

  • George Chih Chao Chao
  • Norma Field
  • Harry Harootunian, History
  • Ping Ti Ho, History
  • Tetsuo Najita, History
  • David T. Roy
  • Tsuen Hsuin Tsien
  • Anthony C. Yu, Divinity

Program Description

The Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations is a multidisciplinary department, with faculty specialists in history, art, philosophy, languages, linguistics, literature, and religions, that offers a program of advanced study of the traditional and modern cultures of China, Japan, and Korea. At the same time, students are encouraged to pursue their interests across traditional disciplinary lines by taking courses in other departments in the Divisions of the Social Sciences and the Humanities. 

The Department offers both MA and PhD degrees, though the MA degree is usually viewed as preparatory to doctoral studies. In other words, graduate education is primarily geared toward the PhD degree, and the Department does not have an independent Masters Degree program. Students who arrive with a master's degree will be expected to fulfill the requirement outlined for Scholastic Residence. Students interested in a terminal MA degree should contact the University of Chicago Master of Arts Program in the Humanities or the Master of Arts Program in Social Sciences .  

During the first two years, students take nine courses each year. Depending on students' interests and preparation, some of the coursework may take place outside the Department. It may also include work in language, either the primary language of study or a secondary one, whether East Asian or not, as well as in a second East Asian civilization. Many students may also wish to spend one or more years in Japan, China, Taiwan, or Korea to achieve language mastery or do research for their dissertation. Teaching opportunities for students are also available.

After the PhD qualifying exam, which consists of both an oral and written component, acceptance of a dissertation proposal admits a student to candidacy. Students are expected to write and defend dissertations that make original contributions to knowledge. The degree is conferred upon the successful defense of the completed dissertation.

Contact

Dawn Brennan, Department Coordinator

Wieboldt Hall, Room 301

1050 East 58th Street

Chicago, IL 60637

Phone: 773.702.1255

ealc@uchicago.edu

Website: ealc.uchicago.edu  

 

Information on How to Apply

The application process for admission and financial aid for all graduate programs in Humanities is administered through the divisional Office of the Dean of Students. The application for Admission and Financial Aid, with instructions, deadlines, and department specific information is available online at: http://humanities.uchicago.edu/prospective/admissions.html .

Questions pertaining to admissions and aid should be directed to humanitiesadmissions@uchicago.edu or (773) 702-1552.

Foreign students must provide evidence of English proficiency by submitting scores from either the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS).

For additional information about the East Asian Languages and Civilizations program, please see http://ealc.uchicago.edu or call (773) 702-1255.

Program Requirements

The requirements are filled in three stages: Masters Degree Requirements (for students entering with or without an MA in East Asian Studies), PhD Candidacy Requirements, and PhD Degree Requirements.

 

Master's Degree Requirements

  1. Complete 18 courses
    1. 1 course must be Directed Translation
    2. No more than 3 courses taken for an "R" or "P" grade
    3. 2 non-specialization East Asian Civilization courses
  2. No outstanding incompletes
  3. Courses or Placement at the 3rd year level of one East Asian Language.
  4.  1 M.A. thesis or 2 M.A. papers

 

PhD Candidacy Requirements

  1. 2nd East Asian Language
  2. Mastery of Languages required for primary research
  3. Proficiency in any additional languages required for research
  4. Pass PhD Qualifying Exams
  5. Defense and approval of Dissertation Proposal

 

Admission to Candidacy

Once the student has passed the dissertation proposal defense, the Department will certify that the student has met all the requirements for Admission to Candidacy (all requirements for degree with the exception of the dissertation). The Department will submit paperwork to the Office of the Dean of Student that recommends that the student be admitted to candidacy for the PhD degree. This status is sometimes known at All But Dissertation (ABD).

  1. Admission to Candidacy
  2. Defense of the Dissertation

 

Joint Ph.D. Program in East Asian Cinema

The Program in Cinema and Media Studies and the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations have formed a joint PhD program in East Asian cinema at the University of Chicago. The University has long-standing engagement with both Film and East Asian studies and has already graduated a number of scholars who are changing the field of East Asian cinema around the world. The purpose of this degree program is to provide the best possible training in the methods, languages, and cultural contexts needed to undertake original research on specific topics in East Asian cinema and media studies.

 

 

 

East Asian Languages & Civilizations - Chinese Courses

CHIN 30100-30200-30300. Advanced Modern Chinese I-II-III.

The goal of this sequence is to help students develop advanced proficiency in reading, listening, speaking, and writing. This sequence emphasizes more advanced grammatical structures. We begin with discussion in Chinese on topics relevant to modern China and then shift to authentic Chinese texts in an effort to better prepare students to deal with original Chinese source materials. Discussion in Chinese required. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week.

CHIN 30100. Advanced Modern Chinese I. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20300 or placement
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20401

CHIN 30200. Advanced Modern Chinese II. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20300 or placement
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20402

CHIN 30300. Advanced Modern Chinese III. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20300 or placement
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20403

CHIN 31100-31200-31300. Business Chinese I-II-III.

This three-quarter sequence aims at improving overall language skills and introduces business terminology. Students learn about companies and their services and/or products, the stock market, real estate market, insurance, and e-commerce. The class meets for three ninety-minute sessions a week.

CHIN 31100. Business Chinese I. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20300 or placement
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20701

CHIN 31200. Business Chinese II. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20300 or placement
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20702

CHIN 31300. Business Chinese III. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20300 or placement
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20703

CHIN 33206. Medieval Chinese Visual Cult. 100 Units.

Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 22204,ARTH 32004,CHIN 23206,EALC 23206

CHIN 41100-41200-41300. Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I-II-III.

This sequence introduces a range of influential literary works and scholarly essays on Chinese cultural and social issues from the 1920s to the 1990s. Students not only expand their vocabulary and knowledge of grammatical structures but also learn sophisticated speaking and writing skills through intensive readings and discussions. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week.

CHIN 41100. Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 30300 or placement
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20501

CHIN 41200. Fourth-Year Modern Chinese II. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 30300 or placement
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20502

CHIN 41300. Fourth-Year Modern Chinese III. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 30300 or placement
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20503

CHIN 51100-51200-51300. Fifth-Year Modern Chinese I-II-III.

This sequence is designed to prepare students for academic research and activities in a Chinese language environment. Modern classic essays, documentary film and TV broadcasts will be included among the teaching materials. Students will learn not only general listening, speaking and reading skills but also academic writing. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week. Students can arrange two additional one-on-one tutorial sessions to prepare for assigned language projects.

CHIN 51100. Fifth-Year Modern Chinese I. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 41300 or placement
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20601

CHIN 51200. Fifth-Year Modern Chinese II. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 51100 or placement
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20602

CHIN 51300. Fifth-Year Modern Chinese III. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 51200 or placement
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20603

CHIN 56500. Chin P'ing Mei-1. 100 Units.

Open to undergraduates and gradute students who do not read Chinese, although those who can do so will be expected to read the text in its original form. Paper will be required end of second course. A careful reading and discussion of this major work of traditional Chinese fiction in both the original language and in English translation, with excursions into the relevant secondary scholarship.

Instructor(s): David Roy     Terms Offered: Winter 2013
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 53500

CHIN 56600. Chin P'ing Mei-2. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Spring 2013
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 53501

East Asian Languages & Civilizations - Japanese Courses

JAPN 30100-30200-30300. Advanced Modern Japanese I-II-III.

The third year marks the end of the basic modern language study. Our goal is to help students learn to understand authentic written and spoken materials with reasonable ease. The texts are all authentic materials with some study aids. Classes conducted in Japanese. The class meets for three eighty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

JAPN 30100. Advanced Modern Japanese I. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20300 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 20401

JAPN 30200. Advanced Modern Japanese II. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20300 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 20402

JAPN 30300. Advanced Modern Japanese III. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20300 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 20403

JAPN 30800-30900-31000. Reading Scholarly Japanese I-II-III.

This course focuses on the reading of scholarly Japanese materials with the goal of enabling students to do independent research in Japanese after the course’s completion. The materials are selected from a wide range of disciplines covering the past three centuries

JAPN 30800. Reading Scholarly Japanese I. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20300 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

JAPN 30900. Reading Scholarly Japanese II. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20300 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

JAPN 31000. Reading Scholarly Japanese III. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20300 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

JAPN 34001. Love and Eros: Japanese History. 100 Units.

Equivalent Course(s): GNSE 24001,GNSE 34001,HIST 24001,HIST 34001,JAPN 24001

JAPN 34900-34901-34902. Pre-modern Japanese: Kindai Bungo I-II-III.

This course focuses on the reading of scholarly Japanese materials with the goal of enabling students to do independent research in Japanese after the course’s completion. Readings are from historical materials written in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

JAPN 34900. Pre-modern Japanese: Kindai Bungo I. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20300 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 24900

JAPN 34901. Pre-modern Japanese: Kindai Bungo II. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20300 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 24901

JAPN 34902. Pre-modern Japanese: Kindai Bungo III. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20300 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 24902

JAPN 39000. Introduction to Classical Japanese. 100 Units.

Introduction to the grammar and style of premodern Japanese through a variety of literary texts. Emphasis will be placed on extensive grammatical analysis and translation. Work with original manuscripts will also be introduced as the course progresses. 

Instructor(s): R. Jackson     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Three years modern Japanese or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 19000,EALC 19001,EALC 39001

JAPN 40500-40600-40700. Fourth-Year Modern Japanese I-II-III.

This course is intended to improve Japanese reading, speaking, writing, and listening ability to the advanced high level as measured by the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Proficiency Guidelines. Weekly assignments require students to tackle modern Japanese texts of varying length and difficulty. Organized around a range of thought-provoking themes (from brain death and organ transplants to Japanese values on work and religion), reading assignments include academic theses in psychology and anthropology, literary texts, and popular journalism. After each reading, students are encouraged to discuss the topic in class. Videos/DVDs are used to improve listening comprehension skills. There are also writing assignments. The class meets for two eighty-minute sessions a week.

JAPN 40500. Fourth-Year Modern Japanese I. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 30300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 20500

JAPN 40600. Fourth-Year Modern Japanese II. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 30300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 20600

JAPN 40700. Fourth-Year Modern Japanese III. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 30300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 20700

East Asian Languages & Civilizations - Korean Courses

KORE 30100-30200-30300. Advanced Korean I-II-III.

This course introduces a wide selection of authentic reading materials from Korean newspaper articles, college-level textbooks, and literary prose as an entry point to discuss topics and issues in Korean society, culture, and history. The primary objective is further enhancement of advanced reading comprehension, composition writing, and presentational skills. In addition, Chinese character (Hanja) lessons are incorporated into each lesson with the purpose of expanding vocabulary to the advanced level. The class meets for two eighty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

KORE 30100. Advanced Korean I. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20300 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 20401

KORE 30200. Advanced Korean II. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20300 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 20402

KORE 30300. Advanced Korean III. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20300 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 20403

KORE 42100. Korean Contemporary TV and Language. 100 Units.

KORE 42100 is a content-based language course designed to meet the needs of high-advanced level students of Korean, including international/heritage language students who have studied in Korea up to the primary school levels. We study and analyze genres of Korean TV programs on the internet (e.g., such dramas as soap operas and sitcoms, entertainment talk shows, children's shows, news programs). Main discussion topics are sociolinguistics and socio-cultural issues (e.g., speech levels, honorifics and address terms, language and gender, pragmatics and speech acts, language and nationalism).

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): KORE 30300 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 22100

KORE 42200. Contemporary Korean Society and History through Fiction and Film. 100 Units.

KORE 42200 is a content-based language course designed to meet the needs of high-advanced level students of Korean, including international/heritage language students who have studied in Korea up to the primary school levels. We analyze cultural and historical issues in contemporary Korea through four contemporary short novels and related film and media. Other goals are to foster fluency, accuracy, and comprehension in reading authentic contemporary texts, as well as advancing language skills for formal presentation, discussion, and writing.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): KORE 30300 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 22200

KORE 42300. Changing Identity of Contemporary Korean through Film and Literature. 100 Units.

KORE 42300 is a content-based language course designed to meet the needs of high-advanced level students of Korean, including international/heritage language students who have studied in Korea up to the primary school levels. In particular, we deal with how contemporary Korean society can be understood through the diverse perspectives of emergent minority groups. Topics include Korean language and identity, gender and sexuality, and Korea as a multi-ethnic society. Class activities include watching contemporary films featuring minorities in Korea. We also read essays written by minorities (e.g., Korean-Japanese, Russian-Korean) and Korean social activists. Student are encouraged to foster their own views on contemporary social issues through diverse activities of discussion, debate, presentation, and writing.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KORE 30300 or equivalent or equivalent or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 22300

East Asian Languages & Civilizations Courses

EALC 30100. Mimesis. 100 Units.

This course will examine one of the central concepts of comparative literature: mimesis (imitation). We will investigate traditional theoretical and historical debates concerning literary and visual mimesis as well as more recent discussions of its relation to non-western and colonial contexts. Readings will include Aristotle, Auerbach, Butler, Spivak, and Taussig. Students are encouraged to write final papers on their own research topics while engaging with issues discussed through the course.

Instructor(s): Tamara Chin     Terms Offered: Winter 2013
Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 39200,CMLT 30202

EALC 31851. Zhuangzi: Lit, Phil, or Something Else. 100 Units.

The early Chinese book attributed to Master Zhuang seems to be a patchwork of fables, polemical discussions, arguments, examples, riddles, and lyrical utterances. Although it has been central to the development of both religious Daoism and Buddhism, the book is alien to both traditions. This course offers a careful reading of the work with some of its early commentaries. Requirement: classical Chinese.

Instructor(s): H. Saussy
Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 31851

EALC 32501. Political and Intellectual History of China, A.D. 100-700. 100 Units.

Dynastic failures to maintain both court and local control after about 150 AD:  Local leading families during E. Han and Three Kingdoms periods, Political pressures from non-Chinese states to the north and northwest, Elite concerns that led to personal and factional power: management of political legitimation; reading, editing, and pedagogy; antiquarianism and collecting that led to reevalutations of history. Voices of interiority and selfhood: Poetic voices of entertainment and independence among leading personalities, Other voices of counter-culture and cultural hierarchies. Factions and dynastic turnover in the Jin and the South Dynasties (265-525 AD): Cultural and religious trends of this time: political implications, Social organization in northern China in this period. The nature of our sources: Collections and transmissions of texts, Texts from discovered tombs, Other sources. The Tang Dynasty as a New Military Type, 600-750 AD:  Organization of the Tang state, Tang China and the wider world. Trends in Tang-era thought: Belles lettres as social and career process, statecraft, institutions. Overview of major changes from late-Han to Tang.

Instructor(s): Howard Goodman     Terms Offered: Winter 2013
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 24403,EALC 22501

EALC 34323. The Martial Arts Tradition in Chinese Cinema. 100 Units.

This year’s course focuses on the martial arts film in Hong Kong cinema, in conjunction with a special quarter-long series on this topic at Doc Films.  We will pay particular attention to the wuxia genre, tracing the genealogy of the chivalric code in the Chinese literary and performing tradition, and examining its continuous reinvention in the films of masters like King Hu, Chang Cheh, Bruce Lee, and Tsui Hark. Recurrent issues to be examined include the representation of violence, fantasy, and nationalism; the interplay between body, film style, and technology; the performance of masculinity and femininity; and the complex interactions between the global and local in today’s trans-national film culture.

Instructor(s): J. Zeitlin     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 24323

EALC 34500. Reading Qing Documents. 100 Units.

Reading and discussion of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century historical political documents, including such forms as memorials, decrees, local gazetteers, diplomatic communications, essays, and the like.

Instructor(s): G. Alitto     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 24500,EALC 24500,HIST 34500

EALC 34626. Japanese Cultures of the Cold War: Literature, Film, Music. 100 Units.

This course is an experiment in rethinking what has conventionally been studied and taught as "postwar Japanese culture" as instances of Cold War culture. We will look at celebrated works of fiction, film, and popular music from 1945 through 1990, but instead of considering them primarily in relation to the past events of World War Two, we will try to understand them in relation to the unfolding contemporary global situation of the Cold War. Previous coursework on modern Japanese history or culture is helpful, but not required. All course readings will be in English.

Instructor(s): M. Bourdaghs     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 24626

EALC 34710. Japan and the World in 19th Century Art. 100 Units.

This seminar will explore artistic interaction between Japan and the West in the late 19th century. Topics include: changing European and American views of Japan and its art, the use of Japanese pictorial “sources” by artists such as Monet and Van Gogh, Japan's invocation by decorative arts reformers, Japanese submissions to the world’s fairs, and new forms of Japanese art made for audiences within Japan. Class sessions and a research project are designed to offer different geographical and theoretical perspectives and to provide evidence of how Japonisme appeared from late 19th-century Japanese points of view.

Instructor(s): C. Foxwell     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 24710,ARTH 34710,EALC 24710

EALC 34805. 20th Century China Local Community and Oral History. 100 Units.

After a general survey of local and oral history studies in 20th century Chinese history, students will examine secondary scholarly literature and primary documents from three ongoing local rural history research projects (a country history, a regional history and a village history).  Documents including transcripts of oral interviews and individual life histories, local gazetteers, memorials, edicts, biographies, social surveys, household registrations, essays, and recent county histories.  Some of these Chinese documents have English language translations appended.  Students will examine two oral history cases studies in detail.

Instructor(s): G. Alitto     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 24805,EALC 24805,HIST 34805

EALC 34900. The Art of Ancestral Worship. 100 Units.

For course description contact Art History.

Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 20100,ARTH 30100,EALC 24900,RLST 27600

EALC 36601. East Asian Language Acquisition in Society. 100 Units.

This course will address significant issues in teaching and learning an East Asian language through identification and analysis of specific sociolinguistic and linguistic characteristics of Korean, Japanese, and Chinese. The course will begin with the introduction of linguistic structures of the three East Asian languages to begin discussing the interaction between language acquisition and society. Then, we will explore sociolinguistic issues common to the three languages that underlie the linguistic diversity (and similarities) of East Asia, such as the following topic: (i) the use of Chinese characters, the history of writing reform, and its relation to literacy in East Asian languages; (ii) loan words in East Asian languages, in particular, the use of Chinese characters in modern Japanese and Korean in age of colonialism; (iii) the development and use of honorifics in China, Japan, and Korea, etc. For a comparative approach and perspective to these topics, students will read academic papers for each language on a given topic and discuss the unique sociolinguistic features of each language. Such an approach will allow us to analyze the language influence and interaction among the three languages and how that shapes the culture, society, and language acquisition. Finally, this course will also introduce the field of second language acquisition focusing on how social factors influence L2 learning and acquisition.

Instructor(s): H. Kim     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 26601

EALC 36800. Korean Literature, Foreign Criticism. 100 Units.

Course descriptions: Ever since the introduction of the modern/Western  concept of “literature” to the early twentieth century Korea, literary production, consumption, and reproduction have gone hand in hand with the reception of the trends of “criticism” and “theory” propagated elsewhere, in the West in particular. This course examines the relationship between the ideas of “indigenous” and “foreign” as embodied by Korean writers in the fields of creative writings, journalism, and academia with a view to engaging and interrogating the idea of “national literature” and its institutional manifestations. It further examines artistic and theoretical endeavors by Korean writers and intellectuals to critically reflect upon and move beyond the unquestioned linguistic, ideological, and ethno-national boundaries.

Instructor(s): K. Choi     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 26800

EALC 36900. Gender in Korean Film and Dramatic Television. 100 Units.

The course introduces a group of representative cinematic and television dramatic texts with the assumption that the ideas and practices surrounding gender and sexuality have been integral to the development of dramatic art forms in modern Korea. The primary objective is to discuss the ways in which various discourses and features of modern gendering are interwoven into the workings of filmic structure and image-making. While attending to distinctive generic characteristics of film as distinct from literature and of dramatic television as distinguished from film, the course explores the concrete possibilities, challenges, and limits with which cinematic texts address the questions of gender relations and sexuality.

Instructor(s): K. Choi     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 26900,GNSE 26902,GNSE 36900

EALC 37460. Historiography, Literature, Archaeology. 100 Units.

 This course examines the relation between historicity and the literary, using Sima Qian’s Shiji (Records of the Grand Historian) as the primary example.  The Shiji is arguably the most influential Chinese work of historiography, and we will also explore its interdisciplinary and international afterlife.  Particular attention will be paid to notions of the immaterial (the unreal, the fictional, the spiritual, the theoretical), the exotic (the non-Chinese, the foreign), and the universal, in traditional Chinese historiography and poetics, in modern archaeology, and in critical theory.  Students without classical Chinese reading knowledge are welcome to join and to write their final papers on comparative topics.

Instructor(s): Tamara Chin     Terms Offered: Winter 2013
Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 39601

EALC 37907. Asian Wars of the 20th Century. 100 Units.

This course examines the political, economic, social, cultural, racial, and military aspects of the major Asian wars of the 20th century: the Pacific War, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. At the beginning of the course we pay particular attention to just war doctrines, and then use two to three books for each war(along with several films) to examine alternative approaches to understanding the origins of wars, their conduct and their consequences.

Instructor(s): B. Cumings     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 27900,CRES 27900,EALC 27907,HIST 37900

EALC 38200. Reading the Revolution: Chinese Social History in Documents. 100 Units.

How can we reconstruct the life experience of “ordinary” people at a time of revolutionary change? What are the sources for a history of the Chinese revolution? What can we learn from newspaper articles and official publication? What kind of information can we expect to find in unpublished sources, such as letters and diaries? How useful is oral history, and what are its limitations? We will look at internal and “open” publications and at the production of media reports to understand how the official record was created and how information was channeled, at official compilations such as the Selections of Historical Materials (wenshi ziliao), at “raw” reports from provincial archives, and finally at so-called “garbage materials” (laji cailiao), i.e. archival files collect from flea markets and waste paper traders.

Instructor(s): J. Eyferth     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 28200,HIST 24505,HIST 34505

EALC 38800. Class and Inequality in Contemporary China. 100 Units.

In the past thirty years, income distribution in China changed from one of the most equal in the world to one of the most unequal ones. This course looks at the roots of inequality in Maoist developmental strategies that favored the cities over the countryside, at the decline of the socialist working class since the 1990s, the emergence of a new working class composed of migrants and of a new urban bourgeoisie, at the administrative structures and ideologies that support inequality in a nominally socialist state, and at protests by workers, farmers, and other disenfranchised social groups. All readings are in English.

Instructor(s): J. Eyferth     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 28800,HIST 24106,HIST 34106

EALC 39001. Introduction to Classical Japanese. 100 Units.

Introduction to the grammar and style of premodern Japanese through a variety of literary texts. Emphasis will be placed on extensive grammatical analysis and translation. Work with original manuscripts will also be introduced as the course progresses. 

Instructor(s): R. Jackson     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Three years modern Japanese or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 19000,EALC 19001,JAPN 39000

EALC 40455. Selected Readings in Modern Chinese History. 100 Units.

We will read and discuss important English-language works on modern Chinese history that have appeared in the past five years or so. The emphasis is on social and cultural history, with some flexibility to accommodate interests of participating students. The aim of the course is to introduce graduate students in EALC, history, and related disciplines to current debates in the field. Expect to read two books per week.

Instructor(s): J. Eyferth     Terms Offered: Spring

EALC 41399. The Visual Culture of Opera in Late China. 100 Units.

The passion for opera throughout China during the late imperial period was not restricted to the stage but permeated the visual and material landscape of everyday life, from the court on down. Operatic characters and stories were favored as pictorial and decorative motifs across the full spectrum of visual mediums from tomb carvings and scroll paintings to popular prints, illustrated books, and painted fans, to carved utensils, ceramics, textiles, dioramas, and photographs.  In preparation for an exhibition to be held at the Smart in 2014, students will research the representation of Chinese opera and its significance in a variety of visual, textual, and material forms. 

Instructor(s): Judith Zeitlin     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Reading knowledge of Chinese
Note(s): Open to qualified advanced undergradutes with permission of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 41399

EALC 41900. Heian Literature. 100 Units.

This graduate seminar will survey a range of Japanese literary texts from the Heian period (794-1185). We will read from works such as the Kokinshû, Taketori monogatari, Makura no sôshi, Tosa nikki, Genji monogatari, and Konjaku monogatarishû. Students will become versed in major works of secondary criticism in Japanese and English on the texts we examine, and will also develop the skills necessary for reading Heian calligraphic texts.

Instructor(s): Reginald Jackson     Terms Offered: Spring 2013
Prerequisite(s): Reading knowledge of modern and pre-modern Japanese

EALC 41920. Mediating Japanese Gesture. 100 Units.

What is gesture and how should we understand the aesthetic and political work it performs? How does technological medium alter the shape and significance of bodily movements? This course takes up gesture as a concept through which to explore the relationship between Performance Studies and Japanese Studies. Through close readings of literary, cinematic, and theoretical texts, we will examine a range of issues related to embodiment in Japanese culture. The centerpiece of the course will be a two-week residency by award-winning choreographer and filmaker Yasuko Yokoshi during which she will engage students as she develops her newest dance composition, which melds Kabuki and ballet. Students will develop skills of performance analysis and critical writing. Readings by Tanizaki, Sontag, Sedwick, Zeami, Lamarre, Berlant, J. Butler, A. Lippit, Kittler, Uchino.           

Instructor(s): Reginald Jackson     Terms Offered: Autumn 2012
Equivalent Course(s): TAPS 28456,EALC 21920

EALC 42210. Aspects of Wang Bi's Reading of the Yijing. 100 Units.

Discussion of Wang Bi’s  (226-249 AD) intellectual and social world, using a selected list of West.-lang. and Chinese-lang. secondary works. Exploration of the history of the metaphor/trope “wanwu”, including the recovered pre-Han text of that name. Discussion of its role in Xici zhuan, as well as its repurposing in Wang’s Zhouyi zhu.  We shall try to suggest Wang Bi’s motivations for his own use of "wanwu", whether from external, social ideals or forces, or internal, idealistic ones.

Instructor(s): Howard Goodman     Terms Offered: Winter 2013

EALC 42512. The Painter's Project in Japan, 1750-1930. 100 Units.

This course examines the varied and changing positions of the painter in Japan from the 18th through early 20th centuries. We will consider approaches to the negotiation of artistic selfhood, historical consciousness, copying and the archive, tropes of originality and eccentricity, as well as limitations placed on painters based on gender, socioeconomic background, and region. Painters under investigation include Jakuchu, Hokusai, Takahashi Yuichi, Kyosai, Uemura Shoen, Foujita, Kishida Ryusei, and early Japanese-American artists. Students interested in pursuing comparative work between Japan and another region are encouraged to do so

Instructor(s): C. Foxwell     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 42512

EALC 42609. Seminar: Japanese Handscroll Paintings. 100 Units.

For course description contact Art History.

Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 44909

EALC 42610. Imperial Collections of Chinese Painting & Calligraphy. 100 Units.

For course description contact Art History.

Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 42610

EALC 43000. Censorship in East Asia: The Case of Colonial Korea. 100 Units.

This course examines the operation and consequences of censorship in the Japanese Empire, with focus on its effects in colonial Korea. It begins with two basic premises: first, both the Japanese colonial authorities’ measures of repression, and the Korean responses to them, can be understood as noticeably more staunch and sophisticated when compared to any other region of the Empire; and second, the censorship practices in Korea offers itself as a case that is in itself an effective point of comparison to better understand other censorship operations in general and the impact of these operations across different regions. With a view to probing an inter- and intra-relationship between censorship practices among a variety of imperial/colonial regions, this course studies the institutions related to censorship, the human agents involved in censorship—both external and internal—and texts and translations that were produced in and outside of Korea, and were subject to censorship. Overall, the course stresses the importance of establishing a comparative understanding of the functions of censorship, and on the basis of this comparative thinking we will strive to conceptualize the characteristics of Japanese colonial censorship in Korea.

Instructor(s): K. Choi     Terms Offered: Winter

EALC 44411. Japanese Literary Discourses of Furusato. 100 Units.

The "furusato" (rural hometown) has played an important, sometimes fraught, role in modern Japanese literature, whether as an invented tradition, as a locus of emotional attachment, or as a site of resistance against the dislocations of modernity.   This course will survey a number of important modern Japanese literary texts depicting "furusato," as well as recent scholarship on the topic.  It will also look at similar formations in other countries, including Germany and China.   A large portion of the course readings will be in Japanese, although some selections will be provided in English.

Instructor(s): M. Bourdaghs      Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): undefined
Note(s): undefined

EALC 44415. The Philosophy of Money in Japanese Literature. 100 Units.

This course will survey works of Japanese fiction and poetry revolving around issues of money stretching from the late 17th through the late 20th century.  We will also read key works in the philosophy of money (Adam Smith, Karl Marx, George Simmel, Karatani Kojin), works of critical theory on the relationship between literature and money, and recent scholarship on the history of money in Japan.  All readings will be available in English, although some texts will also be provided in Japanese.

Instructor(s): M. Bourdaghs      Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): undefined
Note(s): undefined

EALC 45401. Western Zhou Bronze Inscriptions. 100 Units.

This seminar is designed to introduce the student to the use of bronze inscriptions in interpreting the history of the Western Zhou dynasty (1045-771 B.C.). While much of the seminar will be spent in attaining the methodological skills necessary to read the inscriptions, historical issues will also be discussed. In this year's seminar, we will focus particularly on the reign of Xuan Wang (r. 827/25-782 B.C.).

Instructor(s): E. Shaughnessy     Terms Offered: Autumn

EALC 45530. Manuscript Culture in Ancient and Medieval China. 100 Units.

Thousands of Chinese manuscripts dating between the fifth century B.C. and the tenth century A.D. have been discovered since the beginning of the twentieth century, with new discoveries continuing to the present. This seminar addresses theoretical and methodological approaches to engaging in research on the manuscripts ,Thousands of Chinese manuscripts dating between the fifth century B.C. and the tenth century A.D. have been discovered since the beginning of the twentieth century, with new discoveries continuing to the present. This seminar addresses theoretical and methodological approaches to engaging in research on the manuscripts.

Instructor(s): D. Harper,D. Harper and M. Kalinowski     Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring 2013
Prerequisite(s): ,Consent required

EALC 45820. Chinese Buddhist Texts and Thought. 100 Units.

This course is intended as an introduction to the major textual and philosophical currents of Chinese Buddhism for Ph.D. students of Chinese art, history, and literature (though it is in principle open to anyone who can read literary Chinese).  We will read sections from important scriptures such as the Vimalakirti, Lotus, and Heart sutras, as well as from Chan literature, with the primary goal of understanding basic Buddhist doctrines (such as "expedient means," "emptiness," "conditioned arising," "Buddha-nature," etc), as well as to gain familiarity with the language and styles of Chinese Buddhist texts and thought

Instructor(s): P. Copp     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): A companion course dealing with basic texts and doctrines of Daoism will be offered in alternate years.

EALC 45830. Sources and Methods in the Study of East Asian Buddhism. 100 Units.

This course is intended for graduate students with research interests in Buddhism in East Asia.  We will critically examine the approaches modern scholars have taken to the subject (the sources they have focused on, the methods they have employed, the kinds of things they have construed Buddhism to be) as a way to both learn the field and develop our own skills as scholars.   Ability in Chinese and/or Japanese helpful but not required.
,This course is intended for graduate students with research interests in Buddhism in East Asia.  We will critically examine the approaches modern scholars have taken to the subject (the sources they have focused on, the methods they have employed, the kinds of things they have construed Buddhism to be) as a way to both learn the field and develop our own skills as scholars.

Instructor(s): Paul Copp     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Chinese or Japanese ability helpful but not required.

EALC 45855. Readings in Tang and Song Texts. 100 Units.

This quarter the focus is on the genre of religious/philosophical exegesis.  We will read representatives commentaries of the Laozi and the Heart Sūtra.

Instructor(s): P. Copp      Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Ability in Literary Chinese.
Note(s): undefined

EALC 53500. Chin P'ing Mei-1. 100 Units.

Open to undergraduates and gradute students who do not read Chinese, although those who can do so will be expected to read the text in its original form. Paper will be required end of second course. A careful reading and discussion of this major work of traditional Chinese fiction in both the original language and in English translation, with excursions into the relevant secondary scholarship.

Instructor(s): David Roy     Terms Offered: Winter 2013
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 56500

EALC 53501. Chin P'ing Mei-2. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Spring 2013
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 56600

EALC 59700. Thesis Research. 100 Units.

For course description contact East Asian Languages. ,

Terms Offered: ,Autumn
Note(s): ,Consent required.

EALC 60000. Reading Course: Special Topic Chinese,Reading Course. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): Arr.,     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Consent required.

EALC 65000. Directed Translation. 100 Units.

For course description contact East Asian Languages.

EALC 70000. Advanced Study: East Asian. Units.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Consent required.