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Department of Comparative Human Development

This is an archived copy of the 2012-13 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://catalogs.uchicago.edu.

Chair
Richard P. Taub

Professors
Jennifer Cole
Susan Goldin-Meadow
Sydney Hans
Don Kulick
Susan Levine
John A. Lucy
Dario Maestripieri
Martha K. McClintock
Richard Shweder
Margaret Beale Spencer
Nancy Lou Stein

Associate Professors
William Goldstein
Guanglei Hong
Micere Keels
Jill Mateo

Assistant Professors
Eugene Raikhel
Lindsey Richland

Faculty Associates
Kathleen Cagney
Judith Farquhar
Salikoko Mufwene
Linda Waite
Amanda Woodward

Emeritus Faculty
R. Darrell Bock
Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
Irene Elkin
Ray Fogelson
Eugene T. Gendlin
Philip W. Jackson
David E. Orlinsky
Susan Stodolsky


The Department of Comparative Human Development was founded in 1940 by Carl Rogers (psychologist), Lloyd Warner (anthropologist), Robert Havighurst (sociologist), and Ralph Tyler (educator), to focus on the study of the individual within context. Its faculty believes that social life is too complex to be left within any one discipline. Consequently, the department brings together anthropologists, psychologists, sociologists, biologists, and applied statisticians whose work extends disciplinary boundaries and synthesizes theories, insights, questions, and methods from across the social science spectrum.  

Some current research programs include the impact of globalization on family relationships and the transition to adulthood, the relation of language to thought, the health consequences of social experiences, cultural politics of gender and sexual identity, models of biopsychological development, the nature of the self, the ethical and moral issues raised by increasingly multicultural societies, variations in the learning process in educational settings, and methods for investigating causality.

Each student is given faculty assistance in (1) planning a program of courses and training; (2) fulfilling the Divisional and Departmental steps leading to the Ph.D. degree; (3) obtaining a professional position after graduation. Each entering student is assigned to a faculty advisor who will serve until the student chooses a research advisor. The student should also consult with the Comparative Human Development Secretary for information regarding procedures.

Programs

Students, in consultation with faculty advisors, develop an area of specialization (program) appropriate to their professional goals and research interests. Some of the department’s central areas of specialization are described below.

Comparative Behavioral Biology

This program investigates behavioral processes at the social, psychological and biological levels of organization in both humans and nonhuman animals. Current research is concentrated in three main areas. In the area of behavioral and reproductive endocrinology, research conducted with rodents and humans investigates the social and behavioral control of fertility and reproduction and the role of hormone behavior interactions in development throughout the life span. Specific topics of interest include mechanisms and function of estrous and menstrual synchrony, facultative adjustment of sex ratios, pheromonal communication, reproductive senescence, psychosomatics in obstetrics and gynecology, and the behavioral modulation of the immune function. In the area of comparative development, we use nonhuman primate and rodent models of parenting and development to investigate social, emotional, and endocrine aspects of mother infant attachment and infant development, with particular emphasis on interindividual variability both within and outside the normal range. Other topics of interest include affiliative and aggressive behavior, mating strategies, nonverbal communication and social cognition in rodents, primates and humans. In the area of social neuroscience, one topic of interest is evaluative processes, e.g., affective, attitudinal, or emotional operations by which individuals discriminate hostile from hospitable environments. Of interest as well is in the role of social and autonomic factors in individuals endocrine and cellular immune response to stress and illness vulnerability. Throughout, the research approach is characterized by the integration of social and biological levels of analysis.

CHDV 34300Primate Behavior and Ecology *100
CHDV 30901Biopsychology of Sex Differences *100
CHDV 34800Kinship and Social Systems *100
CHDV 37500Research Seminar in Animal Behavior I **100
CHDV 37502Research Seminar in Animal Behavior II **100
CHDV 37503Research Seminar in Animal Behavior III **100
CHDV 37801Evolutionary Psychology100
PSYC 48001Mind and Biology Proseminar I (=CHDV 38000) **000
PSYC 48002Mind and Biology Proseminar II (=CHDV 38100) **000
PSYC 48003Mind and Biology Proseminar III (=CHDV 38200) **100

(*) Satisfies the breadth requirement.

(**) All three quarters of sequence must be taken in order to receive a letter grade.

Comparative Life Course

The Department of Comparative Human Development has long had a focus on development throughout the life span. Indeed, one of the unifying principles that cuts across the department is that there is a deep interest, not merely in charting change over time, but in understanding the mechanisms and principles that underlie that change at all levels. Faculty and students in the department conduct developmental research in a wide variety of domains (cognitive, social, emotional, physical) and species (humans, primates, rodents). Ongoing projects include: ethnological studies of biosocial development from infancy though adulthood and aging; effects of psychosocial deprivation on psychological state and risk for disease; parent child relationships across the life course; risk and resilience in development; social emotional development in early childhood; social class and ethnic differences in socialization; genetic and developmental factors in psychosocial development; naturalistic studies of children in school environments; language development as a creative process; studies of how children and adults understand and tell narratives; the role of nonverbal behavior in learning and cognitive development; the role of the linguistic and cultural environment in the child's acquisition of language; language socialization; the role of sociocultural context in cognitive development.

CHDV 31000Cultural Psychology (*)100
CHDV 40207Development in Adolescents (*)100
CHDV 25900Developmental Psychology (only offered to undergraduates Winter 2013)100

(*) Satisfies the breadth requirement.

Cultural Psychology and Psychological Anthropology

The Department of Comparative Human Development is a leading center for training in psychological anthropology, cultural psychology, the study of culture and mental health, and the cross cultural study of human development. The aim of the program is to document and explain ethnic and cultural sources of diversity in emotional and somatic functioning, self organization, moral evaluation, social cognition and human development. Ethnographic field work both in the United States and abroad is an important component of this program, although multiple methods (qualitative and quantitative, observational, clinical and experimental) are applied to the study of similarities and differences in psychological functioning across human populations. Members of the faculty and students have conducted field studies of child socialization practices in the nations of the Pacific; of culture specific and universal structures in cognitive development; identity and self concept of Native American youth; of moral development, conceptions of the life course, and explanations of suffering in India and the United States; of modes of thought and their relationship to linguistic structures in contemporary Mayan communities in Mexico, and among various ethnic groups in the city of Chicago. The program encourages comparative study of psychological functioning mentalities in cultures including India, Japan, China, Russia, and the Middle East, as well as research on psychological topics in local communities around the world.

CHDV 30600Social Psychology100
CHDV 31000Cultural Psychology (*)100
CHDV 32101Culture, Power, Subjectivity: Migration and Multiculturalism (*)100
CHDV 32212Love, Capital and Conjugality: Africa and India in Comparative Perspective100
CHDV 42214Ethnographic Writing100
CHDV 43302Illness and Subjectivity100
CHDV 43600Processes of Judgement and Decision Making100
CHDV 44700Seminar: Topics in Judgement and Decision Making100
CHDV 45601Moral Development & Comparative Ethics100
CHDV 50036 Sem: Honor

(*) Satisfies the breadth requirement.

Health, Culture and Mental Health

This program is designed for students interested in combining normative social science inquiry with focused study in the area of mental health. This course of study involves multidisciplinary inquiry into the processes and determinants of personality, social and cognitive development throughout the life course, and the comparative study of suffering and healing systems. Program faculty are presently involved with mental health research in three interrelated fields: (1) The study of psychopathology, vulnerability and resilience across the life course; (2) the study of psychotherapy and comparable systems of personal change; (3) the study of health and optimal functioning, coping strategies and creativity. Research in the personality area encompasses both traditional perspectives on the study of persons and social life and emerging perspectives focusing on such areas as the interplay of cognition and emotion in personal life and in culture, and language and discourse as relevant in understanding personality and social life. The program includes faculty working from the disciplinary perspectives of personality, social and clinical psychology, anthropology, political science, and biology. Relevant faculty and resources of the University outside the Department of Comparative Human Development will also be available to students.

CHDV 33301Culture, Mental Health, and Psychiatry (*)100
CHDV 36400Theories of Emotion and the Psychology of Well Being (*)100
CHDV 38701Social and Cultural Foundations of Mental Health (*)100
CHDV 43302Illness and Subjectivity100

(*) Satisfies the breadth requirement.

Language, Communication and Cognition

This program area supports research and training on how language and other forms of communication relate to cognition. Particular emphases are on the role of language in thinking and the use of comparative perspectives to address this issue. Among the more important comparisons are those across different languages, institutional settings, cultures, ages, and species drawing in each case on the relevant disciplines concerned with those areas.

CHDV 23900Introduction to Language Development (*)100
CHDV 41601 Seminar in Language Development
CHDV 45501Cognition and Education (*)100
CHDV 53350Gesture, Sign, and Language100

(*) Satisfies the breadth requirement.

Workshops

The University's Council on Advanced Studies oversees a series of interdisciplinary workshops, each of which reflects the research interests of a particular group of faculty members and graduate students.  The following workshops are sponsored by faculty members and organized by graduate students from the Department of Comparative Human Development (often in collaboration with faculty and students from other departments): Comparative Behavioral Biology; Self and Subjectivity; Education.  A full list of workshops is available at http://cas.uchicago.edu/

Requirements

Every student is required to take the following courses for a quality grade:

  • CHDV 40000 HD Concepts
  • Five CHD area courses (one in each area):
    • Comparative Behavioral Biology
    • Comparative Life Course
    • Cultural Psychology and Psychological Anthropology
    • Health, Culture and Mental Health
    • Language, Communication and Cognition
  • Intermediate Statistics from among the following: 
CHDV 30101Applied Statistics in Human Development Research100
PPHA 31000Statistics for Public Policy I (**)100
PPHA 31100Statistics for Public Policy II (**)100
STAT 22000Statistical Methods and Applications100

(**) Both courses must be taken in sequence to fulfill requirement


  • One additional methods course from among the following:
CHDV 30102Causal Inference100
CHDV 32411Mediation, Moderation, and Spillover Effects100
CHDV 42214Ethnographic Writing100
CHDV 45700Urban Field Research100
SOCI 30005Statistical Methods of Research-2100
SOCI 30111Survey Analysis I100
SOCI 30112Applications of Hierarchical Linear Models100
SOCI 30118Survey Research Overview100
SOCI 30157Mathematical Models100
SOCI 30206Demographic Methods: Measurement and Analysis100
SOCI 40103Event History Analysis100
SOCI 40112Ethnographic Methods100
  • CHDV 42401 Trial Research in Human Development - I and CHDV 42402 Trial Research in Human Development - II. May be taken pass/fail.
  • Two additional CHD courses in chosen area of specialization

Students are not required to complete all these requirements by the end of their second year. However, they must have five quality grades by the end of spring of their first year, and ten quality grades by the end of the second year. On average a graduate student should take at least two courses for quality grades in each quarter of their first two years.

In addition, students will participate in elective courses and workshops in the department, and the University in consultation with their advisors. CHDV 40000 HD Concepts will introduce students to the history, theoretical bases, and concepts of the field of human development, and to the major areas of inquiry in the Department of Comparative Human Development. This is taken during the fall quarter of the first or second year.

The trial research seminars (CHDV 42401 Trial Research in Human Development - I and CHDV 42402 Trial Research in Human Development - II) will launch students into their research projects and will guide them from the beginning to the completion of those projects. The trial research seminar is taken in the spring quarter of the first year and the fall quarter of the second year. Trial research papers are due by spring quarter of the second year.

A grade of B or better is required to satisfy the requirements of these courses. Students are expected to maintain an average of B+ or better. A student who can demonstrate basic competence in the core curricular areas may petition the faculty through the Chair's office to place into an advanced course in the same area. A well qualified student may place out of intermediate statistics by examination provided by the instructor of the statistics course.

Trial Research

All students are required to enroll in a trial research seminar in the spring quarter of the first year and the autumn quarter of the second year. The trial research project must be completed and formally approved by the faculty during the spring quarter of the student’s second year. Students are expected to report regularly on the progress of their research to the trial research seminars. The trial research is carried out under the direction of the research advisor and is read by one other faculty member.

Evaluations

All students are evaluated each year in the program. To be considered in good standing and for continuation of financial aid, first and second year students must have earned at minimum five quality grades (B or better) over autumn and winter quarters by the time of the spring review, with satisfactory spring grades expected to follow. The evaluation at the end of the second year is particularly important, as it determines whether a student will be permitted to conduct dissertation research.

Advisors

Each student is assigned a faculty member at the beginning of the first year of study to serve as a research advisor. Students may change research advisors as their needs and interests evolve, but students are expected to be affiliated with one or more research advisors throughout their graduate careers.

 

 

Information on How to Apply

The application process for admission and financial aid for all Social Sciences graduate programs is administered through the divisional Office of the Dean of Students. The Application for Admission and Financial Aid, with instructions, deadlines and department specific information is available online at: https://apply-ssd.uchicago.edu/apply/

Questions pertaining to admissions and aid should be directed to admissions@ssd.uchicago.edu or (773) 702-8415. Most of the documents needed for the application can be uploaded through the online application. Any additional correspondence and materials sent in support of applications should be mailed to:

The University of Chicago
Division of the Social Sciences
Admissions Office, Foster 105
1130 East 59th Street

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comparative Human Development Courses

CHDV 30101. Applied Statistics in Human Development Research. 100 Units.

This course provides an introduction to quantitative methods of inquiry and a foundation for more advanced courses in applied statistics for students in social sciences with a focus on human development research. The course covers univariate and bivariate descriptive statistics, an introduction to statistical inference, t test, two-way contingency table, analysis of variance, and regression. All statistical concepts and methods will be illustrated with application studies in which we will consider the research questions, study design, analytical choices, validity of inferences, and reports of findings. The examples include (1) examining the relationship between home environment and child development and (2) evaluating the effectiveness of class size reduction for promoting student learning. At the end of the course, students should be able to define and use the descriptive and inferential statistics taught in this course to analyze data and to interpret the analytical results. Students will learn to use the SPSS software. No prior knowledge in statistics is assumed. (M)

Instructor(s): G. Hong     Terms Offered: Spring 2013
Prerequisite(s): High school algebra and probability are the only mathematical prerequisites.
Equivalent Course(s): CHDV 20101,HDCP 56050

CHDV 30102. Causal Inference. 100 Units.

This course is designed for graduate students and advanced undergraduate students from social sciences, health science, public policy, and social services administration who will be or are currently involved in quantitative research and are interested in studying causality. The course begins by introducing Rubin’s causal model. A major emphasis will be placed on conceptualizing causal questions including intent-to-treat effect, differential treatment effect, mediated treatment effect, and cumulative treatment effect. In addition to comparing alternative experimental, quasi-experimental, and non-experimental designs, we will clarify the assumptions under which a causal effect can be identified and estimated from non-experimental data. Students will become familiar with causal inference techniques suitable for evaluating binary treatments, concurrent multi-valued treatments, continuous treatments, or time-varying treatments in quasi-experimental or non-experimental data. These include propensity score matching and stratification, inverse-probability-of-treatment weighting (IPTW) and marginal mean weighting through stratification (MMW-S), regression discontinuity design, and the instrumental variable (IV) method. The course is aimed at equipping students with preliminary knowledge and skills necessary for appraising and conducting causal comparative studies. (M)

Instructor(s): G. Hong     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Statistics
Equivalent Course(s): STAT 31900

CHDV 30301. Learning Laboratory Research. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): L. Richland     Terms Offered: Winter 2013
Note(s): Graduate course open to undergraduates

CHDV 30302. Problems of Public Policy Implementation. 100 Units.

Once a governmental policy or program is established, there is the challenge of getting it carried out in ways intended by the policy makers. We explore how obstacles emerge because of problems of hierarchy, competing goals, and cultures of different groups. We then discuss how they may be overcome by groups, as well as by creators and by those responsible for implementing programs. We also look at varying responses of target populations. (C)

Instructor(s): R. Taub     Terms Offered: Autumn 2012
Prerequisite(s): One prior 20000-level social sciences course.
Note(s): PBPL 22100-22200-22300 may be taken in or out of sequence.

CHDV 30401. Intensive Study of a Culture: Lowland Maya History and Ethnography. 100 Units.

The survey encompasses the dynamics of first contact; long-term cultural accommodations achieved during colonial rule; disruptions introduced by state and market forces during the early postcolonial period; the status of indigenous communities in the twentieth century; and new social, economic, and political challenges being faced by the contemporary peoples of the area. We stress a variety of traditional theoretical concerns of the broader Mesoamerican region stressed (e.g., the validity of reconstructive ethnography; theories of agrarian community structure; religious revitalization movements; the constitution of such identity categories as indigenous, Mayan, and Yucatecan). In this respect, the course can serve as a general introduction to the anthropology of the region. The relevance of these area patterns for general anthropological debates about the nature of culture, history, identity, and social change are considered.

Instructor(s): J. Lucy     Terms Offered: Autumn

CHDV 30405. Anthropology of Disability. 100 Units.

This seminar undertakes to explore "disability" from an anthropological perspective that recognizes it as a socially constructed concept with implications for our understanding of fundamental issues about culture, society, and individual differences. We explore a wide range of theoretical, legal, ethical, and policy issues as they relate to the experiences of persons with disabilities, their families, and advocates. The final project is a presentation on the fieldwork.

Instructor(s): M. Fred     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Third- or fourth-year standing
Equivalent Course(s): MAPS 36900,ANTH 20405,ANTH 30405,HMRT 25210,HMRT 35210,SOSC 36900

CHDV 30901. Biopsychology of Sex Differences. 100 Units.

This course will explore the biological basis of mammalian sex differences and reproductive behaviors. We will consider a variety of species, including humans.  We will address the physiological, hormonal, ecological and social basis of sex differences. To get the most from this course, students should have some background in biology, preferably from taking an introductory course in biology or biological psychology. (A, 1)

Instructor(s): J. Mateo     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): PSYC 31600,EVOL 36900,GNSE 30901

CHDV 31000. Cultural Psychology. 100 Units.

There is a substantial portion of the psychological nature of human beings that is neither homogeneous nor fixed across time and space. At the heart of the discipline of cultural psychology is the tenet of psychological pluralism. Research findings in cultural psychology raise provocative questions about the integrity and value of alternative forms of subjectivity across cultural groups. This course analyzes the concept of “culture” and examines ethnic and cross-cultural variations in mental functioning, with special attention to the cultural psychology of emotions, self, moral judgment, categorization, and reasoning.

Instructor(s): R. Shweder     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Third- or fourth-year standing
Equivalent Course(s): GNSE 21001,ANTH 21500,ANTH 35110,CHDV 21000,PSYC 23000,PSYC 33000

CHDV 32101. Culture, Power, Subjectivity: Migration and Multiculturalism. 100 Units.

This quarter’s version of Culture, Power, Subjectivity focuses on migration, multiculturalism and the processes of social transformation that occur as people move across cultural/national borders. The goals of the course are threefold.  First, rather than take migration as an already-constituted object of study, we will consider how it is that social scientists (and anthropologists and sociologists in particular) have thought about questions of migration and movement and therefore posed certain kinds of questions and not others.  Examining this problem means that we will also have to consider some foundational texts on “culture,” “society” and “migration.”  The second goal of the class is to develop a new vocabulary for theorizing the social and cultural processes that occur in migration.  Finally, we will scrutinize the content of various ethnographies -- the predicaments people face, how they get resolved, the consequences etc.  Students should leave the class with a better grasp of some of the foundational concepts in anthropology and sociology as well as an appreciation of the empirical phenomenon of migration. (C*)

Instructor(s): J. Cole     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor required for undergraduates.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 32110

CHDV 32212. Love, Capital and Conjugality: Africa and India in Comparative Perspective. 100 Units.

Are love and money necessarily opposed? Is arranged marriage primitive? Many would argue yes.  It is widely accepted that in modern societies romantic love, the couple and the nuclear family are the "correct" ways to organize intimate life.  But, like many other normative ideas, these too were the product of particular historical developments in post-enlightenment Europe.  A look at societies in other parts of the world demonstrates all too often that modernity in the realm of love, intimacy and family had a different trajectory from the European one. To characterize marriage, love, and familial relationships as backward or retrograde on grounds of their difference with (normative) models prevalent in the west results in a fundamental misunderstanding of the variety of different ways that societies have forged intimate relations.  This course surveys ideas and practices surrounding love, marriage, and capital in the modern world with a particular focus on comparison between Africa and India.  The first half of the class concentrates on key theoretical texts that lay the foundation for the study of gender, intimacy and modern life. The latter part of the class examines case studies from Africa and India.  Using a range of readings the course will explore such questions as the emergence of companionate marriage in Europe; arranged marriage, dowry, love and money. (C)

Instructor(s): J. Cole, R. Majumdar     Terms Offered: Winter 2013

CHDV 34300. Primate Behavior and Ecology. 100 Units.

This course explores the behavior and ecology of nonhuman primates with emphasis on their natural history and evolution. Specific topics include methods for the study of primate behavior, history of primate behavior research, socioecology, foraging, predation, affiliation, aggression, mating, parenting, development, communication, cognition, and evolution of human behavior. (A, 1)

Instructor(s): D. Maestripieri     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): CHDV 21800

CHDV 34800. Kinship and Social Systems. 100 Units.

This course will use a biological approach to understanding how groups form and how cooperation and competition modulate group size and reproductive success.  We will explore social systems from evolutionary and ecological perspectives, focusing on how the biotic and social environments favor cooperation among kin as well as how these environmental features influence mating systems and inclusive fitness.  While a strong background in evolutionary theory is not required, students should have basic understanding of biology and natural selection.  Course will use combination of lectures and discussion. (A*, 1*)

Instructor(s): J. Mateo     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): EVOL 34800

CHDV 36400. Theories of Emotion and the Psychology of Well Being. 100 Units.

This course will review different approaches to the study of emotion and well being, different ways of measuring well being, the relationship between positive and negative well being, and the degree to which well-being can be changed. We will discuss studies that focus on the mechanisms that control psychological well being, and the thinking, appraisals, and beliefs that lead to positive versus negative well being. We will also investigate those conditions that produce irrevocable changes in psychological well being and those conditions that promote robustness.

Instructor(s): N. Stein     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): PSYC 26400,CHDV 23800,PSYC 36400

CHDV 37201. Language in Culture I. 100 Units.

Among topics discussed in the first half of the sequence are the formal structure of semiotic systems, the ethnographically crucial incorporation of linguistic forms into cultural systems, and the methods for empirical investigation of “functional” semiotic structure and history.

Instructor(s): M. Silverstein     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 37201,LING 31100,PSYC 47001

CHDV 37500-37502-37503. Research Seminar in Animal Behavior I-II-III.

This workshop involves weekly research seminars in animal behavior given by faculty members, postdocs, and advanced graduate students from this and other institutions. The seminars are followed by discussion in which students have the opportunity to interact with the speaker, ask questions about the presentation, and share information about their work. This workshop exposes students to current comparative research in behavioral biology and provides interactions with some of the leading scientists in this field. (A)

CHDV 37500. Research Seminar in Animal Behavior I. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): J. Mateo     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Students register for this course in Autumn Quarter and receive credit in Spring Quarter after successful completion of the year’s work.
Equivalent Course(s): EVOL 37600

CHDV 37502. Research Seminar in Animal Behavior II. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): J. Mateo     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): EVOL 37700

CHDV 37503. Research Seminar in Animal Behavior III. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): J. Mateo     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): EVOL 37800

CHDV 37801. Evolutionary Psychology. 100 Units.

This course explores human social behavior from the perspective of a new discipline: evolutionary psychology. In this course we will read and discuss articles in which evolutionary theory has been applied to different aspects of human behavior and social life such as: developmental sex differences, cooperation and altruism, competition and aggression, physical attractiveness and mating strategies, incest avoidance and marriage, sexual coercion, parenting and child abuse, language and cognition, and psychological and personality disorders. (A, 1)

Instructor(s): D. Maestriperi, D. Gallo     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Undergraduates must have permission of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): PSYC 41450,CHDV 41451

CHDV 38101-38102. Anthropology of Museums I-II.

This sequence examines museums from a variety of perspectives. We consider the World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893, the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, the image and imagination of African American culture as presented in local museums, and museums as memorials, as exemplified by Holocaust exhibitions. Several visits to area museums required.

CHDV 38101. Anthropology of Museums I. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): M. Fred     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Advanced standing and consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 24511,ANTH 34502,CRES 34501,MAPS 34500,SOSC 34500

CHDV 38102. Anthropology of Museums II. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): M. Fred     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Advanced standing and consent of instructor

CHDV 38701. Social and Cultural Foundations of Mental Health. 100 Units.

The wellbeing of individuals depends on sociocultural as well as psychobiological conditions, yet current professional thinking about mental health and illness focuses almost exclusively on psychobiological factors. Mental health is influenced significantly by the levels and types of environmental support and of stress that persons experience in their social milieus, which differentially affect their individual strengths and vulnerabilities. This course aims to broaden our concepts of positive mental health by examining the contributions of major social scientific theorists, such as Durkheim, Freud, Simmel, Weber, Mead and other classic and recent writers whose works demonstrate the vital connection between individual personality and sociocultural context. The course will consist of lectures and discussion of readings, with grades based on short paper assignments. (4)

Instructor(s): D. Orlinsky     Terms Offered: Spring 2013
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 26101

CHDV 39301. Qualitative Research Methods. 100 Units.

The goal of this course is for students to learn a range of qualitative research methods, understand the uses and limitations of each of these methods, and gain hands-on experience designing, completing, and writing up a project using one or more of these methods. The first three weeks focus on developing a research plan: reviewing the literature, formulating a research question, and evaluating available methods to investigate that question. The remaining weeks will focus on research ethics, data collection, data analysis, and writeup. Throughout the course, we will be reading and discussing both texts that explicitly teach method and examples of different qualitative approaches, including ethnography, person-centered interviewing, Grounded Theory, narrative analysis, and cultural models. All students will complete a small-scale research project using one or more of the methods covered in this course. (M)

Instructor(s): E. Fein     Terms Offered: Winter 2013

CHDV 39900. Readings: Human Development. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring, Summer
Prerequisite(s): Instructor consent required.

CHDV 40000. HD Concepts. 100 Units.

Our assumptions about the processes underlying development shape how we read the literature, design studies, and interpret results.  The purpose of this course is two-fold in that, first, it makes explicit both our own assumptions as well as commonly held philosophical perspectives that impact the ways in which human development is understood. Second, the course provides an overview of theories and domain-specific perspectives related to individual development across the life-course.  The emphasis is on issues and questions that have dominated the field over time and, which continue to provide impetus for research, its interpretation, and the character of policy decisions and their implementation. Stated differently, theories have utility and are powerful tools. Accordingly, the course provides a broad basis for appreciating theoretical approaches to the study of development and for understanding the use of theory in the design of research and its application. Most significant, theories represent heuristic devices for “real time” interpretations of daily experiences and broad media disseminated messages.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHD Grad Students Only
Equivalent Course(s): PSYC 40900

CHDV 40207. Development in Adolescents. 100 Units.

Adolescence represents a period of unusually rapid growth and development. At the same time, under the best of social circumstances and contextual conditions, the teenage years represent a challenging period. The period also affords unparalleled opportunities with appropriate levels of support. Thus, the approach taken acknowledges the challenges and untoward outcomes, while also speculates about the predictors of resiliency and the sources of positive youth development. The perspective taken unpacks the developmental period's complexity as exacerbated by the many contextual and cultural forces which are often made worse by unacknowledged socially structured conditions, which interact with youths' unavoidable and unique meaning making processes. As a function of  some youths' privileging situations versus the low resource and chronic conditions of others, both coping processes and identity formation processes are emphasized as highly consequential. Thus, stage specific developmental processes are explored for understanding gap findings for a society's diverse youth. In sum, the course presents the experiences of diverse youth from a variety of theoretical perspectives. The strategy improves our understanding about the "what" of human development as well as the "how." Ultimately, the conceptual orientation described is critical for 1) designing better social policy, 2) improving  the training and support of socializing agents (e.g., teachers), and 3) enhancing human developmental outcomes (e.g., resilient patterns). (2)

Instructor(s): M. Spencer     Terms Offered: Winter

CHDV 40306. Academic and Behavior Gender Gaps Along the Pathway to Degree Attainment. 100 Units.

This course explores the complex intersection of race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status and gender in determining unequal outcomes in American education. We will examine the recent history of the reversal of the gender gap in academic achievement, the research evidence examining potential causes of this reversal, and policies aimed at improving male academic achievement. We will also examine whether issue of male underachievement only applies to subgroups of Americans as indexed by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status. Students will be introduced to several datasets that can be used to examine issues of how gender is associated with academic success along the pathway to degree attainment. Students are expected to complete a final empirical paper that includes the discussion of data, analyses, results, and policy implications. Students must have taken a graduate level statistics course as a prerequisite. (2)

Instructor(s): M. Keels     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Graduate level statistics course

CHDV 41050. Cultural Psychology. 100 Units.

There is a substantial portion of the psychological nature of human beings that is neither homogeneous nor fixed across time and space. At the heart of the discipline of cultural psychology is the tenet of psychological pluralism. Research findings in cultural psychology raise provocative questions about the integrity and value of alternative forms of subjectivity across cultural groups. This course analyzes the concept of "culture" and examines ethnic and cross-cultural variations in mental functioning, with special attention to the cultural psychology of emotions, self, moral judgment, categorization, and reasoning. (C)

Instructor(s): R. Shweder     Terms Offered: Autumn 2013
Prerequisite(s): Third- or fourth-year standing.
Equivalent Course(s): CHDV 21000,ANTH 21510,GNDR 21001,PSYC 23000

CHDV 41451. Evolutionary Psychology. 100 Units.

This course explores human social behavior from the perspective of a new discipline: evolutionary psychology. In this course we will read and discuss articles in which evolutionary theory has been applied to different aspects of human behavior and social life such as: developmental sex differences, cooperation and altruism, competition and aggression, physical attractiveness and mating strategies, incest avoidance and marriage, sexual coercion, parenting and child abuse, language and cognition, and psychological and personality disorders. (A, 1)

Instructor(s): D. Maestriperi, D. Gallo     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Undergraduates must have permission of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): PSYC 41450,CHDV 37801

CHDV 41920. The Evolution of Language. 100 Units.

How did language emerge in the phylogeny of mankind? Was its evolution saltatory or gradual? Did it start late or early and then proceed in a protracted way? Was the emergence monogenetic or polygenetic? What were the ecological prerequisites for the evolution, with the direct ecology situated in the hominine species itself, and when did the prerequisites obtain? Did there ever emerge a language organ or is this a post-facto construct that can be interpreted as a consequence of the emergence of language itself? What function did language evolve to serve, to enhance thought processes or to facilitate rich communication? Are there modern “fossils” in the animal kingdom that can inform our scholarship on the subject matter? What does paleontology suggest? We will review some of the recent and older literature on these questions and more.

Instructor(s): S. Mufwene     Terms Offered: Winter 2013
Equivalent Course(s): CHSS 41920,ANTH 47305,EVOL 41920,PSYC 41920,LING 21920,LING 41920

CHDV 42214. Ethnographic Writing. 100 Units.

This course is intended for qualitative, anthropologically oriented graduate students engaged in the act of ethnographic writing, be it a thesis, a prospectus or an article.  The course is organized around student presentations of work in progress and critical feedback from course participants.  It is hoped that each participant will emerge from the course with a polished piece of work. Only graduate students will be admitted and consent of the instructor is mandatory. (M)

Instructor(s): J. Cole     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor, graduate students only.

CHDV 42401. Trial Research in Human Development - I. 100 Units.

This course is taken in the Spring quarter of the first year, and again in the Autumn quarter of the second year.  The purpose of this seminar is to help students formulate and complete their trial research projects.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHD grad students only.
Note(s): Required

CHDV 42402. Trial Research in Human Development - II. 100 Units.

Second in required Trial Research Seminar sequence. The purpose of this seminar is to help students formulate and complete their trial research projects.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHDV 42401 Trial Research in Human Development - I
Note(s): CHD graduate students only. Required.

CHDV 43248. Research Methods in Behavior and Development. 100 Units.

In this graduate seminar we will discuss research design, experimental methods, statistical approaches and field techniques. Other topics will be covered depending on participant interests, such as acoustic analyses, ethogram development, event recorders, spectrophotometers, marking methods, spatial analyses and grant-writing strategies. The course is primarily designed for studies of non-human animals, although studies of human behavior, especially developmental studies, will be addressed. (M)

Instructor(s): J. Mateo     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.

CHDV 43302. Illness and Subjectivity. 100 Units.

While anthropology and other social sciences have long explored the social and cultural shaping of the self and personhood, many scholars have recently employed the rubric of “subjectivity” to articulate the links between collective phenomena and the subjective lives of individuals. This graduate seminar will examine “subjectivity”—and related concepts—focusing on topics where such ideas have been particularly fruitful: illness, pathology and suffering.  We will critically examine the terms “self,” “personhood” and “subjectivity”—and their relationship to one another. Additional literatures and topics covered may include: illness and narrative; healing and the self; personhood and new medical technologies. (3, 4*)

Instructor(s): E. Raikhel     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Graduate students only.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 51305

CHDV 43600. Processes of Judgement and Decision Making. 100 Units.

This course offers a survey of research on judgment and decision making, with emphasis placed on uncertainty and (intrapersonal) conflict. An historical approach is taken in which the roots of current research issues and practices are traced. Topics are drawn from the following areas: evaluation and choice when goals are in conflict and must be traded off, decision making when consequences of the decision are uncertain, predictive and evaluative judgments under conditions of uncertain, incomplete, conflicting, or otherwise fallible information.

Instructor(s): W. Goldstein     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): PSYC 43600

CHDV 44700. Seminar: Topics in Judgement and Decision Making. 100 Units.

This course offers a survey of research on judgment and decision making, with emphasis placed on uncertainty and (intrapersonal) conflict. An historical approach is taken in which the roots of current research issues and practices are traced. Topics are drawn from the following areas: evaluation and choice when goals are in conflict and must be traded off, decision making when consequences of the decision are uncertain, predictive and evaluative judgments under conditions of uncertain, incomplete, conflicting, or otherwise fallible information.

Instructor(s): W. Goldstein     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): PSYC 44700

CHDV 45501. Cognition and Education. 100 Units.

Cognition and Education will explore research bridging basic theroies of cognition with reigours studies of educational practice. This exciting pairing yields insights for both psychological theories of cognition and educational theories of practice. Complete psychological theories of cognition must be able to explain thinking and learning in dynamic, everyday contexts. At the same time, this work cannot impact pracitce without being well grounded in teachers and students' everyday activities. Course readings will include psychological studies of cognition and learning, developmental studies of children's thinking, and educational studies of teaching in STEM (Science, Technoglogy, engineering, and Mathematics) fields. (5*)

Instructor(s): L. Richland     Terms Offered: Spring

CHDV 45601. Moral Development & Comparative Ethics. 100 Units.

Three types of questions about morality can be distinguished: (1) philosophical, (2) psychological, and (3) epidemiological.  The philosophical question asks, whether and in what sense (if any) "goodness" or "rightness" are real or objective properties that particular actions possess in varying degrees.  The psychological question asks, what are the mental states and processes associated with the human classification of actions are moral or immoral, ethical or unethical.  The epidemiological question asks, what is the actual distribution of moral judgments across time (developmental time and historical time) and across space (for example, across cultures).  In this seminar we will read classic and contemporary philosophical, psychological and anthropological texts that address those questions. (B, C; 3)

Instructor(s): R. Shweder     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): PSYC 44000

CHDV 45700. Urban Field Research. 100 Units.

This course focuses on methods for collecting qualitative field data in urban settings from the ground up, so to speak, and to discuss some related methodological issues.  In addition to readings, there are field assignments and students discuss each other's notes. (M)

Instructor(s): R. Taub     Terms Offered: Spring 2013
Prerequisite(s): Graduate students in Social Sciences only.
Note(s): Offered every other year.
Equivalent Course(s): SOCI 50017

CHDV 47901-47902-47903. Beginning Modern Spoken Yucatec Maya I-II-III.

This course is a basic introduction to the modern Yucatec Maya language, an indigenous American language spoken by about 750,000 people in southeastern Mexico. Three consecutive quarters of instruction are intended for students aiming to achieve basic and intermediate proficiency. Students receiving FLAS support must take all three quarters. Others may elect to take only the first quarter or first two quarters. Students wishing to enter the course midyear (e.g., those with prior experience with the language) must obtain consent of instructor. Materials exist for a second year of the course; interested students should consult the instructor. Students wishing to continue their training with native speakers in Mexico may apply for FLAS funding in the summer.

CHDV 47901. Beginning Modern Spoken Yucatec Maya I. 100 Units.


Instructor(s): J. Lucy     Terms Offered: Not offered 2012-13; will be offered 2013-14
Equivalent Course(s): CHDV 27901,LACS 27901

CHDV 47902. Beginning Modern Spoken Yucatec Maya II. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): J. Lucy     Terms Offered: Not offered 2012-13; will be offered 2013-14
Equivalent Course(s): CHDV 27902,LACS 27902

CHDV 47903. Beginning Modern Spoken Yucatec Maya III. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): J. Lucy     Terms Offered: Not offered 2012-13; will be offered 2013-14
Equivalent Course(s): CHDV 27903,LACS 27903

CHDV 48415. Displaced nations and the politics of belonging. 100 Units.

While immigration has given rise to cultural hybridity and cosmopolitan forms of belonging, it has also produced diasporic nations and long-distance nationalisms that strive to maintain relationships with real or imagined homelands. This seminar examines what it means to belong to a nation that is not coterminous with a territorial state. It explores both the impact of diasporic nation-making on immigrant subjectivities and on the cultural politics of belonging in receiving states. How, for instance, does deterritorialized nation-making implicate immigrant bodies, histories, and subjectivities? How is the traditionally ethnos-based diasporic nation reconceptualised by considering intersecting queer solidarities or religious nationalisms? How does deterritorialized nation-making complicate ideologies of citizenship and belonging, and how do immigrant-receiving states manage these complications? To explore these issues, we will draw on ethnographic monographs and multidisciplinary theoretical perspectives that critically examine the concepts of the nation, nationalism, deterritorialized nationalism, and citizenship, as they implicate history and memory, the body, sexual and religious solidarities, and multiculturalism.  (3)

Instructor(s): G. Embuldeniya     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 45615

CHDV 49900. Research in Human Development. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring, Summer
Prerequisite(s): Instructor consent required.

CHDV 53350. Gesture, Sign, and Language. 100 Units.

The notion of gesture has been used in many ways and in a variety of disciplines. The study of sign languages has allowed us to raise a new series of questions about the role of gesture in language and communication. It is well established that gestures play an important role in spoken languages. What is the relationship between gestures used as an entire language (i.e., sign languages), and those used as a parallel part of a spoken language (i.e., the gestures of hearing people)? What cognitive mechanisms underlie the use of gesture in its various forms? How does the study of gesture shed light on the emergence of language? Scholars already working on gesture in the Humanities and Social Sciences Divisions may be invited to be guest lecturers in the course as time permits.

Instructor(s): D. Brentari, S. Goldin-Meadow     Terms Offered: Autumn 2012
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CDIN 53350,PSYC 43350,LING 53450