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Department of Classics

This is an archived copy of the 2012-13 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://catalogs.uchicago.edu.

Chair

  • Alain Bresson

Professors

  • Clifford Ando
  • Elizabeth Asmis
  • Shadi Bartsch-Zimmer
  • Alain Bresson
  • Christopher A. Faraone
  • Jonathan M. Hall
  • Michèle Lowrie
  • James M. Redfield
  • Peter White

Associate Professors

  • Michael I. Allen
  • Helma J. Dik
  • David G. Martinez
  • Mark Payne
  • David L. Wray

Assistant Professors

  • Emanuel Mayer
  • Sarah Nooter 

Emeritus Faculty

  • Walter R. Johnson
  • D. Nicholas Rudall

Affiliated Faculty

  • Agnes Callard, Philosophy
  • Tamara Chin, Comparative Literature
  • Michael Dietler, Anthropology
  • Jas’ Elsner, Art History
  • Elizabeth Gebhard, Director of Excavations, Isthmia
  • Cameron Hawkins, History
  • Janet Johnson, Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations
  • Walter Kaegi, History
  • Gabriel Richardson Lear, Philosophy
  • Bruce Lincoln, Divinity School
  • Boris Maslov, Comparative Literature
  • Glenn Most, Committee on Social Thought
  • Richard Neer, Art History
  • Martha Nussbaum, Philosophy and Law
  • Wendy Olmsted, Humanities
  • Dennis Pardee, Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations
  • James Redfield, Committee on Social Thought
  • Seth Richardson, Near Eastern Languages and Civilization
  • Kent Rigsby, Emeritus, Duke University
  • Robert Ritner, Near Eastern Languages and Civilization
  • Martha Roth, Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations
  • David Schloen, Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations
  • Andrea Seri, Near Eastern Languages and Civilization
  • Laura Slatkin, Committee on Social Thought
  • Jonathan Z. Smith, Humanities
  • Jeffrey Stackert, Divinity School
  • Matthew Stolper, Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations
  • Christopher Woods, Near Eastern Languages and Civilization
  • Theo van den Hout, Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations

The Department of Classics offers advanced study in the civilizations of the ancient Mediterranean, including literature and literary theory, history, philosophy, science, art, and archaeology. The programs of the department lead to the Ph.D. degree and seek to prepare students for careers in teaching and research. They allow students to explore areas with which they are unfamiliar, as well as to strengthen their knowledge in those in which they have already developed a special interest.

The classics faculty consists of active scholars, expert in one or more areas of classical studies. Apart from their influence through books and articles, the faculty has long been identified with the publication of Classical Philology, one of the leading journals devoted to classical antiquity. The diverse graduate students at the University include a number in programs outside the Department of Classics also engaged in the study of the ancient world. The Oriental Institute, the Divinity School, the Committee on Social Thought, and the Departments of History, Linguistics, & Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations all have programs that focus on different aspects of the classical period. Graduate student faculty workshops, where graduate students, faculty, and visiting scholars present work in progress, are a further means of scholarly collaboration and training. The department currently sponsors workshops entitled Ancient Societies, Rhetoric and Poetics, and Ancient Philosophy, which involve participants from other areas as well.

Research and Library Resources

The library system of the University contains over six million volumes. Classics has been one of the strongest parts of this collection since its first formation in 1891, when the University purchased the entire stock of an antiquarian bookstore in Berlin which specialized in classical philology, archaeology, and science. Apart from current monographs, the library receives more than seven hundred serials devoted to ancient Greece and Rome. Major editions of classical texts printed from the Renaissance through the eighteenth century are available in the Department of Special Collections, which also houses collections of Greek and Latin manuscripts and a large reference library devoted to paleography, manuscript catalogues, and facsimiles.

The database of the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae and the software needed to use it are accessible over the campus network; the Latin texts prepared by the Packard Humanities Institute, the CETE DOC database of ancient and medieval Christian Latin texts, and several other electronic databases useful to the study of the classics are mounted on workstations in the Regenstein Library; and additional computing resources are available in the departmental computer cluster in the Classics Building.

Fellowships

Students admitted to doctoral study are typically awarded a five-year fellowship package that includes full tuition, an annual living stipend, 2 summer stipends, and medical insurance. Teaching training is a vital part of the educational experience at the University, so all fellowships include a required teaching component.  Graduate students in classics may also apply for fellowships which aid students during the writing of Ph.D. dissertations and for travel fellowships that support visits to libraries, collections, and archaeological research sites in Europe and the Near East.

Teaching Opportunities

At the University of Chicago, graduate students have a variety of teaching opportunities including independently teaching.  The Center for Teaching and Learning conducts a series of workshops and forums designed  for graduate students to build skills in lecturing, leading discussions, and focusing writing assignments.The Little Red Schoolhouse, a nationally famous writing program, prepares graduate students to teach writing to undergraduate students.

Teaching opportunities lie in four areas. The first is in classics, where students who have completed the first two years of coursework may apply to serve as course assistants alongside regular faculty in the beginning Greek and Latin and ancient civilization sequences. Experienced course assistants may apply to teach independently in the first or second year language courses. Graduate students also have a broad role in the summer Greek and Latin Institute, and in the Graham School of General Studies, for which they are encouraged to offer courses of their own design (some recent courses have been devoted to the Iliad, the Odyssey, and the Aeneid).

The second area of teaching is through the Writing Program.  The  program offers three kinds of renewable teaching positions: Lectors in Academic and Professional Writing, Writing Interns in the Humanities Common Core, and Writing Tutors for the College Tutoring Program. All Writing Program instructors take a quarter-long course in the pedagogy of writing before they start teaching, and during their first quarter of teaching, they work closely with experienced writing program personnel as writing interns in the humanities and social sciences core courses of the College.

A third area of teaching is serving as the graduate assistant for the College’s ten-week Study Abroad program in Athens, which is regularly staffed by faculty from the Classics Department. The graduate assistant serves as both a course assistant and a resident assistant and as an instructor for a course entitled Readings in Attic Greek.

Finally, at the most advanced level, graduate students are eligible to teach sections of the humanities core sequence. All teaching is remunerated by a stipend proportional to the teaching responsibility and normally includes remission of tuition.

Programs of Study

The department offers Ph.D. degrees in Classical Languages and Literatures, the Ancient Mediterranean World, and Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy, as well as a joint Ph.D. in Social Thought and Classics.

Ph.D. Program in Classical Languages and Literatures

The curriculum in Classical Languages and Literatures emphasizes excellence in the Greek and Latin languages and training for scholarly investigation. Various kinds of courses are offered to meet the students’ needs and desires. Some are devoted to the reading of texts, with emphasis on the linguistic structure. Others stress literary, historical, or philosophical interpretation. Several seminars each year, which deal with Greek and Latin texts and are often related to current research interests of the faculty, invite students to think deeply about an aspect of antiquity and provide training in the writing of scholarly research papers. A synoptic view is furnished by a yearlong sequence devoted in alternate years to Greek and to Latin literature. These survey courses are designed to help the student acquire skill in the rapid reading of Greek and Latin. Students may also pursue individual interests by taking courses offered outside the department, and may, in special circumstances, arrange for independent study.

Applicants to the Program in Classical Languages & Literatures should have a strong background in Greek and Latin. Students with undergraduate degrees in other fields are encouraged to apply if their scholarly interests lie in classics and if they have begun intensive study to make up any deficiencies in Greek and Latin. All graduate students are expected to demonstrate proficiency in reading French and German, one language for the A.M. degree and the second for the Ph.D.; entering students should have begun this preparation if they are not already competent.

The Ph.D. Program in Classical Languages and Literatures is designed for six years, the first two being devoted to a full load of nine courses, the third and fourth to completing course work and examinations, and the final two to the dissertation.

In the first year of the Classical Languages and Literatures program, students regularly take one of the survey courses, a prose composition course, two seminars, at least two courses in the minor language, and other courses (often in other departments such as Art History, Linguistics, Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations, etc.) to meet special interests. Students are required to take the qualifying exam in the language of the survey sequence at the end of this year. This is also the year to pass the first modern language exam in French or German. Students who complete their coursework and pass the French or German exam are awarded the A.M. in Classical Languages and Literatures.

The second year is similar, usually with a major focus on the second survey course and such courses as may allow students to explore new areas; in the spring, students are required to pass the second language qualifying examination. In the third year, students are expected to pass two two-hour oral comprehensive examinations in the history, literature, and culture of Greco-Roman antiquity.  In the fourth year and fifth year students should expect to develop a topic for the dissertation, and to write the dissertation.

Ph.D. Program in the Ancient Mediterranean World

The Program in the Ancient Mediterranean World (formerly the Committee on the Ancient Mediterranean World) was founded in 1975 with the intention of bringing together faculty whose fields of study, ranging from the ancient Near East and the ancient Greek world to late antiquity, adjoin and overlap chronologically and geographically. While these fields require mastery of relevant languages, the Program in the Ancient Mediterranean World is focused less on texts than on contexts; it offers students an opportunity to use philological skills in historical and cultural explorations. Most students in this program are in the areas of ancient history, history of ancient religions, Greek and Near Eastern studies, or late antiquity.

Although not primarily a language program, students in the Program in the Ancient Mediterranean World are required to take competency examinations in two ancient languages and should therefore have a strong background in at least one. All graduate students are expected to demonstrate proficiency in reading French and German, one language for the A.M. degree and the second for the Ph.D.; entering students should have begun this preparation if they are not already competent.

The Ph.D. Program in the Ancient Mediterranean World is designed for six years, the first two being devoted to a full load of nine courses, the third and fourth to completing course work and examinations, and the final two to the dissertation. In the first year of the Ancient Mediterranean World program, students regularly take the two-quarter research seminar and a range of courses, at least two of which must be distributed across two of the following disciplinary fields: literature; philosophy/religion; art/archaeology; and social sciences (e.g. anthropology, sociology, political science). This is also the year to pass the first modern language exam in French or German. Students who complete their coursework and pass the French or German exam are awarded the A.M. in the Ancient Mediterranean World. In the second year, students are required to take a further nine courses, at least two of which must be distributed across a different pair of the disciplinary fields specified above and to pass the first ancient language qualifying examination. Before the end of the third year, students are required to pass written and oral examinations in one major and two minor historical fields and, before the end of the fourth year, the second ancient language qualifying examination. Students should also, in the course of their fourth year, expect to develop a topic for the dissertation, which is written in the fifth and sixth years.

Ph.D. Program in Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy

The study of ancient Greek and Roman philosophy is inherently interdisciplinary. Scholars must be able to situate philosophical texts in their broader cultural context. They must also be alive to the way a given text engages with and contributes to its philosophical tradition. Finally, they must be able to communicate effectively with scholars trained in either Classics or Philosophy. Thus, a student who plans to specialize in ancient philosophy ought to receive an interdisciplinary training. The Program in Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy allows students to enroll either in the PhD program in Classics or in the PhD program in Philosophy but with the requirement that they will take certain courses in the department in which they are not enrolled. The program is a joint program in the sense that the faculty of both departments are committed to training students in the other department and in the sense that the students will develop a working relationship with each other, both through participation in seminars and in the Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy workshop.

The Ph.D. Program in Classical Languages and Literatures is designed for six years, the first two being devoted to a full load of nine courses, the third and fourth to completing course work and examinations, and the final two to the dissertation. In the first year, students regularly take one of the survey courses, a prose composition course, two quarters of seminar work, at least one of which must be in ancient philosophy, one course in the Philosophy department that deals with a topic other than Greek or Roman Philosophy, and one course in the minor language. Students are required to take the qualifying exam in the language of the survey sequence at the end of this year and also the first modern language exam in French or German. Students who complete their coursework and pass the French or German exam are awarded the A.M. in Classical Languages and Literatures. The second year is similar; in the spring, students are required to pass the second language qualifying examination. In the third year, students are required to take two additional graduate courses on a philosophical topic and the special field exam, which is a written examination on a Greek or Latin philosophical text (complete or an excerpt) of the candidate's own choosing. In the fourth year and fifth year students should expect to develop a topic for the dissertation, and to write the dissertation.

The Joint Ph.D. Program in Social Thought and Classics

The Joint Ph.D. Program in Social Thought and Classics is intended for students whose study of a particular issue or text from the ancient Greek and Roman world requires a broadly interdisciplinary approach alongside a professional mastery of philological skills. Those interested in pursuing this joint degree program must first be admitted in EITHER the Committee on Social Thought OR the Department of Classics and must complete at minimum the three quarter language survey (Greek or Latin) offered by the Department of Classics, with an average grade of B or higher. Application shall then be made to the second department and, provided that the standards of admission to that department are met, students will be admitted to joint degree status. Their original department, however, will remain their sole department for purposes of registration and financial aid (including dissertation fellowships).

Students admitted to the joint degree program must satisfy both all the normal requirements for the A.M. and Ph.D. in Classical Languages and Literatures and all the normal requirements for the A.M. and Ph.D. in Social Thought. However, the Social Thought language requirement of a high level pass in a foreign language exam will be automatically met by the requirements of the Classics program. Students with joint degree status will be required to offer at least a majority of non Classical texts on the Social Thought Fundamentals Examination. The dissertation proposal will have to be approved by both departments and the dissertation committee will normally include three faculty, at least one of whom will come from each department.

Application

The application process for admission and financial aid for all graduate programs in the Division of the Humanities is administered through the divisional Office of the Dean of Students. The Application for Admission and Financial Aid, with instructions, deadlines and department specific information is available online at: http://humanities.uchicago.edu/prospective/admissions.html .

Questions about admissions and aid should be directed to humanitiesadmissions@uchicago.edu or (773) 702-1552.

Courses

The courses listed below are offered regularly, normally on a three-year rotating basis. In addition, new courses are frequently introduced, especially seminars and classics courses, and these cannot be predicted very far in advance. In recent years, courses included seminars on Early Rome, Tragedy and the Tragic, A History of Rhetoric, Greek Tragedy in Africa, Juvenal, The Ancient Economy, Oral Poetries, The Poetry of Death, Security in Latin Literature, and Stoics and Epicureans.

Greek

Homer
Hesiod
Greek Hymns
Greek Lyric Poetry
Greek Elegy
Plato
Aeschylus
Aristophanes
Menander
Herodotus
Sophocles
Euripides
Survey of Greek Literature I
Survey of Greek Literature II
Survey of Greek Literature III
Lyric and Epinician Poetry
Aristotle
Thucydides
Greek Prose Composition
Theocritus
Hellenistic Poetry
Greek Linguistics

Latin

Livy
Roman Elegy
Roman Novel
Vergil
Augustine
Lucretius
Roman Satire
Roman Oratory
Survey of Latin Literature I
Survey of Latin Literature II
Survey of Latin Literature III
Ovid
Sallust and Tacitus
Horace
Roman Comedy
Silver Latin Epic
Latin Prose Composition
Political Philosophy
Latin Paleography
Medieval Literature
Letters: Cicero and Sen

Classics - Classics Courses

CLAS 30200. North Africa, Late Antiquity-Islam. 100 Units.

Examination of topics in continuity and change from the third through ninth centuries CE, including changes in Roman, Vandalic, Byzantine, and early Islamic Africa. Topics include the waning of paganism and the respective spread and waning of Christianity, the dynamics of the seventh-century Muslim conquest and Byzantine collapse. Transformation of late antique North Africa into a component of Islamic civilization. Topography and issues of the autochthonous populations will receive some analysis. Most of the required reading will be on reserve, for there is no standard textbook. Readings in translated primary sources as well as the latest modern scholarship. Final examination and 10 page course paper.

Instructor(s): W. Kaegi     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 25701,CLCV 20200,CRES 25701,HIST 35701,NEHC 20634,NEHC 30634

CLAS 31200. History and Theory of Drama I. 100 Units.

The course is a survey of major trends and theatrical accomplishments in drama from the ancient Greeks through the Renaissance: Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, classical Sanskrit theater, medieval religious drama, Japanese Noh drama, Kyd, Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Molière, along with some consideration of dramatic theory by Aristotle, Sir Philip Sidney, Corneille, and others. Students have the option of writing essays or putting on short scenes in cooperation with other members of the course. The goal of these scenes is not to develop acting skill but, rather, to discover what is at work in the scene and to write up that process in a somewhat informal report. End-of-week workshops, in which individual scenes are read aloud dramatically and discussed, are optional but highly recommended.

Instructor(s): D. Bevington, J. Muse     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Preference given to students with third- or fourth-year standing.
Note(s): May be taken in sequence with ENGL 13900/31100 or individually. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.
Equivalent Course(s): ENGL 13800,CLCV 21200,CMLT 20500,CMLT 30500,ENGL 31000,TAPS 28400

CLAS 32812. Reconsidering Rostovtzeff: Long Distant Trade and Cultural Exchange between the Mediterranean, Central Asia, Arabia and India 3000 BCE- 300 CE. 100 Units.

In the first half of the twentieth century, Mikhail Rostovtzeff dominated the field of Hellenistic and Roman social and economic history. Despite his unparalleled mastery of the evidence – which included archaeological material – his presentist analysis of the ancient world and his general lack of methodological sophistication have made his work a favorite target of criticism. Still, many of Rostovtzeff’s impressionistic and intuitive conclusions seem to hold water in the light of recent archaeological work. This applies in particular to his ideas about “Caravan Cities” and long-distance trade. In this course we will read through portions of Rostovtzeff’s extensive work, compare it with recently uncovered archaeological evidence, and discuss whether his conclusions could be salvaged by putting them into a more rigorous theoretical framework.

Instructor(s): E. Mayer

CLAS 33400. Boethius: Consolation of Philosophy. 100 Units.

The Consolation of Philosophy, which Boethius wrote in prison after a life of study and public service, offers a view on Roman politics and culture after Rome ceased to be an imperial capital. The Consolation is also a poignant testament from a man divided between Christianity and philosophy. About 70 pages of the text are read in Latin, and all of it in English. Secondary readings provide historical and religious context for the early sixth century AD. 

Instructor(s): Peter White     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Latin 20300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): LATN 23400

CLAS 34506. Alexander the Great. 100 Units.

The exploits of Alexander the Great have fascinated historians since the end of the third century B.C. This course will provide an introduction not only to the history of Alexander’s reign, but also to the main historiographical traditions (both ancient and modern) that shape our view of his legacy. All sources will be read in translation.

Instructor(s): C. Hawkins
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 20802,CLCV 24506,HIST 30802

CLAS 34812. The Historical Context of the Platonic Dialogue. 100 Units.

Plato’s historical fictions, like most such work, use the past as a way of confronting with current issues. This course will place them in the context of the history of philosophy and the development of prose literature, at a time when colloquial prose was new and philosophy was a highly contested term, overlapping with religion. Final paper.

Instructor(s): James Redfield     Terms Offered: Winter 2013
Note(s): 0pen to undergrads with consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 24812,SCTH 31920

CLAS 35107. Empire and Enlightenment. 100 Units.

The European Enlightenment was a formative period in the development of modern historiography. It was also an age in which the expansionist impulse of European monarchies came under intense philosophical scrutiny on moral, religious, cultural, and economic grounds. We chart a course through these debates by focusing in the first instance on histories of Rome by William Robertson and Edward Gibbon, as well as writing on law and historical method by Giambattista Vico.

Instructor(s): C. Ando and R. Lerner     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 25107,HIST 20502,HIST 30502

CLAS 36508. Economy and Society in Ancient Greece and Rome. 100 Units.

In this course we will explore not only the nature of ancient Greek and Roman economies, but also the way in which social and political structures constrained or facilitated the efforts of individuals to devise successful strategies within those economies.  We will consider trade, manufacture, and agriculture, and we will devote considerable attention to issues of methodology: what questions should we ask about ancient economic life, and with what evidence can we answer them?

Instructor(s): C. Hawkins     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 21005,CLCV 26508,HIST 31005

CLAS 37112. Ancient Metaphysics. 100 Units.

 In this course we shall study some of the very different accounts of the world developed by the ancient Greek philosophers. In particular we shall consider the following: Aristotle’s ontology of form and matter, actuality and potentiality; Epicurean atomism; the Stoic strange combination of rationalism and thoroughgoing physicalism of all-pervading pneuma; Platonic theories of a transcendent realm.    

Instructor(s): E. Emilsson
Equivalent Course(s): PHIL 21503,CLCV 27112,PHIL 31503

CLAS 37909. Visual Culture of Rome and Its Empire. 100 Units.

This general survey of Roman material culture will use the archaeological evidence complementary to literary sources in order to delineate the development of Roman society from the Early Republic down to the first sacking of Rome in 410 CE. Urban planning, public monuments, political imagery, and the visual world of Roman cities, houses, and tombs will be discussed in relationship to the political and social processes that shaped their formal development.

Instructor(s): E. Mayer     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 27909,ARTH 26910,ARTH 36910

CLAS 38609. Greek and Roman Historiography. 100 Units.

This course will provide a survey of the most important historical writers of the Greek and Roman world.  We will read extensive selections from their work in translation, and discuss both the development of historiography as a literary genre and the development of history as a discipline in the ancient world.  Finally, we will consider the implications these findings hold for our ability to use the works of Greek and Roman historical writers in our own efforts to construct narratives of the past.

Instructor(s): C. Hawkins     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 20503,ANCM 38609,CLCV 28609,HIST 30503

CLAS 39200. Mimesis. 100 Units.

This course will examine one of the central concepts of comparative literature: mimesis (imitation). We will investigate traditional theoretical and historical debates concerning literary and visual mimesis as well as more recent discussions of its relation to non-western and colonial contexts. Readings will include Aristotle, Auerbach, Butler, Spivak, and Taussig. Students are encouraged to write final papers on their own research topics while engaging with issues discussed through the course.

Instructor(s): Tamara Chin     Terms Offered: Winter 2013
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 30100,CMLT 30202

CLAS 40609. Democratic Athens. 100 Units.

For course description contact Art History.

Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 40610,ANCM 40609

CLAS 44512. Virgil, The Aeneid. 100 Units.

A close literary analysis of one of the most celebrated works of European literature. While the text, in its many dimensions, will offer more than adequate material for classroom analysis and discussion, attention will also be directed to the extraordinary reception of this epic, from Virgil's times to ours.

Instructor(s): Glenn Most     Terms Offered: Winter 2013
Prerequisite(s): Latin helpful
Equivalent Course(s): ENGL 35902,CMLT 35902,SCTH 35902

Classics - Greek Courses

GREK 31100. Elegiac Poetry. 100 Units.

This course is a study of poems composed over a number of centuries in the elegiac meter. Beginning with some of the works of Archilochus and Callinus, we continue through Solon and Simonides to Callimachus and other Hellenistic poets.

Terms Offered: Will be offered 2013-14.
Prerequisite(s): GREK 20300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 21100

GREK 31200. Plato. 100 Units.

Plato's styles range from conversational to lyrical to rhetorical, and so on. A master of characterization and parody, he brings a deep appreciation of poetry to his prose. Or so we think. How can we actually identify Plato's "style" or "styles?" This question has been much debated and, between purple passages, we consider the literature of style and authenticity in the Platonic corpus.

Terms Offered: Not offered 2012-13; will be offered 2013-14.
Prerequisite(s): GREK 20300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 21200

GREK 31300. Tragedy. 100 Units.

This course is an introduction to Aeschylean drama in general, seen through the special problems posed by one play. Lectures and discussions are concerned with the play, the development and early form of Attic drama, and philosophical material. Modern Aeschylean scholars are also read and discussed.

Terms Offered: Will be offered 2013-14.
Prerequisite(s): GREK 20300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 21300

GREK 31700. Lyric and Epinician Poetry. 100 Units.

This course will examine the lyric and epinician genres of archaic and classical Greece, focusing on song performed both by choruses and by individuals, and on themes ranging from mortality to joy, morality to sex, and politics to drinking. The imagery and performance of these poems will be explored, as well as the mechanics of meter, structure, and dialect. Readings will include Alcman, Sappho, Anacreon, Alcaeus, Simonides, Bacchylides, Pindar, and Timotheus.

Instructor(s): S. Nooter     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): GREK 20300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 21700

GREK 31712. Hymns: Homeric and Hellenistic. 100 Units.

In this course we will read some of the greatest hits of Greek literary hymns. We will explore the Iliadic undertones of the Homeric Hymn to Demeter, erotic power plays in the Homeric Hymn to Antigone, and the comedic buoyancy of the Homeric Hymn to Hermes. We will then look at Callimachus’ take on hymns, and will inquire into the tensions of genre-bending and replication as he turns the Homeric into the Hellenistic. Through it all, we will seek to find the meaning and  raison d’être of these hymns whose contexts elude us: are they sacred offerings to the gods or playful poetical events?

Instructor(s): S. Nooter     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): PQ: GREK 20300 or equivalent.
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 21712

GREK 31800. Greek Epic. 100 Units.

This course is a reading of Book 3 of the Argonautica of Apollonius of Rhodes. We consider character, story world, and the presence of the poet as we endeavor to understand what has become of epic poetry in the hands of its Hellenistic inheritors.

Instructor(s): M. Lowrie     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Two years or more of Greek.
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 21800

GREK 31900. Greek Oratory. 100 Units.

"With Isocrates, Greek artistic prose reached its technical perfection," says L. R. Palmer in The Greek Language.  Yet Isocrates has not found nearly so prominent a place in the university curriculum as have Demosthenes and Lysias. This course will attempt to give the great orator his due. We will start with his speech on Helen, comparing it with Gorgias' famous Encomium. We will also read the ad Demonicum, which became something of a handbook in later Hellenistic and Roman-period schools, and the Panygyricus. We will consider carefully Isocratean language and diction, and why it has merited such sustained praise among connoisseurs of Greek prose style, ancient and modern. We will also emphasize the centrality of Isocrates' contribution to Greek paideia.

Instructor(s): D. Martinez     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Two years or more of Greek.
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 21900

GREK 32300. Greek Tragedy I: Euripides. 100 Units.

We will try to read all of Euripides’ Hippolytus in Greek. Students will be expected to prepare translations for class as well as read secondary material in English. Discussions will focus on the representation of shame aidos and desire, transgression and punishment, and speech and silence in the play.

Terms Offered: Will not be offered 2012-2013; will be offered to 2014-15.
Prerequisite(s): GREK 20600 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 22300

GREK 32400. Greek Comedy: Aristophanes. 100 Units.

We will read in Greek Aristophanes' Lysistrata, a play whose timeless popularity often overshadows the fact that it was produced during a particularly menacing period of Athens’ history. Students will prepare translations for class on Mondays and Wednesdays while Fridays will be devoted to discussions, based on secondary readings, that will include staging issues, the function of political comedy, and the potential uses of Aristophanes’ plays as historical evidence.

Terms Offered: Will not be offered 2012-2013; will be offered to 2014-15.
Prerequisite(s): GREK 20600 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 22400

GREK 32500. Greek Historians: Herodotus. 100 Units.

Book I is read in Greek; the rest of the Histories are read in translation. With readings from secondary literature, historical and literary approaches to the Histories are discussed, and the status of the Histories as a historical and literary text.

Instructor(s): C. Faraone     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): GREK 20600 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 22500

GREK 40112. Sohocles, Oedipus at Colonus. 100 Units.

A close literary and philological analysis of one of the most extraordinary of all Greek tragedies. While this play, in its many dimensions, will offer more than adequate material for classroom analysis and discussion, some attention will also be directed to its reception.

Instructor(s): Glenn Most     Terms Offered: Winter 2013
Prerequisite(s): Greek or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 35903,SCTH 35901

GREK 41612. Seminar. Constructing Oedipus: Performance and Adaptation. 100 Units.

This course will start with a close reading of Sophocles’ play and relevant literary criticism. We will then survey the reception of Oedipus Tyrannus through the centuries, reading from different texts and adaptations, and touching along the way on issues of reception theory itself. The course will coincide with an on-campus performance of a version of Oedipus, and students will be invited to contribute to this production or, at least, attend to the process. Experience of the practice of theater and staging will supplement our readings, which will range from Aristotle, Freud, and Lévi-Strauss to Stravinsky, Dove, and Rotimi.

Instructor(s): S. Nooter, D. Wray     Terms Offered: Spring

Classics - Latin Courses

LATN 31100. Roman Elegy. 100 Units.

This course examines the development of the Latin elegy from Catullus to Ovid. Our major themes are the use of motifs and topics and their relationship to the problem of poetic persona.

Terms Offered: Not offered 2012-13; will be offered 2013-14.
Equivalent Course(s): LATN 21100,CMLT 21101,CMLT 31101

LATN 31200. Roman Novel. 100 Units.

This course is a reading of selected sections of Apuleius's novel, including the story of Cupid and Psyche and the initiation into the cult of Isis. We study the novel in the context of the history of the ancient novel. Special attention is given to Apuleius's own contribution as a magician and philosopher.

Terms Offered: Not offered 2012-13; will be offered 2013-14.
Equivalent Course(s): LATN 21200

LATN 31300. Vergil. 100 Units.

Extensive readings in the Aeneid are integrated with extensive selections from the newer secondary literature to provide a thorough survey of recent trends in Vergilian criticism and of Latin poetry more generally.

Terms Offered: Will be offered 2013-14.
Equivalent Course(s): LATN 21300,FNDL 25201

LATN 31700. Epic. 100 Units.

We will read two books of Ovid's Metamorphoses in Latin and the entire poem in translation. Discussion topics will include prosody, diction, narrative technique, epic tradition, and comparative mythology.

Instructor(s): S. Bartsch     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Latin 203 or quivalent
Equivalent Course(s): LATN 21700

LATN 31800. Roman Historian. 100 Units.

Primary readings are drawn from books 1 and 2 of the Histories, in which Tacitus describes a series of coups and revolts that made 69 AD the “Year of the Four Emperors.” Parallel accounts and secondary readings are used to help bring out the methods of selecting and ordering data and the stylistic effects that typify a Tacitean narrative. 

Instructor(s): P. White     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Latin 20300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): LATN 21800

LATN 31900. Roman Comedy. 100 Units.

This course is a reading of a comic play by Plautus or Terence with discussion of original performance context and issues of genre, Roman comedy's relation to Hellenistic New Comedy, and related questions.

Instructor(s): D. Wray     Terms Offered: Spring.
Prerequisite(s): Latin 20300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): LATN 21900

LATN 32100. Lucretius. 100 Units.

We will read selections of Lucretius' magisterial account of a universe composed of atoms. The focus of our inquiry will be: how did Lucretius convert a seemingly dry philosophical doctrine about the physical composition of the universe into a gripping message of personal salvation? The selections will include Lucretius' vision of an infinite universe, of heaven, and of the hell that humans have created for themselves on earth.

Terms Offered: Not offered 2012-13; will be offered 2014-15
Equivalent Course(s): LATN 22100

LATN 32200. Roman Satire. 100 Units.

The course will focus on Juvenal, and also consider the commentary tradition.

Terms Offered: Not offered 2012-13; will be offered 2014-15
Equivalent Course(s): LATN 22200

LATN 32300. Roman Oratory. 100 Units.

Two of Cicero's speeches for the defense in the criminal courts of Rome receive a close reading in Latin and in English. The speeches are in turn considered in relation to Cicero's rhetorical theory as set out in the De Oratore and in relation to the role of the criminal courts in Late Republican Rome.

Terms Offered: Not offered 2012-13; will be offered 2014-15
Equivalent Course(s): LATN 22300

LATN 32400. Post-Vergilian Epic. 100 Units.

Lucan. The goal of this course is threefold: 1. To read through some 2,000 lines of the Bellum Civile in Latin; 2. To read all of the epic in English; 3. To explore the critical responses to this play in the 20th century.

Instructor(s): S. Bartsch     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): LATN 20300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): LATN 22400

LATN 32700. Survey of Latin Literature I: 100 Units.

We shall read extended selections from prose writers of recognized importance to the Latin tradition. Our sampling of texts will emphasize writers of the Late Republic and Early Principate.

Instructor(s): E. Asmis     Terms Offered: Winter

LATN 32800. Survey of Latin Literature II. Units.

With emphasis on major trends in modern critical interpretations of the major figures.

Instructor(s): M. Lowrie     Terms Offered: Spring

LATN 33400. Boethius: Consolation of Philosophy. 100 Units.

The Consolation of Philosophy, which Boethius wrote in prison after a life of study and public service, offers a view on Roman politics and culture after Rome ceased to be an imperial capital. The Consolation is also a poignant testament from a man divided between Christianity and philosophy. About 70 pages of the text are read in Latin, and all of it in English. Secondary readings provide historical and religious context for the early sixth century AD. 

Instructor(s): Peter White     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Latin 20300 or equivalent

LATN 35200. Medieval Latin. 100 Units.

The course traces developments and continuities in Latin literature from the late-fourth century to the tenth. We examine new Christian literary idioms, such as hymnody, hagiography, and the theological essay, as well as reinterpretations of classical forms of poetry, epistle, biography, and historical writing. We consider the peculiarities of medieval Latin. Attention will be paid to how and where literature was cultivated.

Instructor(s): M. Allen     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): LATN 25200

LATN 36000. Latin Paleography (At Newberry Library) 100 Units.

The course will emphasize the development of Latin handwriting, primarily as book scripts, from its origins to the waning of the Carolingian minuscule, ca. A.D. 1100. By mastering the foundational types of writing, the students will develop skills for reading all Latin-based scripts, including those used for vernacular languages and the subsequent Gothics and their derivatives down to the sixteenth century.

Instructor(s): M. Allen     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): LATN 26000

Classics - Modern Greek Courses

MOGK 30100-30200. Accelerated Elementary Modern Greek I-II.

This course is designed to help students acquire communicative competence in Modern Greek and a basic understanding of its structures. Through a variety of exercises, students develop all skill sets.

MOGK 30100. Accelerated Elementary Modern Greek I. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): MOGK 11100,LGLN 11100

MOGK 30200. Accelerated Elementary Modern Greek II. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Not offered in 2012-13
Equivalent Course(s): MOGK 11200,LGLN 11200